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mrjazzman

Ambrose Akinmusire

35 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, jazzbo said:

CJ, I do have wide tastes and parts of this music I do like. I really do like the piano trio backing him on his latest and the live double, I think their playing is very good and I even like a lot of the composition.

It's actually the trumpet playing I don't connect to. Especially the "sounds" he plays instead of notes (how I hear it.) I'm not against abstract/avant garde playing--my best friend in the world, Dave Laczko, is an avant garde trumpeter and I understand and enjoy his work, but I always find that he has melody and lyricism as a component in his playing. I find that a lot less so in much of Akinmusire's leader work. . . .

And as time goes by I do find myself liking "purer jazz" more than "some jazz with big dollops of other music blended in or grafted on" (as the song goes. .. "It could happen to you," in time). But that's not really my issue with his work outside the pentultimate recording. I just honestly don't get into his actual playing.

We're all different and thank goodness.

Sam Harris is a really good player...  hey, as I said before I respect your taste, and the depth of listening you do, so no issues there :)

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3 hours ago, Д.Д. said:

Yes.

I sampled a few of tracks from across his discography - pretty boring player, as far as I am concerned. Sort of unfocused and contrived, no flow, the sound is forced. I don't get it. There are dozens of more interesting players, both young and old (IMHO, of course). Randomly - Jean-Luc Cappozzo: 

      

Interesting, I like a lot of that, just sometimes it sounds affected where the technique gets in the way and becomes too prominent rather than serving the musical idea and flow (something I've always heard in Peter Evans too, too clever by half. less is often more Peter) I'll be investigating this recording more. Thanks

 

I rather suspect this won't change anyone's mind, whichever side of the fence they're standing. But I like it.

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so I just started to listen to On the Tender Spot. This guy is great. And I'm old, but I think he is terrific, terrific ideas, terrific sound.

I think you guys are just jealous because he's more popular than you are.

 

Edited by AllenLowe

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59 minutes ago, mjazzg said:

Interesting, I like a lot of that, just sometimes it sounds affected where the technique gets in the way and becomes too prominent rather than serving the musical idea and flow (something I've always heard in Peter Evans too, too clever by half. less is often more Peter) I'll be investigating this recording more. Thanks

 

I rather suspect this won't change anyone's mind, whichever side of the fence they're standing. But I like it.

I agree with your comments regarding Evans. He is lacking in self editing and restraint. He is awesome as a foil to a saxophonist like Amado or Parker.

 

the playing on the Muthspiel is fine (I feel the same way about the other 4 band members) but the music is not anywhere near my point(s) of interest. Too much restraint, maybe 

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I have nothing against note smearing/note bending per se, but the way Akinmusire does this makes me feel like I'm drowning in a vat of chicken fat.

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5 minutes ago, Larry Kart said:

I have nothing against note smearing/note bending per se, but the way Akinmusire does this makes me feel like I'm drowning in a vat of chicken fat.

I would be into this. Where do I sign up? 

 

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On 9/11/2020 at 7:00 PM, Larry Kart said:

I have nothing against note smearing/note bending per se, but the way Akinmusire does this makes me feel like I'm drowning in a vat of chicken fat.

I've only listened to a little of this guy; is there a particular cut or album where you think he does this in particular?

Edited by AllenLowe

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It was the title track of "On the Tender Spot" that inspired my 'vat of chicken fat" remark.  For note bending/melding that that has a story-telling, much more than decorative  effect, try my man Chris Kase. Go to his "Teaser" on YouTube; he solos toward the end of the track. There are even more striking examples of what he can do, but for some darn reasonI can't track them down right now. Chris has been teaching in Madrid for many years.

 

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On 9/11/2020 at 9:48 AM, mjazzg said:

OK, so now I"m giving 'On the tender spot....' that further listen.

The first track is very strong indeed, the shift from improv to Latin is great. Second track sounding good too, dense, lots to absorb.

Looking forward to listening to the rest now. This is reminding me why I rated the early albums.

I enjoy Akinmusire's playing also.  I find him to be an interesting player with his own style.  His note-bending/smearing is part of his style.  I find it to be effective. 

I love traditional Hard Bop style trumpet, but there are a lot of other players that one can listen to if one has a preference for that style.

Origami Harvest was not my cup of tea, but I found much to like on his other Blue Note releases. 

Some of Akinmusire's best recorded playing in my opinion is a live recording from a performance at Smalls with the Mark Turner Band that is posted on Smalls's website from June 16 -17, 2010.  He is not credited on the website, but the band is a quartet that includes Akinmusire on trumpet. 

He is also featured on Mary Halvorson's Code Girl.

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