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jtaylor

Unidentified UK Publication - 1954

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Does anybody recognize what publication this May 1954 article may be from? It is almost certainly from the UK, but it isn't any of Melody Maker, New Musical Express, Jazz Journal, or many others that I've searched, and I'm struggling to figure out where it comes from. Need it for a book footnote.

Not seen, but the date appears in the lower left corner as: MAY, 1954

Many thanks.

Screen-Shot-2020-01-03-at-5-39-53-PM.png

Edited by jtaylor

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I have a stack of Jazz Monthlies from the 50s and early 60s, and assuming that they had a monthly publishing policy right from the start they were not around yet in May, 1954. The earliest Issue I have is October, 1955, and that is labeled as Vol. 1, no. 8. So ...

Besides, the layout does not match that of those early Jazz Monthly issues. They had a 2 columns per page layout throughout.

But I'd be interested in finding out where this came from too -  for the rest of the review in the upper left corner. Wynonie Harris? Joe Carroll? Merrill Moore? What record??

 

Edited by Big Beat Steve

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12 hours ago, jtaylor said:

 and I'm struggling to figure out where it comes from. Need it for a book footnote.

 

Re- how to quote in such a case, while I cannot give the answer that would satisfy the most scholarly of scholars, you are far from the first to be confronted with such a problem. Source documents that have survived only as photocopies (maybe dating back to the days when they were called "photostats"), scans etc. with no identifiable printed source are not rare and I do remember having seen them used in books anyway, particulary on niche or poorly documented topics. IMO a valid way of quoting from this article in your case (as a last resort) would be "Arthur Jackson in unidentified UK publication, May 1954".

Edited by Big Beat Steve

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4 hours ago, Big Beat Steve said:

Re- how to quote in such a case, while I cannot give the answer that would satisfy the most scholarly of scholars, you are far from the first to be confronted with such a problem. Source documents that have survived only as photocopies (maybe dating back to the days when they were called "photostats"), scans etc. with no identifiable printed source are not rare and I do remember having seen them used in books anyway, particulary on niche or poorly documented topics. IMO a valid way of quoting from this article in your case (as a last resort) would be "Arthur Jackson in unidentified UK publication, May 1954".

I appreciate the responses, thank you. If I am unable to find the original source -- which is likely the case at this point -- then a citation much like the one you propose will have to suffice. I contacted the UK's National Jazz Archive as a last option ... so hopefully then can help.

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Have you considered Gramophone?  There's an archive, but it requires a subscription.  Perhaps someone here has access.

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1 hour ago, jazztrain said:

Have you considered Gramophone?  There's an archive, but it requires a subscription.  Perhaps someone here has access.

I think you might be on to something, if I can just find the May 1954 issue to confirm. https://thumbs.worthpoint.com/zoom/images1/360/0815/23/magazine-gramophone-record-articles_360_e74abb0fef66a10ec994fddf9cbef890.jpg

Became The Gramophone Record Review in November 1953. 

Edited by jtaylor

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Looking at the font, ‘Gramophone’ would indeed be a good suggestion.

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I've only known Gramophone as a classical music publication, so my bad?

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4 minutes ago, JSngry said:

I've only known Gramophone as a classical music publication, so my bad?

In earlier years, they also had a section on jazz LP reviews.

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While this "Gramophone" did include reviews of classical -- as well as jazz and pop -- I don't believe it's the Gramophone that is strictly classical and still around today. The Gramophone Record Review appears to have run until 1961, at which point it became the Record Review

I did see a reference to an Arthur Jackson review of Lonnie Donnegan from 1956, so TGRR appears the best bet at the moment.

Edited by jtaylor

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That’s the same reference that I had found while looking for information on Jackson. 

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Recently got rid of a bunch of Gramophones (classical variety) and remember a jazz review column in  the '70s.

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Not sure this would work but might be worth a shot. . .   Have you tried putting some chunks of the article into Google?  It's possible that a segment of the article has been quoted by someone else and that that someone gives a concrete source.

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14 hours ago, sidewinder said:

In earlier years, they also had a section on jazz LP reviews.

Brian Rust, he of the discographies, used to write Traditional Jazz reviews using the pseudonym "Oliver King"

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14 hours ago, DIS said:

Not sure this would work but might be worth a shot. . .   Have you tried putting some chunks of the article into Google?  It's possible that a segment of the article has been quoted by someone else and that that someone gives a concrete source.

Yeah, came up empty.

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Here's something else that I found.  The ellipses are intriguing and frustrating!

>>>

Jazzbook 1955: With 17 Pages of Half-tone Illustrations

 - Page 165

Albert J. McCarthy - 1955 - ‎Snippet view
FOUND INSIDE - PAGE 165

THE GRAMOPHONE Price 1/-. Published monthly from 49 Ebrington Road, Kenton, ... Includes photographs. Every record is reviewed and jazz reviews are handled by Arthur Jackson, Albert McCarthy and others. Leonard Hibbs is well known ...

>>>

 

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45 minutes ago, jazztrain said:

Here's something else that I found.  The ellipses are intriguing and frustrating!

>>>

Jazzbook 1955: With 17 Pages of Half-tone Illustrations

 - Page 165

Albert J. McCarthy - 1955 - ‎Snippet view
FOUND INSIDE - PAGE 165

THE GRAMOPHONE Price 1/-. Published monthly from 49 Ebrington Road, Kenton, ... Includes photographs. Every record is reviewed and jazz reviews are handled by Arthur Jackson, Albert McCarthy and others. Leonard Hibbs is well known ...

>>>

 

Nice, thanks. I do think that's the correct publication but would love to actually track down the issue in question to confirm.

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4 hours ago, jazztrain said:

Looks like there's a copy of the May 1954 issue available for sale here:  https://www.ebay.com/itm/Gramophone-1954-03-05-07-08-March-May-July-August-Your-choice-discounts-/303116242661

Perhaps the seller would be willing to look to see if the article is in the May 1954 issue for you.

Man, I thought you had it! Unfortunately, I think that's a different publication than the one I'm after. 

Trinity College Dublin looks like the may have it. I'll reach out to them, but I have to quit if they can't confirm.

Edited by jtaylor

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On 5.1.2020 at 9:56 PM, jazztrain said:

Here's something else that I found.  The ellipses are intriguing and frustrating!

>>>

Jazzbook 1955: With 17 Pages of Half-tone Illustrations

 - Page 165

Albert J. McCarthy - 1955 - ‎Snippet view
FOUND INSIDE - PAGE 165

THE GRAMOPHONE Price 1/-. Published monthly from 49 Ebrington Road, Kenton, ... Includes photographs. Every record is reviewed and jazz reviews are handled by Arthur Jackson, Albert McCarthy and others. Leonard Hibbs is well known ...

>>>

 

The quote is a bit misleading as it combines text splinters for BOTH "Gramophones" that there were.

Here is the FULL text: ;)

37615055bh.jpg

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I have received confirmation, from the State Library of Victoria (Australia) of all places, that this article did in fact appear in The Gramophone Record Review. Many thanks for all the help and suggestions -- I never would have thought of this one on my own. 

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