Brandon Burke

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Everything posted by Brandon Burke

  1. David Axelrod

    those are two of my favorite LPs in the world...but i'm not sure they're what DA is most "known for". rather, i'd say it's his funk dates on Capitol featuring Adderley (and Co.). there's a good interview/article on him in the last Wax Poetics. i'd recommend getting it. it's a good publication and those things go OOP pretty quickly. (issue #1 regularly goes for $100 on ebay...and it's only a couple years old!!)
  2. Happy Birthday, Brandon Burke!

    Fellas, very kind...thanks a bunch. will try to participate more in the future, schedule forbids it now. be on the lookout for a cool project coming out in in january featuring artwork and words from (what has to be) one of your favorite board members. details on that to follow as well... cheers, Brandon P.S. Clifford, funny you say that. it's the same as Emily's dad too.
  3. Monterey Jazz Festival

    FYI: The Archive of Recorded Sound at Stanford University has begun digitization of the Monterey Jazz Festival Collection and I was involved in quality control for the first batch we got back from the vendor. It is perhaps common knowledge by now that Fantasy Studios in Berkeley is doing the work. Kind of a no-brainer since they're local and already familiar with this kind of material. The recordings -- what we got back so far, anyway -- sound great. Almost too great for archival perservation masters. I'm wondering if they sneaked some noise reduction in there because there's absolutely no tape hiss whatsoever. This is all fine and good, of course, since this material will eventually see commercial release. Problem is, only *raw* transfers qualify as archival preservation masters so there's a chance we'll have to go back and make sure they're not "cleaning them up" as they go. (That can always be done later from said *raw transfer* file.) No time to get into detail about what sessions were heard. It's late. Just a general heads-up. More later as things develop... best, Brandon
  4. The Martini

    Maker's Mark in a cheap imitation Jack. Manhattans are good on pancakes. ← Upon further review: Jack Daniels is great if you're into the "cool because the American popular culture canon has deemed it to be a tough guy drink" thing. Other than that, it sucks. (See also cheap black coffee.)
  5. The Martini

    Maker's Mark in a cheap imitation Jack. Manhattans are good on pancakes. ← There must not be any folks from the Bluegrass State on here because, in Kentucky, them's fightin' words. I remember going into a liquor store in Louisville (sometime around the 1997 Derby) and noticing that they, quite deliberately, left weeks and weeks of dust only on the Jack Daniels section. Hilarious...
  6. Ken Vandermark

    I can honestly say that i never expected to see a jazz record dedicated to The Volcano Suns. That sounds like something I would do... BTW: Cliff, you were almost right..!
  7. What vinyl are you spinning right now??

    Earlier today... * Tran Quang Hai & Hoang Mong Thuy - Music of Vietnam (Lyrichord) * Zelia Barbosa - Brazil: Songs of Protest (Monitor) * Rashied Ali - New Directions in Modern Music (Survival) * Philly Joe Jones - Showcase (Riverside) * Thelonious Monk - Plus Two at the Blackhawk (Riverside)
  8. The Martini

    My favorite cocktail is a Maker's Mark manhattan. My martini of choice, however, is Ketel One with only a "wash" of vermouth and one big fat olive.
  9. Yusef Lateef - PSYCHICEMOTUS

    I passed on a clean LP copy of this today. Maybe I'll go back and check it out tomorrow...
  10. Modern Rock - what do you like???

    The Animal Collective record that comes out next month is going to cause some waves. You heard it here first...
  11. Ken Vandermark recs

    I would recommend anything he's on that also features drummer Paal Nilssen-Love, as I find the latter to be one of the most exciting players around. This includes, among other things: * School Days - In Our Times (Okka) * School Days - Crossing Division (Okka) * Atomic / School Days - Nuclear Assembly Hall (Okka) Contact Chuck if you're interested...
  12. Kanye West

    A particularly alarming byproduct of modernity (read: capitalism) is the fact that we, as a society, respect otherwise dubious personalities on the basis that they have demonstrated an ability to manage funds and/or marketing trends. What the f*ck, man...
  13. 1 album - 1 artist

    The only Pavement album anyone needs:
  14. Now reading...

    Only a couple pages left of Herzog on Herzog. Been really enjoying this series of late. Last one I read was Trier on Von Trier and next will likely be Cassavetes on Cassavetes. That is, once I plow through all the Herzog films I've been reading about...
  15. Cymande!

    of course Cymande is good. if you wouldn't have blown off that Chains & Black Exhaust comp i sent you, i'm sure you'd be talking about that too. what am i, chopped liver..?
  16. Harold Land

    Then maybe you can answer a question for me. I was listening to the OJC CD of "You Get More Bounce With Curtis Counce" on headphones the other day, and noticed on track 3 ("Too Close for Comfort") that the left channel disappears at 1:28-1:51. Do I have a defective CD, or do you hear it also? ← I balked on a nice LP copy of another Counce on Contemporary. Can't remembere the name right now but it too features Land and Butler. For those in the Bay Area, it's probably still in the new arrivals at the SF Amoeba. I'm leaving town tomorrow so I can't get it either way...
  17. Kanye West

    Fair opinions, both, but remember that lyrics in hop hop culture are as important as cadence is to poetry. Paying credence to one in favor of the other not only means you're missing out on half the content, you're also ignoring a crucial aspect of either culture. Rap MCs reverent to the culture understand that their role is equal parts post-scat singer and poet. I agree about 50 Cent but...guess what? He's a #1 selling pop star. That's kinda the way it works, man. I understand if your appreciation of rap culture is such that you only get glimpses here and there on television. That's how I absorb what little I know about new country music. Does this mean that all new country music is terrible? Certainly not. I'm not saying I particularly like it, but there's good stuff out there. Similarly, how informed would you find my opinion if I judged jazz music by what I saw on BET Jazz? Same thing. Back to the point though...50 Cent is for the birds. Eminem too. That stuff's awful... Allow me to present an example of some lyrics I find particularly good, both for their percussive qualities and the lyrical content. I tried to space them out into seperate lines so as to imply the cadences, assuming you don't know the song, which is "Triumph" by the Wu-Tang Clan (1997). The MC on this verse is Inspectah Deck. I bomb atomically. Socrates' philosophies and hypotheses can't define how I be droppin' these mockeries. Lyrically perform armed robbery. Flee with the lottery, possibly they spotted me. Battle-scarred shogun, explosion when my pen hits, tremendous. Ultra-violet shine blinds forensics. Fellow Wu-Tang member, GZA, who appears on this song later and is commonly understood to be the *deepest* of all Wu-Tang MCs, had this to say of Inspectah Deck's verse: "After I heard that I didn't even want to get on that song." Admittedly, that's some pretty obtuse stuff--but nowhere near as confusing as just about any song featuring Ghostface Killah, also from the Wu-Tang Clan. I've been typing this post for entirely too long to look another example up, but suffice it to say, Ghostface's lyrics are typically free association phrases that form neither cohesive sentences nor even phrases. Instead he combines images--often several nouns in a row without any "action"--in a way that takes the shape of both a mosaic of urban life and a scatter-shot, descostructionist, verbal, Jackson Pollock. (To say nothing, of course, for his particular use of vowel an consonant sounds.) In any case, I can't leave without giving you this particularly hilarious quote. This is Ghostface speaking about how no one understands his lyrics: "I don't give a f*ck if you don't know what I'm talking about--this is art. When you go see a painting on the wall and it looks all bugged out because he ain't got no benches, no trees there, it's just a splash. The nigga that did it know what the f*ck it is." I wrote a paper years ago about how metaphor fucntions in rap music. One of these days I'll dig it up and paste whatever seems appropriate to this conversation. Some of it is woefully out of date, but other parts are pretty good, I think. Anyway...
  18. Your current desktop theme

    an amazing photograph from a Shepp/Moncur/Burrell/Silva/Delcloo BYG session.
  19. Rock Vinyl Reissues From 1990's LPs

    agreed. those early Ride sides are the same way. one needs to keep in mind that the overall sound quality of a disc depends on not only the pressing (thickness of the vinyl, quality of the vinyl, etc) but also the way it was mixed before heading to the factory. some of those Creation sessions were pretty condensed, and you'll get that regardless of what format you buy. brings up the same old question: why shell out $20 for a 150gm LP when it's source is a digital master? doesn't make sense...
  20. What vinyl are you spinning right now??

    always a good idea...
  21. Kanye West

    This is not a dumb question at all. I think what you're expressing is a perfectly legitimate understanding of rap culture. But like everything else, however, there's more to it than that... As I see it, MCing is quite a bit like jazz in that it's not so much speed as it is *control*. Famed mid-80's New York MC, Rakim, admits that he modeled the cadences and melodies of his raps on bop and soul-jazz horn players. Give him a listen if you get the chance. If you neglect the words and pay attention instead only to the sounds, it's not at all unlike Lou Donaldson...only Rakim is a tremendously gifted lyricist as well. One of the chief tendencies in rap culture is the manipulation (read: deconstrucion) of other media. And these media manifest themselves in a number of ways: Anglo English, recorded sound, etc. Lyrically, this is often expressed by twisting originally intended (read: the canonical) meanings of words around by, for example, playing homnyms against one other. It is also paramount that one choose his/her verbage based on the percussive qualities of each word (the placement and selective use of harsh consonants, long vowels, etc). You can think of this as the "keys," "pads," or "amboucheure" of the hip hop MC. Musically, the guys who really appreciate the culture use only small portions of several completely different samples in a loop...a kick drum from a Dusty Springfield record here...a ride from a Grant Green record there...maybe the organ from a campy 60's psych horror film. (This says nothing, of course, for the fact that every sample has to be individualy EQed to work with the rest!) Add to this the necessary--and wildly ambiguous--element of *soul* and you've got yourself a pretty tall order, as creative and culturally loaded endeavors go. It ain't easy...
  22. Kanye West

    Kanye West is the Puff Daddy of the backpacker scene: an arrogant ass who honestly thinks he's revolutionizing music--not just hip hop, but music in general--by rehashing Golden Era production (Pete Rock, Diamond D, Lord Finesse, etc) for today's mega-huge rap stars...as though no one had ever sampled dusty soul records before. Sorry to be the old crumudgeon here, but c'mon...
  23. What vinyl are you spinning right now??

    I love that Colbeck record, and your quite right about the drumming...out of this world. (We've talked about this many times.) If I had that on LP i would have worn it out by now...
  24. Worst guitar solo EVER.

    Drove to San Jose today to drop off/pick up some transcription discs we farmed out to an audio guy down there. Among the things heard on the radio was "Owner of a Lonely Heart" by Yes. Talk about not being "greazzzzy"...
  25. What vinyl are you spinning right now??

    Mountain Music of Peru (Folkways FE 4539)