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GA Russell

Baritone Madness

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Selective Hearing

Chronograph Records

 
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Baritone Madness
"Baritone Madness"

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Format(s): Jazz, Smooth Jazz

 
 
 

 

Already #1 at CDN campus/community jazz radio

"Moanin" and "I Hear A Rhapsody" added at CBC Saturday Night Jazz

Played summer jazz festivals in Montreal, Ottawa and Edmonton

Biography

Baritone Madness was formed by Pat Belliveau, Keith O’Rourke, and Gareth Bane to bring the magic of the baritone saxophone to audiences across North America.

Pat Belliveau is a Canadian saxophonist who has played with artists such as Herbie Hancock, Harry Connick Jr., The New York Voices and Nikki Yanofsky. He has played on over 50 records and has released two albums as a leader, La Zona Blanca and The Pat Belliveau Quintet Live in Panama. 

Keith O’Rourke is a born and raised Albertan. He released his debut album Sketches from the Road in 2017. Keith is the co-leader of the Past Present Quintet and a member of the Prime Time Big Band. He also plays with Calgary Jazz Orchestra, the Calgary Creative Arts Ensemble and Stage West Calgary.

Since returning to Alberta from New York City in 2011 after taking his Masters in Jazz Performance at Rutgers University, Gareth Bane has continued to push the boundaries of the baritone saxophone. Modern improvisational jazz concepts and the roots of blues, combined with a “take no prisoners” approach to the horn, thus creating a unique and powerful voice on that instrument.

 

About This Release

Baritone Madness is a highly unique configuration; a quintet comprised of three baritone saxophonists as leads, supported by a rhythm section of double bass and drums. These players have captivated audiences through their inventive originals and thoughtful arrangements of music by Gerry Mulligan, Pepper Adams and Hamiett Bluiett that complement the low range of the baritone sax. As a group they have been playing together for enthusiastic audiences since they began in February of 2016. In 2019, they took to the road to share their new music with fans at Montreal International Jazz Festival, TD Ottawa Jazz Festival and TD Edmonton International Jazz Festival. Their first release and self-titled album, is set to be released on September 13, 2019 through Chronograph Records. 

 

 

 

 
  Artist Title Time    
 
 
 
  Baritone Madness Moanin' 04:13 cancon.png  
  Baritone Madness Remembering the Aramo 06:28 cancon.png  
  Baritone Madness I-Yor 03:59 cancon.png  
  Baritone Madness Port NOLA 04:25 cancon.png  
  Baritone Madness Turbulant Trane 04:23 cancon.png  
  Baritone Madness Requested 05:19 cancon.png  
  Baritone Madness I Hear a Rhapsody 04:05 cancon.png  
  Baritone Madness A Long Time Coming 04:40 cancon.png  
  Baritone Madness The C.B. Shuffle 05:03 cancon.png  
  Baritone Madness The Angels' Share 05:56 cancon.png  
  Baritone Madness June 05:01 cancon.png  
  Baritone Madness Ready and Able 04:13 cancon.png  
 
 
 

 

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Format says "smooth jazz"!?!

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A worthy project for sure, one I would like to hear. The three baritone band with bass and drums has a precedent.  

   Plays Mulligan (feat. Ronnie Cuber, Nick Brignola & Gary Smulyan)

 

 

Edited by John Tapscott

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This one adds a piano:

brigno_nick_burnbriga_101b.jpg

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This British CD features 7 Baritone sax players. But only 4 play at a time on any track.81vb4yObryL._AC_UY218_ML3_.jpg

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I'll settle for "Prima Bara Dubla" featuring Carney and Mulligan on this one:

R-5260946-1388964680-4540.jpeg.jpg

 

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When I think of Baritone Madness I think of Nick Brignola’s recording on the Bee Hive label. 

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2 hours ago, Brad said:

When I think of Baritone Madness I think of Nick Brignola’s recording on the Bee Hive label. 

What I thoughtt of when I read the topic.

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Ewww, three baritone saxophones in one sitting? No, thanks.

At least, the picture John posted has the proper model, without that horrible extension. (Gerry Mulligan, Pepper Adams and Danny Bank hated it and refused to play it.)

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it's a tough instrument to listen to on a small group record where it's the only horn for an extended period of time. A friend gave me a CD like that, and after half an hour or so, I just couldn't take it anymore, and literally had to turn it off. Mulligan or Pepper Adams could pull it off, because of their sound and ideas, but other than them, the range and power of the horn can be too much, especially if the player is trying to see how many notes he can cram into a measure.

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5 hours ago, sgcim said:

it's a tough instrument to listen to on a small group record where it's the only horn for an extended period of time. A friend gave me a CD like that, and after half an hour or so, I just couldn't take it anymore, and literally had to turn it off. Mulligan or Pepper Adams could pull it off, because of their sound and ideas, but other than them, the range and power of the horn can be too much, especially if the player is trying to see how many notes he can cram into a measure.

Do you feel the same about Sonny Stitt or Leo Parker?

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Much as I enjoy Cuber, Brignola and Smulyan individually, all together on the Three Baritone Saxophone CD I posted (esp. with no piano) is too much. Can't say I really love that CD. 

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10 hours ago, sgcim said:

it's a tough instrument to listen to on a small group record where it's the only horn for an extended period of time. A friend gave me a CD like that, and after half an hour or so, I just couldn't take it anymore, and literally had to turn it off. Mulligan or Pepper Adams could pull it off, because of their sound and ideas, but other than them, the range and power of the horn can be too much, especially if the player is trying to see how many notes he can cram into a measure.

I firmly disagree. The issue is the musician, not the baritone saxophone.   My preference would be for more players to choose the baritone sax. When you consider the plethora of alto and tenor players out there, the number of baritone sax players on the scene is tiny.

(To be honest though, I am a bit of a hypocrite, as I am not a fan of the soprano sax with only a very few exceptions.)

 

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Just 3?

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R-7613736-1445173207-6692.jpeg.jpgR-7613736-1445173209-7628.jpeg.jpg

 

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18 minutes ago, JSngry said:

Just 3?

R-7363580-1439851243-4966.jpeg.jpg

R-7363580-1439851246-1703.jpeg.jpg

R-7613736-1445173207-6692.jpeg.jpgR-7613736-1445173209-7628.jpeg.jpg

 

Do you have that record? It must be pretty rare.

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Must respectfully disagree about Pepper Adams.  I love his work, but this album, with just him and a rhythm section on 4 long cuts, is an effort to get through:

R-4282353-1360608388-2191.jpeg.jpg

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24 minutes ago, kh1958 said:

Do you have that record? It must be pretty rare.

I have a "copy" of the Art Yard reissue.

It's not bad. It's not great, either. The writing's good, though.

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8 hours ago, Brad said:

Do you feel the same about Sonny Stitt or Leo Parker?

That's a good point, KCR is playing a retrospective on Leo Parker now, and I' really digging it. Pat Patrick, Mulligan, Leo Parker, guys who didn't pay a million notes per second, and kept a lighter sound are okay with me. Even Pepper Adams can be a bit much, as mjzee mentioned above, when he's the only horn on the record. I've never heard Stitt play Bari.

It's just the nature of the instrument. It's timbre can be unbearable in large, uninterrupted doses.

They're all brilliant musicians, but timbre is an important consideration.

Edited by sgcim

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2 hours ago, mjzee said:

Must respectfully disagree about Pepper Adams.  I love his work, but this album, with just him and a rhythm section on 4 long cuts, is an effort to get through:

R-4282353-1360608388-2191.jpeg.jpg

Though there are certainly exceptions, I find most (Jazz) albums with 4 or fewer long cuts are often tedious. It makes no difference as to the instruments involved. 

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This is my favorite Pepper Adams album, overall. Well-programmed to be a "record" more than a "document".

 

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27 minutes ago, JSngry said:

This is my favorite Pepper Adams album, overall. Well-programmed to be a "record" more than a "document".

 

I like Critics' Choice.

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I don't find the bari tedious at all. I do love Nick Brignola's "all bari" CDs, "Flight of the Eagle" and my favorite "On A Different Level". Serge Chaloff's "Blue Serge" is played quite often. The aforementioned Leo Parker's Blue Note dates are great. Gary Smulyan has made some beautiful dates. Pepper Adams' "The Master" is aptly named.  I love bari sax dates. To each his own...

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❤Lars Gullin❤Mario Rivera❤Charles Davis❤ ....

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