HutchFan

Playing Favorites: Reflections on Jazz in the 1970s

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54 minutes ago, JSngry said:

That almost sounds like a Maynard track!

Never really thought of it that way.  But I suppose so. :P

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It was "in the air" as they say, a good example of the cross-pollination that we like about that time in music.

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What about Yosuke Yamashita's Chiasma as a choice for a free blow out? My friend brought it back from Japan for me, and my limited understanding is it's a Japanese free jazz classic in terms of being pivotal to that scene.  It's a great wild ride when I'm in the mood for it.

Edited by CJ Shearn

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On 4/30/2020 at 10:31 AM, CJ Shearn said:

What about Yosuke Yamashita's Chiasma as a choice for a free blow out? My friend brought it back from Japan for me, and my limited understanding is it's a Japanese free jazz classic in terms of being pivotal to that scene.  It's a great wild ride when I'm in the mood for it.

I'm not familiar with that one, CJ.  I'll check it out! 👍

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2 hours ago, HutchFan said:

I'm not familiar with that one, CJ.  I'll check it out! 👍

Definitely Cecil ish

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Weekly Recap - PLAYING FAVORITES: Reflections on Jazz in the 1970s

Carlos Garnett – Black Love (Muse, 1974)

Ella Fitzgerald – Fine and Mellow (Pablo, 1979)

Al Haig Trio – Invitation (Spotlite, 1975)

Larry Young – Lawrence of Newark (Perception, 1973)

Larry Willis – Inner Crisis (Groove Merchant, 1973)

Jack Wilkins – Windows (Mainstream, 1973)

Tito Puente – Tito Puente and His Concert Orchestra (Tico, 1973)

 

No write-ups this week. :( 

We've now advanced to recordings made in 1974.

 

Edited by HutchFan

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Those are all good records, but none are anything I'd agitate for if a good friend didn't already have them, excpet maybe the Ella, and then only if there was already othr stuff there already. Probably the same thing with Lawrence Of Newark, yes it needs to be heard and should not be forgotten, but since the focus here seem to be things recorded in the 70s, not necessarily released then (apologies if I'm getting that wrong?)...

R-1049001-1557582302-2901.jpeg.jpg

Hey, dig this:

R-1049001-1557582449-2522.jpeg.jpg

They was afraid that they was gonna be levitated!!!!!!!

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I own and like the Garnett, Young, Willis, and Wilkens.

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For me it's the Al Haig that I like the best.

The Ella is the other one  that I find appealing. Of course the terrific group of sidemen with Ella - Sweets, Clark Terry, Zoot, Lockjaw, Joe Pass, Tommy Flanagan Ray Brown and Louis Bellson add a great deal to that session.

 

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1 hour ago, Peter Friedman said:

For me it's the Al Haig that I like the best.

...

 

That Al Haig album is awesome, close to desert island material for me.

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I'm glad to hear that some of you agree with me about that Al Haig LP.  IMO, it's a tremendous record, and tremendously overlooked.  You might say the same thing about most of Haig's records from the 1970s.  They are really, really good -- and no one seems to talk about them.  Along with Invitation, I'm especially partial to Piano Interpretation and Interplay (both on Seabreeze), Duke n Bird (Eastwind), and Ornithology (Progressive).

I feel the same way about the Larry Willis LP.  It's another hidden gem.  After the opening cut (which is a little bit generic, but only a little), I feel like the "real" Larry Willis comes out.  Unstoppable lyricism. ... And totally at odds with the tough guy image he projects on the album cover.  

Love that Tito Puente too. It's a HARD DRIVING Latin Jazz classic!

Well, I guess I love all of them. ;) 

 

Jim - I'll keep an eye out for Love Cry Want.  Looks very interesting.

 

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I've really been enjoying this blog. Old friends and new acquaintances.  

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Until tonight, I hadn't touched my blog for a month.  Too much work.  Too much stress.  Too many apocalyptic distractions.  But I've managed to "catch up" -- at least partially.  There's little or no commentary.  But the titles, personnel, and recording dates are finally out there.  Album cover pix too.

Anyhow, here's what I've got . . .

 

Recap - PLAYING FAVORITES: Reflections on Jazz in the 1970s

Shirley Scott – One for Me (Strata-East, 1974)

Billy Cobham – Crosswinds (Atlantic, 1974)

Irene Kral – Where Is Love? (Choice, 1975)

Charles Mingus – Changes One (Atlantic, 1975) and Changes Two (Atlantic, 1975)

Count Basie & Oscar Peterson – "Satch" and "Josh" (Pablo, 1975)

Harold Vick – Don't Look Back (Strata-East, 1974)

Joe Bonner – The Lifesaver (Muse, 1975)

The Modern Jazz Quartet – The Complete Last Concert (Atlantic, 1975)

Jackie McLean & the Cosmic Brotherhood – New York Calling (SteepleChase/Inner City, 1975)

Bobby Vince Paunetto – Paunetto's Point (Pathfinder/RSVP, 1975)

Dusko Goykovich – Slavic Mood (RCA Italy, 1975)

Keith Jarrett – Death & the Flower / Backhand (Impulse, 1975)

Lee Konitz – Satori (Milestone, 1975)

Toots Thielemans – Captured Alive aka Images (Choice, 1974)

Bobby Jones – Hill Country Suite (Enja, 1974)

Randy Weston – Blues to Africa (Freedom/Arista-Freedom, 1975)

Jimmy Raney – Momentum (MPS/PAUSA, 1975)

Budd Johnson – Mr. Bechet (Black & Blue, 1974)

Oregon – Winter Light (Vanguard, 1974)

Eddie Harris – I Need Some Money (Atlantic/Collectables, 1975)

Sonny Rollins – The Cutting Edge (Milestone, 1974)

Jimmy Heath – The Time and the Place (Landmark, 1994)

Kenny Drew Trio – Dark Beauty (SteepleChase/Inner City, 1974)

Willis Jackson – Headed and Gutted (Muse, 1974)

Bobby Hutcherson – Cirrus (Blue Note, 1974)

Roswell Rudd – Flexible Flyer (Arista-Freedom/Black Lion, 1975)

Bennie Maupin – The Jewel in the Lotus (ECM, 1974)

Earl Hines – One for My Baby (Black Lion, 1978) and Master of Jazz, Vol. 2 (Storyville, 1984)

Phineas Newborn, Jr. – Piano Solo (Atlantic/32 Jazz, 1975)

Teddy Wilson – Striding After Fats (Black Lion, 1974)

 

Coincidentally, every one of these recordings were made in 1974.

 

 

 

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The Vick and the Bonner are long overdue for CD issue and I look forward to the Scott CD.  Love many of the other titles including the Cobham.   That is my go-to MJQ

 

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6 hours ago, HutchFan said:

Until tonight, I hadn't touched my blog for a month.  Too much work.  Too much stress.  Too many apocalyptic distractions.  But I've managed to "catch up" -- at least partially.  

Thank you. Good to hear it - I was getting worried that that would be it. 

I've been mining the last few months for new recommendations as well as listening ideas for old friends. It's a really fantastic resource that you are creating.

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Bobby Hutcherson – Cirrus (Blue Note, 1974)   This is a fine album, but it still ain't Dialogue, not hardly.

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I always think of 'Dialogue' as much a Hill album as Bobby H's

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11 hours ago, Rabshakeh said:

Thank you. Good to hear it - I was getting worried that that would be it. 

I've been mining the last few months for new recommendations as well as listening ideas for old friends. It's a really fantastic resource that you are creating.

I'm glad you're enjoying it, Rabshekeh. :tup 

I'm disappointed that I haven't had the energy or time to do more write-ups. 

But I'm committed to at least posting the "bare bones" through the end of the year.

 

 

10 hours ago, danasgoodstuff said:

Bobby Hutcherson – Cirrus (Blue Note, 1974)   This is a fine album, but it still ain't Dialogue, not hardly.

It's not Dialogue. You're right.  But neither is Dialogue Cirrus.  I don't think one is "better" than the other.  They're different. 

Also, I have to admit that I sorta think of Dialogue as an Andrew Hill record as much as a Bobby Hutcherson record.  Hill wrote four of the six compositions (on the CD version), and Joe Chambers composed the other two.  Bobby didn't contribute any.

As a Bobby Hutcherson fan, I LOVE Dialogue.  But I feel that albums like Happenings or Stick-Up! are more "representative" of Bobby at his best in the 1960s.

Also, if I were taking a handful of Hutch records to a desert-island, Cirrus would definitely be coming with me.  Dialogue... probably not.

Just my take, of course.

 

Edited by HutchFan

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7 hours ago, mjazzg said:

I always think of 'Dialogue' as much a Hill album as Bobby H's

Looks like we're in agreement. ;) 

I hadn't even seen your response when I replied to danasgoodstuff!

 

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On 6/5/2020 at 9:39 AM, HutchFan said:

I'm glad you're enjoying it, Rabshekeh. :tup 

I'm disappointed that I haven't had the energy or time to do more write-ups. 

But I'm committed to at least posting the "bare bones" through the end of the year.

 

 

It's not Dialogue. You're right.  But neither is Dialogue Cirrus.  I don't think one is "better" than the other.  They're different. 

Also, I have to admit that I sorta think of Dialogue as an Andrew Hill record as much as a Bobby Hutcherson record.  Hill wrote four of the six compositions (on the CD version), and Joe Chambers composed the other two.  Bobby didn't contribute any.

As a Bobby Hutcherson fan, I LOVE Dialogue.  But I feel that albums like Happenings or Stick-Up! are more "representative" of Bobby at his best in the 1960s.

Also, if I were taking a handful of Hutch records to a desert-island, Cirrus would definitely be coming with me.  Dialogue... probably not.

Just my take, of course.

 

Oh I agree that Dialogue is as much Hill's and Chambers' record as Hutcherson's, that's part of what made Blue Note in the '50 & '60s what it was.  And Sam Rivers and Richard Davis.  Yes there are more typical/more purely Hutch records, but Dialogue benefits from its collaborative nature.  There certainly are fine recordings in the '70s, but to me they are just scattered islands of excellence without a center or a direction.  YMMV.

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2 hours ago, danasgoodstuff said:

Oh I agree that Dialogue is as much Hill's and Chambers' record as Hutcherson's, that's part of what made Blue Note in the '50 & '60s what it was.  And Sam Rivers and Richard Davis.  Yes there are more typical/more purely Hutch records, but Dialogue benefits from its collaborative nature.  There certainly are fine recordings in the '70s, but to me they are just scattered islands of excellence without a center or a direction.  YMMV.

Sure thing. 

Diff strokes for diff folks.  And that is A-O.K.  :tup 

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On 05/06/2020 at 5:54 PM, HutchFan said:

Looks like we're in agreement. ;) 

I hadn't even seen your response when I replied to danasgoodstuff!

 

Great minds...:D

Edited by mjazzg

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On 6/4/2020 at 4:09 PM, HutchFan said:

Until tonight, I hadn't touched my blog for a month.  Too much work.  Too much stress.  Too many apocalyptic distractions.  But I've managed to "catch up" -- at least partially.  There's little or no commentary.  But the titles, personnel, and recording dates are finally out there.  Album cover pix too.

Anyhow, here's what I've got . . .

 

Recap - PLAYING FAVORITES: Reflections on Jazz in the 1970s

Shirley Scott – One for Me (Strata-East, 1974)

Billy Cobham – Crosswinds (Atlantic, 1974)

Irene Kral – Where Is Love? (Choice, 1975)

Charles Mingus – Changes One (Atlantic, 1975) and Changes Two (Atlantic, 1975)

Count Basie & Oscar Peterson – "Satch" and "Josh" (Pablo, 1975)

Harold Vick – Don't Look Back (Strata-East, 1974)

Joe Bonner – The Lifesaver (Muse, 1975)

The Modern Jazz Quartet – The Complete Last Concert (Atlantic, 1975)

Jackie McLean & the Cosmic Brotherhood – New York Calling (SteepleChase/Inner City, 1975)

Bobby Vince Paunetto – Paunetto's Point (Pathfinder/RSVP, 1975)

Dusko Goykovich – Slavic Mood (RCA Italy, 1975)

Keith Jarrett – Death & the Flower / Backhand (Impulse, 1975)

Lee Konitz – Satori (Milestone, 1975)

Toots Thielemans – Captured Alive aka Images (Choice, 1974)

Bobby Jones – Hill Country Suite (Enja, 1974)

Randy Weston – Blues to Africa (Freedom/Arista-Freedom, 1975)

Jimmy Raney – Momentum (MPS/PAUSA, 1975)

Budd Johnson – Mr. Bechet (Black & Blue, 1974)

Oregon – Winter Light (Vanguard, 1974)

Eddie Harris – I Need Some Money (Atlantic/Collectables, 1975)

Sonny Rollins – The Cutting Edge (Milestone, 1974)

Jimmy Heath – The Time and the Place (Landmark, 1994)

Kenny Drew Trio – Dark Beauty (SteepleChase/Inner City, 1974)

Willis Jackson – Headed and Gutted (Muse, 1974)

Bobby Hutcherson – Cirrus (Blue Note, 1974)

Roswell Rudd – Flexible Flyer (Arista-Freedom/Black Lion, 1975)

Bennie Maupin – The Jewel in the Lotus (ECM, 1974)

Earl Hines – One for My Baby (Black Lion, 1978) and Master of Jazz, Vol. 2 (Storyville, 1984)

Phineas Newborn, Jr. – Piano Solo (Atlantic/32 Jazz, 1975)

Teddy Wilson – Striding After Fats (Black Lion, 1974)

 

Coincidentally, every one of these recordings were made in 1974.

 

 

 

There are quite a few on this list that I particularly like.

Basie & Peterson - Satch & Josh,  Kenny Drew - Dark Beauty,  - Irene Kral - Where Is Love, Jimmy Raney - Momentum, and  Modern Jazz Quartet - Complete Last Concert

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Curious why that MJQ record?

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4 hours ago, JSngry said:

Curious why that MJQ record?

The band's performance seems inspired.

What would your 70s MJQ choice be?

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