Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
JSngry

The Story Behind John Cage’s 4’33”

14 posts in this topic

By 1949, a cultural plague was being piped into offices, train stations, and bus terminals: canned, generic background music. The brainchild of an Army general, the idea was pure packaged capitalism. The Muzak Corporation sold hundreds of businesses and cities on the promise that a wash of faint background music would increase productivity, quell boredom, and prevent people from skipping work.

Cage hated it. It was just more proof that silence was going extinct...

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-story-behind-john-cage-s-4-33?utm_source=pocket-newtab

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the jazz version.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

0'00''?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to read No Such Thing as Silence*....planning on doing something about it.

 

 



* Kyle Gann book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is that a worthy read?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, JSngry said:

Is that a worthy read?

Haven't read it, but I expect so. When Gann was still active on the internet (used to blog, and his website when active was a big resource), I read several excerpts/drafts from the book in process, which he posted as written. I think Gann's one of the best commentators on contemporary music, though some might not agree with his advocacy of "totalism".

Edited by T.D.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, T.D. said:

... though some might not agree with his advocacy of "totalism".

https://www.kylegann.com/postminimalism.html

Not sure about that, I don't know enough to have an informed opinion. But the principle behind this thought strikes me as a cogent one, dealing as it does with music as evolution rather than photography:

 One could imagine that some future history of music will describe the period starting in the late 20th century as follows: "Our current musical language arose in the 1960s and '70s. In its nascent, simplistic state, it was at first mistaken for a full-blown style in itself, and was termed 'Minimalism'...."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few weeks ago, I saw in a Woodstock art gallery a copy of the original concert program:

433-program.jpg

Note that (as pointed out by Kyle Gann in link below) they botched 4'33" in the program!

Interesting transcript of a talk by Gann on 4'33" here. The link at the top of this thread cites Gann.

Edited by T.D.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Online event!

https://www.woodstockart.org/events/johncage-433-magnusson-benevento-larson/

Marco Benevento, Kay Larson, and Norm Magnusson
John Cage’s 4’33”
Virtual event
Sat. August 29, time TBA | FREE

Announcing the WAAM 10th Annual anniversary performance of John Cage’s 4’33”
When: Saturday, August 29, 2020, 6:00pm
Where: Streaming live from the Towbin Wing Gallery of the Woodstock Artists Association,
viewable online through zoom link

Featuring: the musical talents of Marco Benevento and the insights of Cage biographer Kay Larson.
Produced by: Norm Magnussen

The event will include a performance of 4’33, followed by a talk by Kay Larson. Marco Benevento will then pay [sic] some pieces of his own choosing.

Cage’s piece had its world debut on August 29, 1952, in Woodstock, during a concert program produced by The Woodstock Artists Association.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was written in Bb, but Miles played it in F.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/19/2019 at 3:02 PM, Rooster_Ties said:

.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And Miles substituted his own, simpler bridge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/15/2019 at 5:10 PM, JSngry said:

By 1949, a cultural plague was being piped into offices, train stations, and bus terminals: canned, generic background music. The brainchild of an Army general, the idea was pure packaged capitalism. The Muzak Corporation sold hundreds of businesses and cities on the promise that a wash of faint background music would increase productivity, quell boredom, and prevent people from skipping work.

Cage hated it. It was just more proof that silence was going extinct...

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-story-behind-john-cage-s-4-33?utm_source=pocket-newtab

I LOVE the Muzak corporation, and I LOVE their stimulus progression theory.  It is very David Cronenberg.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.