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adh1907

British jazz: Simon Spillett blog

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Simon has been excelling himself in the past year or so on his blog, eg his recent piece on the Southend Benny Goodman

 

https://blog.simonspillett.com/blog/the-southend-steamer.aspx

 

A lot of Tubby on the blog but Simon has also been covering some of the more obscure highways and byways of the 50s and 60s UK jazz scene. Fascinating stuff, I love it.

Anthony 

London

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Great reading, particularly as I recall seeing "the other Benny Goodman" in the 1960s.

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Thanks for the alert. Even though I read Simon's book on Tubbs, I can never get enough of  Tubbs, and his writings on Ronnie Scott, Gordon Beck, Terry Shannon, and Peter King are also quite fascinating.

I arranged Dick Morrissey's "What Did I Say About the Box, Jack?" for big band (including a note-for-note transcription of Morrissey's marvelous tenor solo-genius grace notes included), and none of the players in the NY big band that played it had ever heard of Morrissey! There's clearly a need to educate musicians about Terry Smith, Morrissey, and the musicians I mentioned above. Some of the greatest jazz in world history was drowned out by the popularity of The Beatles, Mahavishnu, Fred Zeppelin, Eric Clapton, etc...

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4 hours ago, adh1907 said:

Simon has been excelling himself in the past year or so on his blog, eg his recent piece on the Southend Benny Goodman

 

https://blog.simonspillett.com/blog/the-southend-steamer.aspx

 

A lot of Tubby on the blog but Simon has also been covering some of the more obscure highways and byways of the 50s and 60s UK jazz scene. Fascinating stuff, I love it.

Anthony 

London

fascinating read - Simon writes so well (love his Tubbs book plus his many CD liner notes)

That's right - you've gotta watch out for those "nerds"

 

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22 hours ago, sgcim said:

Thanks for the alert. Even though I read Simon's book on Tubbs, I can never get enough of  Tubbs, and his writings on Ronnie Scott, Gordon Beck, Terry Shannon, and Peter King are also quite fascinating.

I arranged Dick Morrissey's "What Did I Say About the Box, Jack?" for big band (including a note-for-note transcription of Morrissey's marvelous tenor solo-genius grace notes included), and none of the players in the NY big band that played it had ever heard of Morrissey! There's clearly a need to educate musicians about Terry Smith, Morrissey, and the musicians I mentioned above. Some of the greatest jazz in world history was drowned out by the popularity of The Beatles, Mahavishnu, Fred Zeppelin, Eric Clapton, etc...

Ashamed to say I don’t know the Morrissey track but will now hunt it down, sounds interesting.

22 hours ago, BillF said:

Great reading, particularly as I recall seeing "the other Benny Goodman" in the 1960s.

Hi Bill, where did you see the ‘other Benny Goodman’?

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17 minutes ago, adh1907 said:

Ashamed to say I don’t know the Morrissey track but will now hunt it down, sounds interesting.

Hi Bill, where did you see the ‘other Benny Goodman’?

At Ronnie Scott's. Just which gig(s) I don't recall, but I couldn't forget the name! :)

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Well I have difficulties remembering who I saw at Ronnie Scott’s in the 80s when I was a regular visitor so I understand you not recalling something from the 60s. 

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25 minutes ago, adh1907 said:

Well I have difficulties remembering who I saw at Ronnie Scott’s in the 80s when I was a regular visitor so I understand you not recalling something from the 60s. 

Agreed, though I have more vivid memories of other drummers of the era: Phil Seamen, Bobby Orr, Jackie Dougan, Bill Eyden, Ronnie Stephenson, Tony Kinsey and Alan Ganley.

I guess my vagueness of memory fits with Simon's description of Goodman as something of an "also ran."

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Posted (edited)

49 minutes ago, BillF said:

Alan Ganley.

Sat next to him once at a gig - nice guy. It was only after the gig that I realised who he was. Sat to his left was, I’m fairly sure now, pianist John Horler. At half time they went back stage at the concert to ‘see the lads’.

Not too long before that I got to sit next to Jeff Kruger of ‘The Flamingo’ fame at a Wayne Shorter gig. Again, I didn’t realise who it was until I saw him on a Beeb documentary !  He said I was lucky to get the seat (a very good one) so it must have been a ticket that he  returned last minute.

Sadly, both of these gents have now left us.

Edited by sidewinder

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10 hours ago, sidewinder said:

Sat next to him once at a gig - nice guy. It was only after the gig that I realised who he was. Sat to his left was, I’m fairly sure now, pianist John Horler. At half time they went back stage at the concert to ‘see the lads’.

Not too long before that I got to sit next to Jeff Kruger of ‘The Flamingo’ fame at a Wayne Shorter gig. Again, I didn’t realise who it was until I saw him on a Beeb documentary !  He said I was lucky to get the seat (a very good one) so it must have been a ticket that he  returned last minute.

Sadly, both of these gents have now left us.

I too sat next to a once famous drummer, Eric Delaney. (Do you remember his sensational TV antics, jumping on the timps, etc?) It was at the Wigan Jazz Festival in the noughties. Eric, now sadly passed, was by then a very cool old gent, beautifully besuited and clearly still busy - constantly consulting his phone. When a local drummer got a bit hung up on something in 3, Eric showed him the way by slapping loudly on his knees. :)

I also forgot to add Tony Crombie to my list of drummers. I well remember an afternoon session in Scott's old place in 1959 when Tony was with that great Vic Ash/Harry Klein quintet.

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P.S. Coincidence! Have only just noticed that you were playing this album, Sidewinder, which I agree is very fine indeed.:tup

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The ‘Jazz Five’ LP also has an early appearance by bassist Malcolm Cecil, who died quite recently. Plus, on a couple of tracks, an equally early appearance by drummer Tony Mann, who I remember seeing doing a gig well into the noughties. Very fine album - I think I remember reading that Tony Hall reckoned it was one of the best things ever recorded by Tempo and one with the best sonics.

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