ghost of miles

COVID-19 2.0: No Politics edition

545 posts in this topic

The deli guy must have touched/adjusted his mask 5 times with the same hand/glove he touched my deli meat 

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On 4/9/2020 at 1:50 PM, page said:

Hi guys/galls,
just wanted to say and wave "hi" to you all from the isolation here!
Wishing you the best of health and happiness for you and all of your loved ones!
Take care,
page

Wishing you the best right back at you page. ALL the best. Stay healthy and safe!

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4 hours ago, bresna said:

BTW - did any of you know that having a cortisone shot in the last 3 months puts you at a higher risk of death from COVID-19? I didn't know that until one of my Facebook friends mentioned it. I

Did they cite any sources for this claim? Looking on the Instanets right now and not seeing anything to confirm that.

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1 hour ago, JSngry said:

Did they cite any sources for this claim? Looking on the Instanets right now and not seeing anything to confirm that.

Cortisone is an anti inflammatory and anti inflammatories, particularly NSAIDs (non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs) are thought to exacerbate the effects of the virus. I have avoided all pain relievers other than Tylenol. 

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It seems that there's still not a clear/conclusive view on that:

https://www.idse.net/Covid-19/Article/03-20/New-Guidelines-Released-for-Managing-COVID-19-Patients/57722

on the one hand:

“Traditionally, there’s been an association between using systemic corticosteroids and higher risk of death in patients with viral pneumonia, but this association is based on observational studies, which may be confounded by the fact that sicker patients tend to receive corticosteroids,” Dr. Alhazzani explained. “Very limited data” from COVID-19 patients, as well as data from SARS and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) also indicate treatment with systemic corticosteroids may cause harm.

“Because of the limitations of the data and because we’re not sure what the effect of systemic steroid treatment is in COVID-19 patients, we issued a weak recommendation not to use systemic corticosteroids in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia,” he said.

but on the other hand:

At the same time, there is a “decent” amount of indirect evidence from randomized controlled trials in the general critically ill population with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) that has consistently shown use of systemic corticosteroids reduces the duration of mechanical ventilation and death.

“In addition, a recent observational study from China suggested that the use of corticosteroids may reduce mortality in COVID-19 patients with ARDS, so we issued a weak recommendation that in those with moderate to severe ARDS and COVID-19, you might consider using systemic corticosteroids,” Dr. Alhazzani said.

I would certainly err on the side of caution, if I had a choice!

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That is what I have done. For me, acetaminophen (Tylenol) does very little; I find aspirin more effective. However, I’m trying to avoid aspirin where I possibly can. 

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High profile deaths of young sheriff’s deputies and health care workers in South Florida show the infectious virus can strike seemingly healthy adults. Yet the data now reveals that in 86% of cases where COVID-19 took the life of someone under 60 in Broward and Dade, that person also had a chronic disease like obesity, HIV, cancer or asthma.

 

...

About 87% of people killed by COVID-19 in Broward and about 95% in Miami-Dade were already battling other chronic diseases. In Palm Beach County, that data was not available, but the medical examiner’s office estimated that a similar percentage of its coronavirus victims also suffered from other illnesses.

https://www.sun-sentinel.com/coronavirus/fl-ne-coronavirus-who-is-it-killing-and-why-20200411-hmr5khrhfzgvbkmlwgfpo5d5nm-story.html

 

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17 hours ago, Dan Gould said:

High profile deaths of young sheriff’s deputies and health care workers in South Florida show the infectious virus can strike seemingly healthy adults. Yet the data now reveals that in 86% of cases where COVID-19 took the life of someone under 60 in Broward and Dade, that person also had a chronic disease like obesity, HIV, cancer or asthma.

 

 

Since about 40% of Americans are obese (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obesity_in_the_United_States), if  you add in the other three chronic illness listed here you're talking about half the country. 

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Posted (edited)

10 hours ago, Guy Berger said:

Grim evidence that the official COVID death count is a significant undercount https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/10/nyregion/new-york-coronavirus-death-count.html

Not the first reputable source I’ve seen that suggests the overall number of deaths and cases in general may be significantly higher than the official totals compiled so far. 

We just had our first official death from the virus here in Monroe County (though it’s likely at least one other person died of it, but the state didn’t grant the county coroner’s request to conduct a posthumous test) and a firefighter in Terre Haute just passed away as well. Indianapolis and upper northwest Indiana (aka “Da Region” or “Chicagoland”) getting hit the hardest here in Indiana.

 

Edited by ghost of miles

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any guesses on when music concerts will be starting back up ?

i saw something yesterday that says maybe Sept / Oct 2021

i hope not 

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Posted (edited)

10 minutes ago, Soulstation1 said:

any guesses on when music concerts will be starting back up ?

i saw something yesterday that says maybe Sept / Oct 2021

i hope not 

Sept/Oct at the earliest, I’m afraid.  Lincoln Center, for example, has cancelled all of its summer programming. Here at IU all summer events have been cancelled; we’re looking at trying to turn our outdoor Jazz In July concert series into Swing In September, but even that looks unlikely right now.

Until a vaccine is manufactured and widely distributed (at least a year away, current consensus seems to be), I really don’t see how any kind of mass events—whether you’re talking 50-100 people in a small club or 50,000 people in a football stadium—are going to be able to be undertaken safely.

Why Sports Aren’t Coming Back Any Time Soon

Edited by ghost of miles

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59 minutes ago, ghost of miles said:

Sept/Oct at the earliest, I’m afraid.  Lincoln Center, for example, has cancelled all of its summer programming. Here at IU all summer events have been cancelled; we’re looking at trying to turn our outdoor Jazz In July concert series into Swing In September, but even that looks unlikely right now.

Until a vaccine is manufactured and widely distributed (at least a year away, current consensus seems to be), I really don’t see how any kind of mass events—whether you’re talking 50-100 people in a small club or 50,000 people in a football stadium—are going to be able to be undertaken safely.

Why Sports Aren’t Coming Back Any Time Soon

That article about sums it up. Throw in concerts, movie and theatre going, basically any large gathering. Economically, I don’t see how some organizations will survive this.  AMC Theatres is facing bankruptcy right now. AMC theaters in talks to hire bankruptcy law firm Weil Gotshal amid coronavirus shutdown

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1 hour ago, ghost of miles said:

Sept/Oct at the earliest, I’m afraid.  Lincoln Center, for example, has cancelled all of its summer programming. Here at IU all summer events have been cancelled; we’re looking at trying to turn our outdoor Jazz In July concert series into Swing In September, but even that looks unlikely right now.

Until a vaccine is manufactured and widely distributed (at least a year away, current consensus seems to be), I really don’t see how any kind of mass events—whether you’re talking 50-100 people in a small club or 50,000 people in a football stadium—are going to be able to be undertaken safely.

Why Sports Aren’t Coming Back Any Time Soon

I think it depends on how effectively you can practice/enforce social distancing in these events.  You could probably seat at some people in any location (and clean thoroughly afterward), but at 6 feet apart it would be a fraction of normal capacity

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We have some friends who are teachers, and they are having a very hard time coping with the online format day after day.  I couldn't do it, find myself sometimes mentally exhausted after leading a single meeting on MS Teams.

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Three more weeks of lockdown for us in the UK. Seems a sensible decision considering the daily death rates. 

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4 minutes ago, mjazzg said:

Three more weeks of lockdown for us in the UK. Seems a sensible decision considering the daily death rates. 

No complaints here !

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1 hour ago, felser said:

We have some friends who are teachers, and they are having a very hard time coping with the online format day after day.  I couldn't do it, find myself sometimes mentally exhausted after leading a single meeting on MS Teams.

I just closed a major transaction on April 10th which pretty much involved a complete buyout of my business partners. I'm in the office every day, but the lawyers, accountants, bank reps, and advisor firm people all working from home made it very excruciating. I've never been though anything else like this before, but I'd have to think it would have been a little smoother if not for the current circumstances.

 

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11 minutes ago, catesta said:

 I've never been though anything else like this before, but I'd have to think it would have been a little smoother if not for the current circumstances.

 

I'm fortunate that I work on a really small team and my work is quite technical, and I don't really have to talk to people on a regular basis.  But there are still a few company-wide WebEx or Teams meetings that I have to participate in, and they are definitely excruciating.  So now to add to the list of twits (along with the people who keep insisting on Replying All "Why am I on this email chain?"), let's add the people who call in and don't put their phone on mute as well as the organizers who don't use the option to remove the beep when people join the call.  9th Circle of Hell for all of them.

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Encouraging news from one treatment study at one hospital (the same study is ongoing elsewhere):

https://www.statnews.com/2020/04/16/early-peek-at-data-on-gilead-coronavirus-drug-suggests-patients-are-responding-to-treatment/

An effective treatment - if the drug won't be impossible to produce in sufficient quantities - would be a game changer in terms of movement toward "normality".

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On 4/16/2020 at 6:14 PM, Dan Gould said:

Encouraging news from one treatment study at one hospital (the same study is ongoing elsewhere):

https://www.statnews.com/2020/04/16/early-peek-at-data-on-gilead-coronavirus-drug-suggests-patients-are-responding-to-treatment/

An effective treatment - if the drug won't be impossible to produce in sufficient quantities - would be a game changer in terms of movement toward "normality".

Keep in mind that this was funded by Gilead, and also that there was no control placebo group, so although it's tempting to jump to conclusions that it is a miracle drug, there's a lot of of testing that still needs to be conducted in controlled trials.

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1 minute ago, GregK said:

Keep in mind that this was funded by Gilead, and also that there was no control placebo group, so although it's tempting to jump to conclusions that it is a miracle drug, there's a lot of of testing that still needs to be conducted in controlled trials.

Yes I understand those caveats. But only two died out of 113 "severe" cases and the rest recovered?  That's pretty damn impressive, now let's see what the other locations report.

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46 minutes ago, GregK said:

Keep in mind that this was funded by Gilead, and also that there was no control placebo group, so although it's tempting to jump to conclusions that it is a miracle drug, there's a lot of of testing that still needs to be conducted in controlled trials.

Not sure I’d want to be in the control group on that one...

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As the article indicates, at this stage, the results are anecdotal at best. Releasing this kind of news is not necessarily a good idea because if subsequent results are disappointing, hopes will be dashed. 

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