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Rabshakeh

Tony Scott

45 posts in this topic

53 minutes ago, Big Beat Steve said:

@Rabshakeh: These sessions should be easy enough to track down after all. Here is a 2CD set that combines the three LPs in their original track order (as far as I can check). So you can listen to them piecemeal LP-wise if you prefer.

https://www.freshsoundrecords.com/tony-scott-bill-evans-albums/2454-a-day-in-new-york-2-cds.html?search_query=Tony+Scott&results=76

Ok, that's ruight, they did release them in record order rahter than seeion order. It's the session order that I had to reconstruct. Usually I'm not that ambitious (excpet on a hard drive), but in this case, it was such a uniquest day of recording, I wnated to hear it that way.

No matter, the music is far above par no matter how you parse it.

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Posted (edited)

From the same era as the DAY IN NEW YORK sessions are SUNG HEROES and AT LAST. The former a rather subdued studio date with Evans, LaFaro and Motian, the latter an edgier live recording (Half Note?) with Evans again, plus Jimmy Garrison and Pete LaRoca.

Some excellent late period Scott to be heard on this recording, IMO.

61GsFRs77HL.jpg 

 

Edited by Joe

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58 minutes ago, Joe said:

Some excellent late period Scott to be heard on this recording, IMO.

image.jpg?c=jI-u2dhgc6N_IWwhq3QnCB_TZlp6

 

Same.

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Most Tony Scott recordings are not to my taste, especially when he moved off into areas quite removed from straight ahead jazz. Here are a couple of his earlier recordings that I am able to enjoy.

71ENbjH9XkL._AC_UY218_.jpg

51aixDcnzVL._AC_UY218_.jpg

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7 hours ago, Big Beat Steve said:

@Rabshakeh: These sessions should be easy enough to track down after all. Here is a 2CD set that combines the three LPs in their original track order (as far as I can check). So you can listen to them piecemeal LP-wise if you prefer.

https://www.freshsoundrecords.com/tony-scott-bill-evans-albums/2454-a-day-in-new-york-2-cds.html?search_query=Tony+Scott&results=76

 

Interesting discussion.  Amazon has offered the download of the full day session for $3.99 for awhile now, and I've been tempted:  https://www.amazon.com/York-Tony-Scott-Bill-Evans/dp/B076X5Y7T2/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Tony+Scott+a+day+in+new+york&qid=1628026587&s=dmusic&sr=1-1

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I'm not the one to recommend a Fresh Sounds product for anything, ever. But there are exceptions to every rule and this is one.

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5 hours ago, Peter Friedman said:

Most Tony Scott recordings are not to my taste, especially when he moved off into areas quite removed from straight ahead jazz. Here are a couple of his earlier recordings that I am able to enjoy.

71ENbjH9XkL._AC_UY218_.jpg

51aixDcnzVL._AC_UY218_.jpg

When I was still in my teens, I did a show with Jimmy Knepper, and I said to him, "Wow, I've got that TS album that you play on that sounds like a jam session. You sounded great on that." The album was "Free Blown Jazz".

He remembered the record and asked me if I could bring it in the next night so he could tape it. Luckily the gig was for a full week, so I gave it to him the next night, and he returned it the night after that.

Years later, we did a jazz festival gig together, and I asked him if he remembered me loaning him the album, and he said, "No".

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Posted (edited)

13 hours ago, Peter Friedman said:

Most Tony Scott recordings are not to my taste, especially when he moved off into areas quite removed from straight ahead jazz. Here are a couple of his earlier recordings that I am able to enjoy.

Agreed. Same situation here with my favorits of his earlier recordings

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41761644qn.jpg

 

 

 

41761650mg.jpg

Edited by jazzcorner
typo

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For obvious reasons I prefer the pre-Asian recordings by Tony Scott too - but that's a matter of basic approach to his music which may vary a LOT according to each indvidual's tastes in jazz. OTOH, I msut admit there are moments when I find Scott's preference for the higher register of his instrument a bit grating even on these 50s sessions.

Re- the last-mentioned recordings, I remember having read a rave review of the "Message from Garcia" LP (mostly for Garcia's guitar palying, of course) recently but cannot track it down right now to quote. I guess I'll give the LP a spin tonight (it's been a long time since last time ... ^_^).

 

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Posted (edited)

21 minutes ago, Big Beat Steve said:

OTOH, I msut admit there are moments when I find Scott's preference for the higher register of his instrument a bit grating even on these 50s sessions.

Interesting, because one of the reasons I love THEE DEFINITIVE VERSION of "Riff's Blues" from Mike Hammer is the lowerer-register playing, along with the quieter attack.

The bass clarinet in particular is an under-appreciated instrument.

 

Edited by Teasing the Korean

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1 hour ago, Teasing the Korean said:

Interesting, because one of the reasons I love THEE DEFINITIVE VERSION of "Riff's Blues" from Mike Hammer is the lowerer-register playing, along with the quieter attack.

 

So I assume that version is THY DEFINITIVE VERSION, right? :g

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2 hours ago, Big Beat Steve said:

For obvious reasons I prefer the pre-Asian recordings by Tony Scott too -

 

Not sure what you mean by "pre-Asian"?

He did those "meditation" albums and then set about living all over the world playing all types of jazz, including "normal". It's not like he Zen-ed out and live in Kyoto for the rest of his like.

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It is an approximation, nothing more. Not a definition of a specific cutoff date carved in rock. Looking at his overall discography, the basic idea should be clear, though.

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well, not necessarily...will there aloes be "post-Asian" recordings? There certainly were a lot of them!

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Ah, JSangrey splitting hairs again ... If you look at his stylistic evolution you will find that, chronologically speaking, there is a period BEFORE the "Asian" recordings (it's up to you if you consider Zen meditation, for example, being sufficiently Asian-influenced to file them under "Asia"), and his earlier output ranks stylistically "before" these "Asian" recordings so that's that. Whatever there is in "post-Asian" is beside the point because it's not what I was thinking of (neither, I would assume, by Peter Friedmann nor Jazzcorner).

(As for the 1962 Asia tour (see the recent Lost Tapes release),  I haven't heard it yet so won't comment on that.)

And at any rate this nitpicking is pointless. Tony Scott had different "periods" so it is only natural that these would appeal quite differently to people because the musical contents were deeply different.

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It's not really picking hairs - if you want to designate "pre-Asian and NOT "post-Asian", you just leave it hanging, like he did that and then did nothing dlse.

He did a lot else. There's definitely a "post-Asian" (whatever that really means?) period, I mean, my god he made a record with a trad band, and a buttload full of records just playing standards, so, yea, "post-Asian" is not splitting hairs at all.

Have you heard any of these records, or did you just go up to the end of the "pre-Asian" period and just stop?

You can think of anything you want, but if you're factually/historically wrong, you're wrong.

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3 hours ago, Teasing the Korean said:

Interesting, because one of the reasons I love THEE DEFINITIVE VERSION of "Riff's Blues" from Mike Hammer is the lowerer-register playing, along with the quieter attack.

The bass clarinet in particular is an under-appreciated instrument.

 

IIRC the Darren McGavin Mike Hammer used  Harlem Nocturne as the theme.  No idea whose version it was. 

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Posted (edited)

@Jsngry: Yes you ARE splitting hairs. I just said I prefer his recordings from his pre-Asian period. To anyone even superficially aware of what he did, hat defines them (at least roughly) in the chronology of his recorded works. Whatever he did later is BESIDE THE POINT. I did NOT dwell on these. So there is nothing to be "factually" or even historically wrong or right about. (In fact it would be historically wrong to claim that e.g. a preference for the works of an artist from period 1 that predated period 2 would by inference state ANYTHING about period 3)  And no, there is no overriding truth in how to approach diverse discographies such as his.

You are free to have the last word you so desire in (pointless) rounds like this you like to fuel ever so often but again - there is no mandatory way to justify preferences - or to justify them at all. They are just matters of taste, purely and simply.

Edited by Big Beat Steve

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So, do you like his "post-Asian" records? Have you heard them? Those Philology releases in particular are delightful!

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