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Nonagenarian Jazz Musicians

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I’ve got the doubletime CD and I think I’ve got them both on LP - prompt for this weekend to dig them out. Recall ‘The Eternal Triangle’ being particularly good.

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10 hours ago, clifford_thornton said:

Reece & Curson did a fine album together with pianist Claude Williamson's trio.

Reece was very fond of the Paris Reunion band. After him, Nat Adderley came in -- another contrast with Shaw, and maybe that was part of the point.

The Shaw-Hubbard albums also call to mind, at least on paper, Night of the Cookers with Lee Morgan and Freddie. Apparently both Shaw-Hubbard dates were reissued in 1995 on CD though I have not seen that version.

Thank you ! 

And becauses you mentioned the Night of the Cookers, that´s also very fine, not only the two trumpets (Lee Morgan very rare on muted trumpet on "Pensativa" and sounding a bit like Diz with muted horn......, and most of all the combination of that powerful trumpets with that strong rhythmic combination of drums and percussion....

Have to look for the Shaw-Hubbard reissue. A more modern aspect of the echoes of Fats/McGhee. 

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It is precious that Kenny Burrell and Lou Donaldson are still with us. Someone knowledgeable should interview them. Imagine the details they know. As an example, it is often said that Ike Quebec was at all Blue Note sessions until the end of 1962, but Lou said that he never saw him.

I often think of the famous players I met years ago, who have died, and I wish I could turn the clock back and ask them lots of questions. Two examples are Blue Mitchell and Bill Evans.

I met Blue in Maseru, Lesotho, in 1974. He had gone there from Jo'burg, South Africa, which he visited in a group led by Monk Montgomery. One could have asked him about the classic Horace Silver sessions, and what it was like at Rudy's studios.

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16 minutes ago, Shrdlu said:

It is precious that Kenny Burrell and Lou Donaldson are still with us. Someone knowledgeable should interview them. Imagine the details they know. As an example, it is often said that Ike Quebec was at all Blue Note sessions until the end of 1962, but Lou said that he never saw him.

 

Ted Panken conducted an interview of LD for the Smithsonian. Whether he qualifies as "knowledgeable" I will leave up to you. :g

https://tedpanken.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/for-lou-donaldsons-86th-birthday-the-complete-transcript-of-a-june-2012-conversation-for-the-smithsonian-jazz-oral-history-project/

 

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I always regret not interviewing Hank Jones.

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10 hours ago, Dan Gould said:

Ted Panken conducted an interview of LD for the Smithsonian. Whether he qualifies as "knowledgeable" I will leave up to you. :g

https://tedpanken.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/for-lou-donaldsons-86th-birthday-the-complete-transcript-of-a-june-2012-conversation-for-the-smithsonian-jazz-oral-history-project/

 

That is a one great interview. Panken prods and Lou tells it as he saw it - great insight into the scene.

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14 hours ago, Shrdlu said:

Two examples are Blue Mitchell and Bill Evans.

I met Blue in Maseru, Lesotho, in 1974. He had gone there from Jo'burg, South Africa, which he visited in a group led by Monk Montgomery. One could have asked him about the classic Horace Silver sessions, and what it was like at Rudy's studios.

I think I remember Blue Mitchell in his last year played with "Supersax" which sold quite well in the late 70´s, and Blue Mitchell played the trumpet part and solos, I think after that he died of cancer.

I had the luck to meet another great trumpet player from that period : Bill Hardman ! He was friendly to me and I could sit down with him and ask him a few questions: I remember the first thing I said was that the first time I heard his great trumpet was when I was at highschool and a Blakey fan and bought "Art Blakey and the Jazzmessengers play Lerner&Lowe" from RCA (the Black&White series), and Bill Hardman was glad to hear that and said "long long time ago, but you are right, I remember that session"...., and he played his set "Walkin", "Funny Valentine" "Tunisia" . That was during the old "system" in the 80´s when we played at a festival in Cehoslovacia and Hardman was the last artist, the only US-Star who played at that time in that Eastern Europe country. 
Ah yeah, and I told him I also saw him live with Junior Cook a few years earlier.....

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Recall when I saw Louis Bellson’s Big Band the first time that Blue had been in the recent lineup and most recent recording (on Pablo I think) but had sadly passed on after ilness not long before the tour. The band did a tribute number in his memory called ‘Blue’ featuring Bobby Shew.

Edited by sidewinder

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14 hours ago, Quasimado said:

That is a one great interview. Panken prods and Lou tells it as he saw it - great insight into the scene.

Yes. One of the most rewarding and comprehensive reflections I have encountered. Was a privilege to read. There is another similar comprehensive interview I have read with George Benson that shares a similar candid sense of depth, insight and warmth. I think it was an NEA Jazz Masters interview. 

On 14/2/2022 at 3:51 AM, Shrdlu said:

It is precious that Kenny Burrell and Lou Donaldson are still with us. Someone knowledgeable should interview them. Imagine the details they know. As an example, it is often said that Ike Quebec was at all Blue Note sessions until the end of 1962, but Lou said that he never saw him.

I often think of the famous players I met years ago, who have died, and I wish I could turn the clock back and ask them lots of questions. Two examples are Blue Mitchell and Bill Evans.

I met Blue in Maseru, Lesotho, in 1974. He had gone there from Jo'burg, South Africa, which he visited in a group led by Monk Montgomery. One could have asked him about the classic Horace Silver sessions, and what it was like at Rudy's studios.

There is this interview with Kenny Burrell which has some nice insights and memories. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XE04GGmjd8

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Almost a nonagenarian: Charlie Gabriel releases new recording, 89.

https://www.nola.com/gambit/music/article_4b4ac17c-8d15-11ec-9dfb-d7e953d02638.html

Charlie Gabriel is listening to his recording of “I’m Confessin’” playing from Ben Jaffe’s phone speaker, when it sparks a story.

“That reminds me of when I first met Louis Armstrong,” Gabriel says. “I was about 13 or 14 years old and I met him here in New Orleans at The Coliseum — there used to be a boxing ring on Conti. The building is still there, but it used to be a boxing arena. So my dad took me up there to meet Louis, and Louis is rubbing my head, you know, ‘I’m gonna take this boy on the road, man.’ I believed him — he was just joking at my dad. And this was one of the [songs] Louis used to do, ‘I’m Confessin’,” and I guess that stayed with me as a youngster.”

“I’m Confessin’” appears on Gabriel’s new album, “89,” alongside other standards, like “Stardust” and “Three Little Words,” and two originals, “The Darker It Gets” and “Yellow Moon.” Sub Pop will release the album digitally and on streaming platforms on Friday, Feb. 25, with vinyl records and CDs available July 1.

...

Gabriel was born in 1932 in New Orleans, growing up in a house on Conti Street near North Galvez. He would become the fourth generation of New Orleans musicians in his family — a lineage that goes back to the 1850s and his great-grandfather, bass player Narcesse Gabriel. During World War II, Charlie Gabriel would sit in for his father, the clarinetist and drummer Martin Manuel Gabriel.

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Ernest Ranglin turned 90 today.  

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1 hour ago, Dan Gould said:

This isn't like when does the millennium begin if there was no "year zero".  Anyone 90 to 99 is a nonagenarian.

Numbers don't have biases with regard to how they are applied.

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1 hour ago, Teasing the Korean said:

Numbers don't have biases with regard to how they are applied.

I have no idea what you are trying to say, but Schifrin is a nonagenarian.

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Yeah, I took communion with him in church this past Sunday, so there's all the proof you should need about that. 

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21 minutes ago, Dan Gould said:

I have no idea what you are trying to say, but Schifrin is a nonagenarian.

Not by my calculations.  Maybe you use different numbers than I.

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Just now, Teasing the Korean said:

Not by my calculations.  Maybe you use different numbers than I.

Whatever. I linked you to a google search. No dictionary defines nonagenarian as starting at 91.

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nonagenarian: of the age of 90 years, or between 90 and 100 years old.

TTK, you're wrong, plain and simple. And of course, your Alain Delon thread is in the wrong forum. Deal with, or wait for Jim to save your a$$ with an off-handed comment.

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Posted (edited)

8 minutes ago, Dan Gould said:

Whatever. I linked you to a google search. No dictionary defines nonagenarian as starting at 91.

I encourage you to use numbers in a way that suits you.  :tup

31 minutes ago, Dan Gould said:

I have no idea what you are trying to say...

Yes, I recognize this. :tup

I still would like to have drinks with you next time you are in town.  My treat.

Edited by Teasing the Korean

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1 hour ago, sonnymax said:

 nonagenarian: of the age of 90 years, or between 90 and 100 years old.

And of course, your Alain Delon thread is in the wrong forum. Deal with, or wait for Jim to save your a$$ with an off-handed comment.

You mean like saying that I think he's a coward for not having the guts to do it himself?

That's not at all off-handed, that's based on very raw, real experience, but I didn't want to get involved at that level on that thread.

On a more serious note, though, my math training (20th century, granted) was that "between" needed to be qualified as either "inclusive" or "exclusive".

"Between 90 and 100" inclusive would mean that a 100 yr old would still be a nonagenarian. Wrong. 

"Between 90 and 100" exclusive would mean that a 90 year old would mean that a 99 year old was not yet a nonagenarian, which would then have you contradicting yourself.

I'm afraid that if you are not confused, your statement projects otherwise. I know how much you value correctness and precision, so please take this in the spirit with which it is being offered. 

How many people are in a nonet? It's a simple matter of etymology 

Besides, when a person has their first birthday, they are quite literally 1 year old. The have completed 1 year of life.

I never got the whole "there was no year zero" thing, that seems like confusion masquerading as cleverness. Time is not a number. 

So anyway... when somebody turns 90, the have completed 90 years of life.

9_ years = nonagenarian

Origin-Latin "nonagenta"= ninety
 
this isn't even a difference of opinion, there are no alternate facts here (or anywhere else for that matter)

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