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JSngry

Raymond Scott Orch - Tiger Rag (1955)

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Not a clue, but this sure brought back memories! I used to watch the show when I was a kid, and remember how awkward and out of touch the show seemed when they tried to come to terms with rock & roll a couple of years later!

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I'm fairly certain the trombonist (who played the solo) is Urbie Green.

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Ah! One down!

Nobody can ID the drummer?

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Wow. Where do they find these shows?

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Ah! One down!

Nobody can ID the drummer?

I wondered about him -- nice break toward the end.

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interesting arrangement because it veers between the very generic/conventional and the slightly personal and very warm -

Edited by AllenLowe

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I'm fairly certain the trombonist (who played the solo) is Urbie Green.

I vote for Al Cohn as the tenor player. (Too bad they only show his hands during the solo).

As I recall, Scott was married to the featured singer Dorothy Collins at the time. Took home two healthy paychecks from that show...

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I'm fairly certain the trombonist (who played the solo) is Urbie Green.

I vote for Al Cohn as the tenor player. (Too bad they only show his hands during the solo).

As I recall, Scott was married to the featured singer Dorothy Collins at the time. Took home two healthy paychecks from that show...

Too jowly for Al at that time, I think, also looks about 10 or more years too old for him, and it sure doesn't sound like Al -- a kind of proto-Sam the Man Taylor vibe. Maybe Al Klink, who could sound like anyone on cue.

Boy, I used to think Dorothy Collins was cute, which is kind of pathetic in retrospect -- going for that scrubbed, nice-girl image and the rabbity slight-overbite. An extension of the teacher's crush, but what are you going to do at age 12 or so? IIRC, the Collins-Scott marriage ending in severe strife.

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I'm fairly certain the trombonist (who played the solo) is Urbie Green.

I vote for Al Cohn as the tenor player. (Too bad they only show his hands during the solo).

As I recall, Scott was married to the featured singer Dorothy Collins at the time. Took home two healthy paychecks from that show...

Too jowly for Al at that time, I think, also looks about 10 or more years too old for him, and it sure doesn't sound like Al -- a kind of proto-Sam the Man Taylor vibe. Maybe Al Klink, who could sound like anyone on cue.

Boy, I used to think Dorothy Collins was cute, which is kind of pathetic in retrospect -- going for that scrubbed, nice-girl image and the rabbity slight-overbite. An extension of the teacher's crush, but what are you going to do at age 12 or so? IIRC, the Collins-Scott marriage ending in severe strife.

Truth time. I was there too. I had a crush on Dorothy Collins as a 10 year old in 1955. You're right, Larry - must have been a teacher's crush thing.

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Truth time. I was there too. I had a crush on Dorothy Collins as a 10 year old in 1955. You're right, Larry - must have been a teacher's crush thing.

As long as there were quite a few male teens who had a crush on somebody as homely and unhip as the McGuire Sisters (and there MUST have been) there's nothing to be ashamed of. :D:D

BTW, Dorothy Collins' vocal attempts at coming to grips with rock'n'roll are fun indeed (e.g. "My Boy Flat Top"). (Don't know if they were recorded with Raymond Scott's orchestra providing the backing, though)

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I'm fairly certain the trombonist (who played the solo) is Urbie Green.

I vote for Al Cohn as the tenor player. (Too bad they only show his hands during the solo).

As I recall, Scott was married to the featured singer Dorothy Collins at the time. Took home two healthy paychecks from that show...

Too jowly for Al at that time, I think, also looks about 10 or more years too old for him, and it sure doesn't sound like Al -- a kind of proto-Sam the Man Taylor vibe. Maybe Al Klink, who could sound like anyone on cue.

Boy, I used to think Dorothy Collins was cute, which is kind of pathetic in retrospect -- going for that scrubbed, nice-girl image and the rabbity slight-overbite. An extension of the teacher's crush, but what are you going to do at age 12 or so? IIRC, the Collins-Scott marriage ending in severe strife.

You're right - Al never sounded remotely like this player. Is the soloist actually the taller non-spectacled guy? If it is he looks and sounds a bit like Mickey Folus, who was unlucky enough to sit next to Flip throughout the first herd, and a very good soloist in his own right. The arrangement sounds like Buster Harding.

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Urbie was obvious, but that's as far as I dare go. Amazing how dated this is, not just musically, but confederate flags and pushing cigarettes with a smile. Damn!

BTW, I knew the producer, Bill Nichols, he also produced and wrote "Chicago and All That Jazz," an all-star (and I do mean all-star!) early color Dupont Show of the Week that I was involved in. Sad to say, Bill took his own life.

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