Dave James

Woodstock - How Much Were They Paid?

48 posts in this topic

I succumbed to peer pressure and went to a Chicago concert somewhere during my high school years and Madura opened (I think they were managed by the same guy, that Guercio dude). I was really NOT liking Chicago by then, but was pleasantly surprised with Madura. Never bought any records or anything, but the name stuck, and in the 45 or so years since, I've met, like, at most 3 people who have heard of them.

I mean, today, bfd, right? But compared to Quill??????

 

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For those unfamiliar with the Keef Hartley band, here's one of my favorites from their album, "Halfbreed."

'.

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7 hours ago, Dave James said:

For those unfamiliar with the Keef Hartley band, here's one of my favorites from their album, "Halfbreed."

'.

Also a favorite of mine.  Miller Anderson ruled!

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13 hours ago, JSngry said:

I succumbed to peer pressure and went to a Chicago concert somewhere during my high school years and Madura opened (I think they were managed by the same guy, that Guercio dude). I was really NOT liking Chicago by then, but was pleasantly surprised with Madura. Never bought any records or anything, but the name stuck, and in the 45 or so years since, I've met, like, at most 3 people who have heard of them.

I mean, today, bfd, right? But compared to Quill??????

 

Very mixed bag there.  I like the second cut quite a bit, and find the MFT portion of the first cut very nice, but the "Funky Broadway" chick shtick is really hard to take in 2019 (and I bet it also was in 1973).  Must have seemed like a good idea to somebody.  I actually love the first two Chicago double albums, and like III/IV/V quite a bit.  Goes downhill from there, and useless by VIII.   Really really liked Guercio's earlier work with the Buckinghams.

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Yeah, I mean, all this stuff is pretty much irrelevant now, for me anyway. OOOOH, a "rock" band that has competent players that can jam and "get it on"...when I had a low ceiling of impressibility, that mattered a fair bit. Nowadays...who cares? About rock and/or jamming and or "getting it on"? I keep it in the memory bank because its there, and probably can't be removed without brain surgery and/or trauma, and who wants that?, but otherwise...

Still, Quill? Really? Talk about "white privilege"...in an event essentially predicated on that dynamic, there's Exhibit A! :g :g :g

If we want to reminisce about "jazz rock" bands that people on the finger of one hand have heard of, I'll open the bidding with Archie Whitewater. But remember, all sales final, no refunds!

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Posted (edited)

4 hours ago, JSngry said:

If we want to reminisce about "jazz rock" bands that people on the finger of one hand have heard of, I'll open the bidding with Archie Whitewater. But remember, all sales final, no refunds!

I'll see your Archie Whitewater (which I am quite enjoying, thanks!) and raise you a Good God - excellent covers of John McLaughlin's "Dragon Song" and Zappa's "King Kong".  

Image result for good god king kong

Edited by felser

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Here are a few other lesser known 60's bands and artists worthy of a second look:

Camel

Rare Bird

Upp

Three Man Army

Pink Fairies

Blodwyn Pig

Bebop Deluxe

Cold Blood

Sons of Champlin

Dan Hicks & His Hot Licks

Moby Grape

Batdorf & Rodney (the latter was the son of Red Rodney)

Shawn Phillips

ian Matthews (w/ and w/o Southern Comfort)

Pacific Gas & Electric

Kalapana

The Blues Project

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Dave James said:

Here are a few other lesser known 60's bands and artists worthy of a second look:

Camel

Rare Bird

Upp

Three Man Army

Pink Fairies

Blodwyn Pig

Bebop Deluxe

Cold Blood

Sons of Champlin

Dan Hicks & His Hot Licks

Moby Grape

Batdorf & Rodney (the latter was the son of Red Rodney)

Shawn Phillips

ian Matthews (w/ and w/o Southern Comfort)

Pacific Gas & Electric

Kalapana

The Blues Project

 

 

 

Good music.  Agree most are lesser-known, though few are obscure.  I have dozens of CD's combined by these groups.  Kalapana and Upp are new to me, but they appear to be mid - 70's groups.  Love the early Rare Bird albums and the first few Shawn Phillips A&M albums and the original two Blodwyn Pig albums.  Blues Project with Al Kooper are pretty legendary and very good.  Have never heard the Three Man Army albums, ca early 70's.  Camel were a very accomplished 70's Canterbury prog group.  Moby Grape were notorious for Columbia's over-promotion of their debut album.  Ian Matthews was originally the "other" singer in Fairport Convention.  PG&E had a great 1971 single - "Are You Ready".

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17 hours ago, felser said:

I'll see your Archie Whitewater (which I am quite enjoying, thanks!) and raise you a Good God - excellent covers of John McLaughlin's "Dragon Song" and Zappa's "King Kong".  

Image result for good god king kong

I'll call you (in Canadian dollars) with Lighthouse, even though they had a 45 hit. They were on some really weirdass unlikely label and did more than one album. But geez, who will buy, as that song said.

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55 minutes ago, JSngry said:

I'll call you (in Canadian dollars) with Lighthouse, even though they had a 45 hit. They were on some really weirdass unlikely label and did more than one album. But geez, who will buy, as that song said.

I actually have a good bit by Lighthouse.  And it was a GREAT 45 hit in 1971.  Evolution Records in the USA, GRT in their native Canada.  Skip Prokop had been in the Paupers (of Monterey Pop Festival infamy).

 

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Yeah, Evolution, that was the label. The only other stuff on that label I saw in stores at the time were a few old radio shows. But as it turns out, they were a deep repository for Gloria Loring pleasurements!

https://www.discogs.com/label/58818-Evolution-3?page=1

The Longines Symphonette society!

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2 hours ago, felser said:

  Skip Prokop had been in the Paupers (of Monterey Pop Festival infamy).

 

 What was infamous about The Paupers at Monterey?  BTW  Academy award winner Howard Shore played in Lighthouse.   Two other Canadian band I liked form the '60s were Kensington Market and Chilliwack. (Hmmm: both are place names. ) 

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Posted (edited)

17 minutes ago, medjuck said:

 What was infamous about The Paupers at Monterey?  BTW  Academy award winner Howard Shore played in Lighthouse.   Two other Canadian band I liked form the '60s were Kensington Market and Chilliwack. (Hmmm: both are place names. ) 

Here's an article about their set followed by a youtube posting of my favorite song by them - perfect for 1967 rock.  You can hear how tight they could be.

https://www.nicholasjennings.com/music-feature-the-paupers-at-monterey-pop

Monterey was a big deal for The Paupers after their Café Au Go-Go showstopper. The group spent two weeks rehearsing for the festival, working out a strong, twenty-minute medley of their best numbers. The chance to blow away the competition looked good when the band was scheduled to follow mellow popsters The Association. David Crosby hyped The Paupers in his rave introduction, calling them the best thing heʼd ever heard. “Just watch,” he told the crowd of 30,000, “youʼre going to be amazed.”

The minute The Paupers kicked into their set, everything seemed to go terribly wrong. First of all, guitarist Chuck Bealʼs amp crapped out, then came back on, emitting an odious, sputtering noise. To make matters worse, Denny Gerrardʼs bass playing seemed strangely out of sync. The problem may possibly have been a batch of LSD circulating at Monterey, likely Purple Haze tabs from Owsleyʼs infamous lab. According to Pauper Adam Mitchell, Gerrard had dropped some acid just before going on-stage, and wound up marching to the beat of his own drummer. Says Mitchell: “Denny was probably the best bass player who ever lived, certainly at that time. But on this particular day, he totally fucked up.”

Many of the Monterey acts blew peopleʼs minds. The Paupers simply blew it. Ralph Gleason, influential music columnist with the San Francisco Chronicle, called the band one of the festivalʼs real disappointments. (Gleason had already been a champion of Gerrardʼs talents in Playboy, where the musician had twice been voted top bassist in the magazineʼs annual jazz poll.) And, perhaps most significantly, the groupʼs performance was not included in Monterey Pop, the seminal rockumentary by D.A. Pennebaker that helped to make superstars out of Hendrix and Joplin.

 

Edited by felser

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Thanks. Never knew that.  IIRC they were really hyped by the Village Voice which was my bible at the time. 

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19 hours ago, Dave James said:

Here are a few other lesser known 60's bands and artists worthy of a second look:

Camel

Rare Bird

Upp

Three Man Army

Pink Fairies

Blodwyn Pig

Bebop Deluxe

Cold Blood

Sons of Champlin

Dan Hicks & His Hot Licks

Moby Grape

Batdorf & Rodney (the latter was the son of Red Rodney)

Shawn Phillips

ian Matthews (w/ and w/o Southern Comfort)

Pacific Gas & Electric

Kalapana

The Blues Project

 

 

 

Actually Moby Grape is one of my favourite psychedelic rock bands! I own most if not all their discs (my database is not handy now).

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I haven’t listened to them in god knows when but I remember Pacific Gas and Electric as being very good.  

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Posted (edited)

5 minutes ago, Brad said:

I haven’t listened to them in god knows when but I remember Pacific Gas and Electric as being very good.  

One of the greatest of 1971:  "Brothers and sisters, I have many struggling along to do their thing.  Love is a song, it's better than any, it's powerful music but it's easy to sing...".  Boy, I miss the music of those times.

 

Edited by felser

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Yeah, three blatant phallic symbols asking the scantily clad chick if she's ready.

I'm sure she was ready - to get the fuck outta there.

Love!

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Some great music. Yeah, those times were special. The anniversary brings it all back. 

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1 hour ago, JSngry said:

Yeah, three blatant phallic symbols asking the scantily clad chick if she's ready.

I'm sure she was ready - to get the *** outta there.

Love!

And yet the song itself is about the second coming of Jesus.  Thank you, Columbia Records Art Department. 

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Posted (edited)

On the eve of the 50th anniversary of the Woodstock Music & Arts Festival, let's take a moment to remember its opening act, the great, wholly unique and, IMO, under-appreciated Richie Havens:

 

Edited by Dave James

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Posted (edited)

9 hours ago, Dave James said:

On the eve of the 50th anniversary of the Woodstock Music & Arts Festival, let's take a moment to remember its opening act, the great, wholly unique and, IMO, under-appreciated Richie Havens:

 

:tup:tup:tup  Met him once when he played Upper Merion Concerts Under The Stars, about two blocks from my house.  He was wonderful musically and personally, so very kind to our obviously adopted daughter, who was about 10 at the time.   Have his autograph ("to my good friends, the Felser's) in his autobiography.  Got to see him live three times overall, always a delight.  "Freedom" is the #1 highlight of the whole Woodstock Festival for me.

Edited by felser

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38 minutes ago, felser said:

:tup:tup:tup  Met him once when he played Upper Merion Concerts Under The Stars, about two blocks from my house.  He was wonderful musically and personally, so very kind to our obviously adopted daughter, who was about 10 at the time.   Have his autograph ("to my good friends, the Felser's) in his autobiography.  Got to see him live three times overall, always a delight.  "Freedom" is the #1 highlight of the whole Woodstock Festival for me.

On a recent PBS documentary about Woodstock you hear him say that he improvised Freedom on the spot to entertain the crowd while they tried to get other performers to the site.   . 

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