Dub Modal

BFT #219

61 posts in this topic

I'm still planning to do this one! Haven't peeked at any of the guesses but I noticed a reveal and then saw your post above. So I have 2 hints at least. :) Going to try to get to this in the next couple days while avoiding spoilers...

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No worries man, hope you enjoy it and any thoughts appreciated  :tup

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Yeah, same here. WAAAAY too long responding, but life is what happens, etc.

TRACK ONE - Clifford & Kenny. Unmistakable sounds each. And Wilbur also, right? Equally unmistakable. Not just sounds, voices. Not just voices, sounds. Serious at any age, at any time.

TRACK TWO - Harp recorded this well in this style almost has to be Brandee(sp?) Younger. I have her record and it's getting a little bit of airplay on the local college jazz station (which usually doesn't skew this way at all). That tune sounds familiar, is it? I hope she has enough in the tank to go past this, becuase although this is refreshing, it's not exactly new, if you know what I mean. But it's a great place to start, if not to finish. We shall see! OTOH, if the young people like it, good. Let them have their music.

TRACK THREE - I like the pianist, but the bassist pulls it more into a Bill Evans zone/area than I really like.  I recall from reading along as the responses went up (sorry, but after a while, I gotta look in) that this is Paul Bley & Gary Peacock...not sure when this was recorded, but I know their work together to be not at all in this bag, and I prefer them in that freer bag. But oh well!

TRACK FOUR - "In A Sentimental Mood", no idea by who(m?), but this is nice, I like the right hand going one way and the left hand neither following or jumping on board, just continuing to anchor. That's very mature playing, imo.

TRACK FIVE - Yeah! If you go far enough back, seriously enough, there is no way to avoid this cut, nor this band either, to one degree or another. What a blend, what colors, Ellington was famous for that, but listen to this, this is every bit of all of that. "Organ Grinder Swing", there's words to it too, I have an Ella version of it and the words are cool and all that, but this..THIS!!!

TRACK SIX - I'd go with Harold Vick, and hard, if I didn't know that it had already been I'd as Nathan Davis. I don't feel bad about being worng that way either, becuase they both deserve fullest props. And it's a GREAT tune too.

TRACK SEVEN - Takes a while to get going, will it be worth it? Guitarist has a little "Rainy Night In Georgia", for some reason? Piano is pleasantly generic in a post-70s kind of way, and now there is a synth, which neither adds nor detracts, imo, possibly adds in that it's in tempo, so "trance" effect is not disturbed. So is it all going to come together and work? DAMN, IT'S OVER. we'll never know!!!

TRACK EIGHT - I already know it's Garbarek, but not if it's still early. I think it is, because it's still got that Ayler-awareness going on. I like this a good deal, and I liked Garbarek until at some point it seemed like he got all MOR-ish in his own way, not in sound, but in energy. But even as he went hardcore "icy", I still dug him, because of that SOUND. But this is pretty early, right? Not SUPER early, like with George Russell, but like pre 1974-ish or something? I know it's up there, the answers, but I'm really trying to look as little as possible. But this one, yeah, that's there.

TRACK NINE - "Flamingo" in a kind of  Jamal bag, but I don't think it's Jamal, Jamal is a LOT more fragmented and spacious than that. This is kinda hardcore linear, like, homage/plow/homage/plow...I'm laughing, I'm crying, if it were earlier in the month I'd order a jumbo popcorn to see the mystery revealed. But that almost has to be Jamal (I'll laugh) or somebody doing an outright cop (I'll cry) or one cut on an album of nothing else like this as an album cut just as a "novelty" cut (I'll be glad I got the extra popcorn!). But all props due to Ahmad Jamal.

TRACK TEN - oh dear, that has a 70s or Gary Burton thing going on, of which I am not at all particularly fond. I've been revisiting the RCA & Atlantic Burton Quartet to see what I might have missed the first time around, and so far the answer is maybe a little, but not THAT much, earlier impressions illuminated but not changed - a groovy group except for the leader!. But I went there from totally getting into Carla Bley, and with Carla Bley, all roads lead to Steve Swallow (quite by design, as I understand it, he was her first, and remains, her staunchest advocate, and for that he's done God's Work in his lifetime), and I have come to REALLY dig the ongoing evolution of Steve Swallow as bassist, but I don't think this is him.There is way too much preening vanity in this playing. Steve Swallow would evolve a masterful ability on his instrument that is not without pride, but is totally without vanity. I have a hunch that finally getting together with Carla as a life partner got him there. So I really hope this isn't Steve Swallow. In fact, I hope this isn't anybody, to be honest. Sorry.

TRACK ELEVEN - Sounds like one of those 70s guys who were into Pharoah and who had some of the chops, maybe a lot of them, but not all of them. I'm wanting to say Carlos Garnett? But Garnett had a fatter sound than that...this is derivative, but it seems from the heart, Close enough for this purpose.

TRACK TWELVE - All rise for the National Anthem! Well, no, it's not that. It's a pop song that I can't remember (not that I want to...). Kind of Ibrahim-ish, but only kind of. On the whole, I like it well enough. And it is a good closer.

Thanks for doing this. It's a really quality collection, and I apologize for being so late to the game. No reason other than shit kept happening, some of it planned, some not, none of it bad, but all of it took time, right?

Still, worth the wait on this end.

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15 hours ago, JSngry said:

Yeah, same here. WAAAAY too long responding, but life is what happens, etc.

TRACK ONE - Clifford & Kenny. Unmistakable sounds each. And Wilbur also, right? Equally unmistakable. Not just sounds, voices. Not just voices, sounds. Serious at any age, at any time. Yes to all three. I knew this track wouldn't be difficult to guess but included it because I like the album and this track. 

TRACK TWO - Harp recorded this well in this style almost has to be Brandee(sp?) Younger. I have her record and it's getting a little bit of airplay on the local college jazz station (which usually doesn't skew this way at all). That tune sounds familiar, is it? I hope she has enough in the tank to go past this, becuase although this is refreshing, it's not exactly new, if you know what I mean. But it's a great place to start, if not to finish. We shall see! OTOH, if the young people like it, good. Let them have their music. Spot on with Brandee Younger. She & Dezron recorded this during the pandemic quarantine remote from each other, and to me this was a standout track from that album. I've listened to her Impulse label release and it's more varied for sure. 

TRACK THREE - I like the pianist, but the bassist pulls it more into a Bill Evans zone/area than I really like.  I recall from reading along as the responses went up (sorry, but after a while, I gotta look in) that this is Paul Bley & Gary Peacock...not sure when this was recorded, but I know their work together to be not at all in this bag, and I prefer them in that freer bag. But oh well! Yeah, this is "inside" Bley but as an overall composition, I really like it. The melody stays with me after listening. 

TRACK FOUR - "In A Sentimental Mood", no idea by who(m?), but this is nice, I like the right hand going one way and the left hand neither following or jumping on board, just continuing to anchor. That's very mature playing, imo. Billy Taylor. A heavyweight IMO and surprisingly under-represented across this BFT universe. 

TRACK FIVE - Yeah! If you go far enough back, seriously enough, there is no way to avoid this cut, nor this band either, to one degree or another. What a blend, what colors, Ellington was famous for that, but listen to this, this is every bit of all of that. "Organ Grinder Swing", there's words to it too, I have an Ella version of it and the words are cool and all that, but this..THIS!!! Glad you enjoy this as much as I do. We may be outliers for that in this listening room. 

TRACK SIX - I'd go with Harold Vick, and hard, if I didn't know that it had already been I'd as Nathan Davis. I don't feel bad about being worng that way either, becuase they both deserve fullest props. And it's a GREAT tune too. Another melody that sticks with the listener. Glad this album was reissued. 

TRACK SEVEN - Takes a while to get going, will it be worth it? Guitarist has a little "Rainy Night In Georgia", for some reason? Piano is pleasantly generic in a post-70s kind of way, and now there is a synth, which neither adds nor detracts, imo, possibly adds in that it's in tempo, so "trance" effect is not disturbed. So is it all going to come together and work? DAMN, IT'S OVER. we'll never know!!! You got Prysock on the brain! And that's not a bad thing...Anyway, not a real popular tune in this set but I still dig it. The synth player is Nala Sinephro and it's her first album. I'm looking forward to more from her in the future as I think she's got some interesting ideas. 

TRACK EIGHT - I already know it's Garbarek, but not if it's still early. I think it is, because it's still got that Ayler-awareness going on. I like this a good deal, and I liked Garbarek until at some point it seemed like he got all MOR-ish in his own way, not in sound, but in energy. But even as he went hardcore "icy", I still dug him, because of that SOUND. But this is pretty early, right? Not SUPER early, like with George Russell, but like pre 1974-ish or something? I know it's up there, the answers, but I'm really trying to look as little as possible. But this one, yeah, that's there. Yep, from 1972. I dig all 3 of these guys, Garbarek, Andersen and especially Vesala who - for me at least - never disappoints. 

TRACK NINE - "Flamingo" in a kind of  Jamal bag, but I don't think it's Jamal, Jamal is a LOT more fragmented and spacious than that. This is kinda hardcore linear, like, homage/plow/homage/plow...I'm laughing, I'm crying, if it were earlier in the month I'd order a jumbo popcorn to see the mystery revealed. But that almost has to be Jamal (I'll laugh) or somebody doing an outright cop (I'll cry) or one cut on an album of nothing else like this as an album cut just as a "novelty" cut (I'll be glad I got the extra popcorn!). But all props due to Ahmad Jamal. It's Hal Galper and the album is Tippin'. The liners talk about how Jamal was an innovator of this style - "playing time that was developed in the 50s, characterized by a light and dancing beat." None of the tracks on this album are originals. This one is from Anderson & Grouya, but I'm wondering if "Tippin'" could also refer to a tippin' of the cap to the original artists/composers of these tracks. Interestingly enough, Jamal was not covered at all. 

TRACK TEN - oh dear, that has a 70s or Gary Burton thing going on, of which I am not at all particularly fond. I've been revisiting the RCA & Atlantic Burton Quartet to see what I might have missed the first time around, and so far the answer is maybe a little, but not THAT much, earlier impressions illuminated but not changed - a groovy group except for the leader!. But I went there from totally getting into Carla Bley, and with Carla Bley, all roads lead to Steve Swallow (quite by design, as I understand it, he was her first, and remains, her staunchest advocate, and for that he's done God's Work in his lifetime), and I have come to REALLY dig the ongoing evolution of Steve Swallow as bassist, but I don't think this is him.There is way too much preening vanity in this playing. Steve Swallow would evolve a masterful ability on his instrument that is not without pride, but is totally without vanity. I have a hunch that finally getting together with Carla as a life partner got him there. So I really hope this isn't Steve Swallow. In fact, I hope this isn't anybody, to be honest. Sorry. It's Swallow! But also Eberhard Weber as there's 2 bassists here. 

TRACK ELEVEN - Sounds like one of those 70s guys who were into Pharoah and who had some of the chops, maybe a lot of them, but not all of them. I'm wanting to say Carlos Garnett? But Garnett had a fatter sound than that...this is derivative, but it seems from the heart, Close enough for this purpose. Idris Ackamoor, AKA Bruce Baker from Chicago. There are some derivative aspects here, but honestly, almost all new music is derivative in some form but what you say regarding from the heart is really important as a differentiator. I think these guys have it. Ackamoor is interesting as a current artist in that he has almost no representation across social media platforms. He doesn't promote himself and so leaves it to the label. That label here is Strut, which does a decent enough job. To me this song and album are strong enough to be recognized across the spectrum. Hoping I can catch Idris & the Pyramids (or whatever his band may be) live sometime soon. 

TRACK TWELVE - All rise for the National Anthem! Well, no, it's not that. It's a pop song that I can't remember (not that I want to...). Kind of Ibrahim-ish, but only kind of. On the whole, I like it well enough. And it is a good closer. This pianist was totally new to me, but a lot of the artists William Parker records are, especially across that expansive 10 CD set. This is a part of that whole vision, and it works within that and apart from it. 

Thanks for doing this. It's a really quality collection, and I apologize for being so late to the game. No reason other than shit kept happening, some of it planned, some not, none of it bad, but all of it took time, right? 

Still, worth the wait on this end. Thank you and glad you enjoyed most of it. :tup

 

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Finally finished this one up! Here are my notes as I was listening...

Track 1 - Aha! I know this one... was just listening to this LP not too long ago actually. The mighty Clifford Jordan from "Starting Time." I think this is the lead off track? This is a killer tune. Jordan's solo on this is epic, and Wilbur Ware & Tootie are laying it down with conviction. Damn I love this. Off to a great start!

Track 2 - Oh wow... that's a harp, yes? And some seriously great sounding upright bass. The pocket is deep here. I suppose there are only so many jazz harp players so I should be able to guess this, but I'm sorry to say I'm not really familiar with *any* jazz harpists. Maybe Dorothy Ashby? But that's a pure wild guess. Whoever this is, I'm really digging it. Soulful, groovy stuff, nice tune. Again I really love the bass player's sound and feel. And is there actually a drummer who's sitting out on this? I feel like I heard a couple of cymbal hits in there.

Track 3 - Three for three... loving this one as well. Beautiful sounding trio. I like how the bassist is filling in a lot of the space with runs while the pianist and drummer lay down that open, groovy but spacey kind of feel. This is some great stuff. My only complaint is that I wish it could be longer! Some fabulous communication between the 3 musicians here.

Track 4 - I'm really digging this neighborhood we're in. This is "In a Sentimental Mood" of course, and I am. Beautiful piano work. I love that this isn't overly flashy... it's an interpretation that really lets the beauty of this tune shine through and it's deeply felt. Another winner!

Track 5 - I like this, but after the last four tunes it feels like a pretty abrupt change. A bit more outside of my wheelhouse, but I enjoy it. Just haven't dug into this era of the music as much.

Track 6 - Boy this sounds familiar. It's bugging me that I can't think of the name of the tune. Love the nice easy feel. Some very tasty drumming. And I've rarely heard a soprano sax sound that beautiful, wow! Really nice. Anxious to find out who this is.

Track 7 - That hint of wah tells me we're in the 70s possibly? No, this sounds more modern actually. Love the space they're setting up here. Hooo man! This is deep. Digging the piano solo. And I love the synth interlude too. 

Track 8 - There are clear nods to Ayler and Ornette here... for a moment I was thinking David Murray or Jemeel Moondoc but it's not either of them. But stylistically they're close to early David Murray trio. This might be a European group though? I'm impressed with the facility of the bassist.

Track 9 - Ahhh... what is this tune? Another one that's on the tip of my brain. I like the way they're doing this, the Ahmad Jamal kind of vibe. I both love what the drummer is doing, and am a bit tired of it after a while... might be nice to change it up at some point. But overall this is a really nice rendition.

Track 10 - Well this has got to be Gary Burton and Steve Swallow. Ah, and Pat Metheny! I actually haven't listened a lot to this group but it's clearly them. This is really good. A nice reminder that I need to dig into this stuff a bit more. I do love the beautiful floaty feeling of this. It's funny, I love the vibes as an instrument but don't know a lot of Burton... I tend more towards Hutcherson, Dickerson, Jamal... but this is great.

Track 11 - I like this vamp a lot. And I dig this saxophonist! Strong Chicago vibe happening here. Oh hell yes... now we're rockin! Who *is* this tenor player? This thing is just simmering like mad and I love it. No guesses on the players but this is right in my neighborhood. I need this!

Track 12 - This is nice, but it doesn't do a ton for me if I'm honest. I loved so much of this BFT... this one just doesn't hold up to the rest of the tunes for me personally.

Overall, holy cow... great selection of music here. There's so much I loved that I both look forward to and fear the reveal as it will probably put a dent in my wallet!

Thanks so much for putting this together!

 

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On 6/25/2022 at 4:42 PM, webbcity said:

Finally finished this one up! Here are my notes as I was listening...

Track 1 - Aha! I know this one... was just listening to this LP not too long ago actually. The mighty Clifford Jordan from "Starting Time." I think this is the lead off track? This is a killer tune. Jordan's solo on this is epic, and Wilbur Ware & Tootie are laying it down with conviction. Damn I love this. Off to a great start! Yep, glad you like this one! It's actually hard not to like IMO. 

Track 2 - Oh wow... that's a harp, yes? And some seriously great sounding upright bass. The pocket is deep here. I suppose there are only so many jazz harp players so I should be able to guess this, but I'm sorry to say I'm not really familiar with *any* jazz harpists. Maybe Dorothy Ashby? But that's a pure wild guess. Whoever this is, I'm really digging it. Soulful, groovy stuff, nice tune. Again I really love the bass player's sound and feel. And is there actually a drummer who's sitting out on this? I feel like I heard a couple of cymbal hits in there. No drummer, but since Dezron & Brandee were playing over a click track, I'm wondering if a remnant or two got caught in the audio. I definitely rec this album for anyone wanting to check out Brandee Younger. 

Track 3 - Three for three... loving this one as well. Beautiful sounding trio. I like how the bassist is filling in a lot of the space with runs while the pianist and drummer lay down that open, groovy but spacey kind of feel. This is some great stuff. My only complaint is that I wish it could be longer! Some fabulous communication between the 3 musicians here. Billy Elgert on drums with Peacock & Bley filling out the trio. They make it work. 

Track 4 - I'm really digging this neighborhood we're in. This is "In a Sentimental Mood" of course, and I am. Beautiful piano work. I love that this isn't overly flashy... it's an interpretation that really lets the beauty of this tune shine through and it's deeply felt. Another winner! Billy Taylor with an excellent version of this tune. 

Track 5 - I like this, but after the last four tunes it feels like a pretty abrupt change. A bit more outside of my wheelhouse, but I enjoy it. Just haven't dug into this era of the music as much. Recording style dates it for sure, but the attitude shines through. 

Track 6 - Boy this sounds familiar. It's bugging me that I can't think of the name of the tune. Love the nice easy feel. Some very tasty drumming. And I've rarely heard a soprano sax sound that beautiful, wow! Really nice. Anxious to find out who this is. I highly recommend Nathan Davis albums to anyone. This Peace Treaty reissue is fantastic. 

Track 7 - That hint of wah tells me we're in the 70s possibly? No, this sounds more modern actually. Love the space they're setting up here. Hooo man! This is deep. Digging the piano solo. And I love the synth interlude too.  New music with a lot of space. That's one of the reasons I picked this one. Glad you liked it. 

Track 8 - There are clear nods to Ayler and Ornette here... for a moment I was thinking David Murray or Jemeel Moondoc but it's not either of them. But stylistically they're close to early David Murray trio. This might be a European group though? I'm impressed with the facility of the bassist. Arild Andersen on bass. Phenomenal player. 

Track 9 - Ahhh... what is this tune? Another one that's on the tip of my brain. I like the way they're doing this, the Ahmad Jamal kind of vibe. I both love what the drummer is doing, and am a bit tired of it after a while... might be nice to change it up at some point. But overall this is a really nice rendition. Flamingo from Hal Galper, Wayne Dockery on bass and Steve Ellington on drums. 

Track 10 - Well this has got to be Gary Burton and Steve Swallow. Ah, and Pat Metheny! I actually haven't listened a lot to this group but it's clearly them. This is really good. A nice reminder that I need to dig into this stuff a bit more. I do love the beautiful floaty feeling of this. It's funny, I love the vibes as an instrument but don't know a lot of Burton... I tend more towards Hutcherson, Dickerson, Jamal... but this is great. Nailed the artists. Glad you like this one too. 

Track 11 - I like this vamp a lot. And I dig this saxophonist! Strong Chicago vibe happening here. Oh hell yes... now we're rockin! Who *is* this tenor player? This thing is just simmering like mad and I love it. No guesses on the players but this is right in my neighborhood. I need this! Idris Ackamoor, and impressed you picked up on the Chicago vibe. 

Track 12 - This is nice, but it doesn't do a ton for me if I'm honest. I loved so much of this BFT... this one just doesn't hold up to the rest of the tunes for me personally. It's definitely different but that's part of why I included it. Not for everyone, but I like the hymnal/spiritual quality. 

Overall, holy cow... great selection of music here. There's so much I loved that I both look forward to and fear the reveal as it will probably put a dent in my wallet!

Thanks so much for putting this together!

Glad you enjoyed it and thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts! 

 

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He's alive and well, living here in Dallas. Busy guy.

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34 minutes ago, Dub Modal said:

Good, glad to hear he’s ok!

Excellent. I remember Rod from the (long defunct) rec.music.classical.contemporary newsgroup more than 25 years ago!

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15 hours ago, T.D. said:

Excellent. I remember Rod from the (long defunct) rec.music.classical.contemporary newsgroup more than 25 years ago!

Oooooo!  Usenet!  I wasted a LOT of time in that neck of the woods back then (not that group, but others).  Miss those days.  Seems like the text interface made for better conversation.  :/

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