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Hardbopjazz

How to Make Miles Davis’s Famous Chili Recipe

30 posts in this topic

 

11 hours ago, Rabshakeh said:

To be clear, I do not like oyster crackers or understand what they are for, and it has not at any point crossed my mind that pasta might be a side or that any particular pasta might be substituted for rice. 

I was not referring to you, specifically.

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1 hour ago, porcy62 said:

I was not referring to you, specifically.

Great. I wasn't sure about the "you". Sorry for the misunderstanding.

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Rabshakeh said:

Great. I wasn't sure about the "you". Sorry for the misunderstanding.

Since isn't my mother language, sometimes I use italian common saying that in english could have a different meaning .

Edited by porcy62

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Posted (edited)

10+ years ago my favorite secret chili ingredient was unsweetened cocoa powder — a couple heaping tablespoons full (sort of like Mole sauce has chocolate in it).

But since we moved to DC, I often make chili with a spicy Ethiopian Berbere spice blend (instead of traditional chili powder) — berbere is sort of the Ethiopian or Eritrean version of curry (a spice blend, which varies from region to region).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berbere

Washington DC is home to over a quarter of a million(!) Ethiopian immigrants (and their progeny) — and there are a few dozen Ethiopian restaurants in DC and certain inner-ring suburbs (esp. Silver spring MD) — and plenty of neighborhood corner markets with berbere. I’m on my 3rd or 4th small tub of the stuff since 2011 when we first moved here from KC.

Berbere spice is also great sprinkled on scrambled eggs in the morning, served atop leftover Injera — which is the spongy pancake-like bread served in every Ethiopian restaurant (with every meal), which is as sour as the strongest sourdough bread you can imagine.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Injera

TL;DR: Berbere is Ethiopian chili powder.

Edited by Rooster_Ties

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Posted (edited)

40 minutes ago, Rooster_Ties said:

10+ years ago my favorite secret chili ingredient was unsweetened cocoa powder — a couple heaping tablespoons full (sort of like Mole sauce has chocolate in it).

But since we moved to DC, I often make chili with a spicy Ethiopian Berbere spice blend (instead of traditional chili powder) — berbere is sort of the Ethiopian or Eritrean version of curry (a spice blend, which varies from region to region).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berbere

Washington DC is home to over a quarter of a million(!) Ethiopian immigrants (and their progeny) — and there are a few dozen Ethiopian restaurants in DC and certain inner-ring suburbs (esp. Silver spring MD) — and plenty of neighborhood corner markets with berbere. I’m on my 3rd or 4th small tub of the stuff since 2011 when we first moved here from KC.

Berbere spice is also great sprinkled on scrambled eggs in the morning, served atop leftover Injera — which is the spongy pancake-like bread served in every Ethiopian restaurant (with every meal), which is as sour as the strongest sourdough bread you can imagine.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Injera

TL;DR: Berbere is Ethiopian chili powder.

I've made chili with Ethiopian chili powder as well. I lived in Ethiopia for two years as a Tween. There when you hear the spice pronounced then it sounded more like Peeree Peeree.

 

I like injerra and wot but none I've ever had in the US competes with the memory of the food in Addis Ababa.

Edited by jazzbo

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