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Hardbopjazz

$750 LPs Are Hot Sellers at this store.

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As everyone at this board is well aware, vinyl just sounds better than anything else, but paying these prices are way too much.

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You could buy a song on iTunes for $1.29. Or listen for free (with ads) from Spotify or Pandora or other sites. Or, you can go to Better Records and pay $500 or more for a vinyl LP of the same songs.

The online store’s offerings are mostly classic albums like Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon or Carole King’s Tapestry. They aren’t obscure bootlegs or limited-edition collectables. But just those two records will cost you a whopping $749.99 and $349.99, respectively.

Just do the math, that’s 2,344% more than the $31.99 Amazon charges for a new vinyl copy of Pink Floyd’s iconic double album. And 4098% more than a $18.30 CD. ( It is two discs, after all. Correction: As many readers noted, of course The Wall is the Pink Floyd double album, not Dark Side.)

Full article.

https://www.yahoo.com/makers/why-this-record-stores-750-lps-are-hot-sellers-112730604250.html

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As everyone at this board is well aware, vinyl just sounds better than anything else...

Two myths, one sentence. Nicely done!

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I like listening to vinyl. Without spending too much money, it really can be a great listening experience.

I have seen this site before ... these folks are crazy.

Edited by Eric

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Vinyl is a fetish more than an experience. Music is the only thing you're listening to. You either prefer it clean and clinical via digital, or you prefer an extra helping of harmonic distortion for that "warmer" sound.

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Either/or. I'm streaming to my stereo right now, perfectly content, with shelves of LPs to my left, shelves of CDs to my right.

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I'd guess the cost per CD/LP in this room is $8. Less if I factored in box sets?

The average resale value is probably $4. Rough guess.

The sound on most is more than acceptable to the point where I really don't give a shit what the bit depth is.

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Either/or. I'm streaming to my stereo right now, perfectly content, with shelves of LPs to my left, shelves of CDs to my right.

Right there with you, with the exception I got rid of my LP's when we moved from Florida. If we hadn't made such a big move, I'd likely still have them. But, since I also stream to my main stereo, both they and my 1,000+ CDs would both be getting similar usage. Which is none...

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Vinyl is a fetish more than an experience. Music is the only thing you're listening to. You either prefer it clean and clinical via digital, or you prefer an extra helping of harmonic distortion for that "warmer" sound.

:tup

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One does not experience one's fetishes?

My, how uncommitted!

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Clumsy wording on my part. I should have said it's no more of a listening experience than any other playback medium.

There may be more exercise involved...

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If one compare listening music to having sex, and my opinion it is less strange then one could argue, I still prefer an harmonic distorted and warm partner then a clean and clinical one. Matter of taste I presume. :crazy:

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If one compare listening music to having sex, and my opinion it is less strange then one could argue, I still prefer an harmonic distorted and warm partner then a clean and clinical one. Matter of taste I presume. :crazy:

So, you prefer to pay large sums of money, beyond some flowers. Noted.

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Not really, I just find that records suit my listening taste more then digital, cd of downloaded, period.

I bought only one records from Better Records, and it was 50 bucks, they have them too, it was a Brian Eno record I found awful sounding on cd.

Said that I listening to cds as well.

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It's all in the mastering; I have crappy sounding LPs and crappy sounding CDs. I also have records that sound better then the CD and CDs that sound better then the record. It's a case by case scenario over here...

The whole CDs vs Vinyl militant arguing bores me to tears...to each his own...why push your opinions on other people

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It's all in the mastering; I have crappy sounding LPs and crappy sounding CDs. I also have records that sound better then the CD and CDs that sound better then the record. It's a case by case scenario over here...

The whole CDs vs Vinyl militant arguing bores me to tears...to each his own...why push your opinions on other people

Agree on all points

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In the media vinyl fetishists get too much attention. That, and too many ignorant people just assume that vinyl is by default better than digital.

I have nothing against vinyl collectors like yourselves. I know I was glad to be rid of vinyl once I heard the clean clear sound of CDs in the late 80s.


Agreed that it's in the mastering.

Edited by erwbol

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I can see the appeal of vinyl. The two sides that provide a natural break after 20 minutes, the rituals associated with playing the albums, the large sleeves etc.

But what never seems to get mentioned when extolling the virtues of vinyl are the clicks, pops, warps, off-centre pressings and inner groove distortion that bedevilled so much vinyl when I was buying it in the 70s/80s. The first play of an LP was agony as you sat on tenterhooks, praying it was a decent pressing.

I know many vinyl enthusiasts love all that business of setting the weight of the cartridge but it just used to fill me with anxiety.

CD banished all of that for me. In the early days there were a lot of very disappointing CD reissues - things rushed onto CD without care. I suspect a lot of the negativity towards CD comes from that.

I've never felt any of the 'coldness' that some people claim to hear in digital formats.

Mp3s have, however, brought an equivalent to the bad pressing. The carelessly 'gapped' album. Only happens occasionally now but a bloody pain in the neck when it does. I've yet to find a programme that can de-gap some of these simply. There are ways of correcting them but they are labour intensive. Surprised this has not been solved. Though I suspect that inbuilt flaw is there for a reason - to persuade us to upgrade to the newly emerging 'high quality' download formats. The industry still makes a mint from inbuilt obsolescence.

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ill freakin find my own hot stampers, thank u very much. its like any collecting, sure u can buy the $1,000 stamp, or u can hunt and find it in the wild

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But what never seems to get mentioned when extolling the virtues of vinyl are the clicks, pops, warps, off-centre pressings and inner groove distortion that bedevilled so much vinyl when I was buying it in the 70s/80s. The first play of an LP was agony as you sat on tenterhooks, praying it was a decent pressing.

There are times - only times, mind you - when I actually enjoy all that for the memories it brings of hearing music on a "get it while, where, and when" can basis, becuase there were so many things that that was the only way you could get to the music in question. Like, I was real bad about going through my parent's friends record collections and asking them if they really wanted this LP, and if not, could I have it. Or, as I got older, just any occasion for going inside somebody's house was an excuse to look through their records and then buy that record if they didn't really want it, and never mind once I started hangling out with older musicians and their girlfriends and their dealers and all THAT kind of circuit. Or radio stations, even, be on a road trip, pass by some out in the boonies radios station, ask them if they had any old copies of shit they're never play ever again. It didn't always work, but often enough, it did.

And sometimes, hell, the noise and the imperfections and especially the reverb-added and or "electronically re channeled for stereo" horrors, time and place, for real. Big time, one that I'm not conjuring up, one that I'm revisiting.

Of course, that's listening to the record, not listening to the music. But if that's how you first, and in a few cases, still, the only way you heard it, then that's where the music is, if only because back then, I was too naive to tell the difference.

And as far as ambiance - I mean, who really wants to hear a clean copy of a Ramsey Lewis record like In Crowd or Sloopy instead of a crackpoppy beat up battered POS/POW of a copy? Where's the residual party in that, eh? Those are the kinds of records that were meant to be fucked up!

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Vinyl is a fetish more than an experience. Music is the only thing you're listening to. You either prefer it clean and clinical via digital, or you prefer an extra helping of harmonic distortion for that "warmer" sound.

I like that warmer sound.

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