HutchFan

More Favorites: Reflections on Jazz in the 1980s

388 posts in this topic

Here's a thought, to me the Flamingos' use of reverb is akin to Ben Webster's use of vibrato, does that make any sense to you?

3 hours ago, JSngry said:

And therein lies the real profundity - he's not telling us we anything didn't/shouldn't/couldn't already know. As you suggest, it was all self-evident. But "modern markets" would (and still do) think about it like the Flamingos were from another world of music, humanity even than Lester Bowie. Therefore, Lester Bowie was putting us on by covering that song. And Lester Bowie was calling bullshit on that notion. Great Black Music includes The Flamingos, especially that record.

Lester Bowie, always a man of the people and not afraid to show it, regardless of who "the people" were perceived/supposed to be. It's not a better world with him gone, let's put it that way.

 

So I guess we're more or less on the same page here, if not quite the same place on the page?

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1 hour ago, felser said:

  It is one of those rare records I will sit in the car until it finishes on the radio.

What other choice do ya' have, right? :g

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1 hour ago, danasgoodstuff said:

Here's a thought, to me the Flamingos' use of reverb is akin to Ben Webster's use of vibrato, does that make any sense to you? 

Not the vibrato itself, but the vibrato on the decay into the subtone into just the air, yeah. After a while you get used to it, but when I first heard it, yeah, total mindfuvk, like, where did the note go, that it's not there yet still there, that's some kind of mojo tricksterism or something

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My entries for last week:

- John Carter - Castles of Ghana (Gramavision, 1986)
- Cedar Walton - The Trio 1 (Red, 1986)
- Tito Puente & His Latin Ensemble - Mambo Diablo (Concord Picante, 1985)

For me, John Carter's Castles of Ghana is the highlight of his five-part "Roots and Folklore" series.  It's a masterpiece. 

 

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HutchFan,

I counted 14 really good Cedar Walton albums in the 80''s. 

It would take me a long time to try to figure out which one deserves special recognition. The one you selected is damn good, but so are many of the other 13.

 

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5 hours ago, Peter Friedman said:

HutchFan,

I counted 14 really good Cedar Walton albums in the 80''s. 

It would take me a long time to try to figure out which one deserves special recognition. The one you selected is damn good, but so are many of the other 13.

 

It's true that Cedar Walton was remarkably consistent.  So many to choose from is a good "problem" to have, no?  ;) 

 

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20 hours ago, HutchFan said:

It's true that Cedar Walton was remarkably consistent.  So many to choose from is a good "problem" to have, no?  ;) 

 

Really comes down to repertoire on any given album.

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and who were or weren't the horn players...I tend to prefer trio with Cedar once his peer horn players dropped out of the equation.

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9 hours ago, JSngry said:

and who were or weren't the horn players...I tend to prefer trio with Cedar once his peer horn players dropped out of the equation.

Same here. I like it much more with horns. Though I don´t have many, I like those with Clifford Jordan done for Steeple Chase, and that Art Farmer album with the Cedar Walton Trio doing Ellington Standards....., but I think those were from the 70´s 

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On 23.6.2022 at 2:16 AM, HutchFan said:

For me, John Carter's Castles of Ghana is the highlight of his five-part "Roots and Folklore" series.  It's a masterpiece. 

Agreed ....

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Here are my blog entries for this week:

- George Cables - Phantom of the City (Contemporary, 1985)
- Pepper Adams - The Adams Effect (Uptown, 1988, rec. 1985)
- Pierre Dørge & New Jungle Orchestra - Even the Moon Is Dancing (SteepleChase, 1985)

This week, I've written brief commentaries for each album.

 

As always, I welcome your input.  :) 

 

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On 25.6.2022 at 8:42 PM, HutchFan said:

Here are my blog entries for this week:

- George Cables - Phantom of the City (Contemporary, 1985)
- Pepper Adams - The Adams Effect (Uptown, 1988, rec. 1985)
- Pierre Dørge & New Jungle Orchestra - Even the Moon Is Dancing (SteepleChase, 1985)

This week, I've written brief commentaries for each album.

 

As always, I welcome your input.  :) 

 

I like George Cables very much and my favourite record is that with Bobby Hutcherson, Herbie Lewis and Philly J.J., "Four Seasons". And of course I saw him on several occasions.
 

Too bad I never saw Pepper Adams, he was scheduled on the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Big Band in 1978 but it seems they had changed the personnel. 1985 was quite late in his career, yes? I had seen a photo of him from Toronto 1986 and he had cancer and only few month more to live.

I don´t know who Pierre Dorge is, but that doesn´t mean nothing....

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5 hours ago, Gheorghe said:

I like George Cables very much and my favourite record is that with Bobby Hutcherson, Herbie Lewis and Philly J.J., "Four Seasons". And of course I saw him on several occasions.

Oh yes, I like Four Seasons too.  Cables and Hutcherson always made an excellent pairing.  :tup 

 

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My posts for last week on my 80s jazzblog:

- David Murray Octet - New Life (Black Saint, 1987)
- Sphere - On Tour aka Live on Tour (Red, 1986)
- Steve Coleman & Five Elements - On the Edge of Tomorrow (JMT/Winter & Winter, 1986) 

No commentary yet.  I hope to write them up later this week.

 

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Castles of Ghana is indeed a remarkable thing, and the whole series would make a nice box set.  I've explored a little of his other work and found it interesting but nothing so far as compelling as that.

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Sphere on Tour is a terrific album. I like all the Sphere recordings. The earliest ones with Charlie Rouse, or the later ones with Gary Bartz.

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This list is gold. Lots of new stuff to hear.

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I really like Bobby Watson but haven't heard Love Remains, need to fix that ASAP.

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5 hours ago, danasgoodstuff said:

I really like Bobby Watson but haven't heard Love Remains, need to fix that ASAP.

dana, I think you'd enjoy it!  :tup

 

9 hours ago, CJ Shearn said:

This list is gold. Lots of new stuff to hear.

Thanks, CJ. :)

 

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On 7/10/2022 at 3:39 PM, danasgoodstuff said:

I really like Bobby Watson but haven't heard Love Remains, need to fix that ASAP.

My very favorite Watson album.

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Posted (edited)

On 27/06/2022 at 8:11 AM, Gheorghe said:

I don´t know who Pierre Dorge is, but that doesn´t mean nothing....

The one time I saw Pierre Dorge and his Denmark-based New Jungle Orchestra was when they were on tour through Western Canada. Very impressive - although I don’t think John Tchicai was in the lineup at that stage (mid-90s).

Edited by sidewinder

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The last two week's entries on my 80s jazzblog:

- Oliver Lake - Gallery (Gramavision, 1986)
- Andrew Hill Trio & Quartet - Shades (Soul Note, 1987)
- Sonny Fortune, Billy Harper, Stanley Cowell, Reggie Workman, Billy Hart - Great Friends (Black & Blue/Evidence, 1987)

- Lee Konitz Quartet - Ideal Scene (Soul Note, 1986)
- Gust William Tsilis & Alithea with Arthur Blythe - Pale Fire (Enja, 1987)
- Dave Liebman - Homage to John Coltrane (Owl, 1987)


Dan, who is collaborating with me on this project, has also posted several entries in the last few days.

Feedback welcomed, as always.

 

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I found two in this latest batch that I like.

One by Dan - Clifford Jordan - Royal Ballads

And one by you -  Lee Konitz Quartet - Ideal Scene

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Posted (edited)

10 minutes ago, Peter Friedman said:

I found two in this latest batch that I like.

One by Dan - Clifford Jordan - Royal Ballads

And one by you -  Lee Konitz Quartet - Ideal Scene

I agree with you and Dan re: Royal Ballads.   It's a STRONG album.

I chose Two Tenor Winner (with Junior Cook) instead, but I could've just as easily gone with Royal Ballads.  Since they're both on Criss Cross, they sorta go together in my head.  

As for the Konitz album, I think that rhythm section is exceptional.  Al Harewood is a frightfully overlooked drummer, IMO.

 

Edited by HutchFan

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Andrew Hill Trio & Quartet - Shades (Soul Note, 1987)  is a really good Andrew HIll album.  The Great Friends album has such amazing personnel, it had to be good, though I always felt it could have been even better if it had been less of a cooperative venture.

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