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Dan Gould

Covid Vaccination Poll Update

Covid Vaccination Poll as life returns to "normal"   60 members have voted

  1. 1. My vaccination status:

    • I am fully vaccinated right now
      30
    • I have had one shot of a two shot regimen and will be fully vaccinated in the coming weeks, with a firm date for second appointment
      12
    • I have had my first shot but do not know/have my doubts about getting the second shot on time (or I am already late on the second shot due to government decision-making
      2
    • I want a shot, will take a shot, any shot.
      5
    • I want a shot but would really prefer a specific vaccine
      4
    • I don't need no stinking vaccine
      1
    • I don't need no stinking vaccine for a non-existent "virus"/it's got a tracking device/will mess up your DNA
      2
    • None of the above.
      0
  2. 2. Post vaccine ...

    • I will continue to wear a mask happily
      44
    • I will wear a mask but won't be happy about it, I should flash a vaccine ID and be excused from mask wearing
      7
    • Never wore one anyway.
      1
    • None of the above
      4
  3. 3. As we head into Spring

    • I worry about another surge post-Spring Break
      20
    • I feel like the end is near, in a good way.
      17
    • I feel like the end is near, in a bad way.
      0
    • I worry that Covid will be around forever - too many vaccine skeptics, too many variants
      19

Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

213 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

I’ll keep wearing them as long as the general idea is that more people wearing them is prudent for public health.

Sure my glasses fog up under certain temperature/humidity conditions — and it’s harder to communicate without facial expressions as clear — but none of that is anything more than a little annoying (at worst).

We’re all in this together, and ideally everyone ought to do what they can to encourage the kinds of “herd behaviors” that will help stop this thing — and I’m genuinely “relatively glad” to wear a mask all the rest of 2021 (though hopefully not for the next decade).

What won’t fly everywhere, I realize — but here in DC I expect we’ll all be wearing masks indoors well into the summer and fall, or for however the mask mandates are in place.

Outside everyone still wears them here too, but I expect that to start to fade in the next couple months — human nature being what it is. 

Edited by Rooster_Ties

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10 hours ago, Ken Dryden said:

The science is inconclusive about how much protection a mask provides. I am more likely to lose a hearing aid from removing a mask then to get COVID-19 at this point. I have both shots and spend a lot of time at home when not running an errand or dining out. I still avoid the gym and haven’t flown anywhere since fall 2019.

Mask wearing is about protecting others and while it's clear that the vaccines prevent serious cases, they don't prevent all infections. And its not known if such infections of the innoculated can spread to others. So mask wearing is the prudent thing to do for your fellow citizen.

As a hearing aid user I sympathize Ken, especially after recently having to switch from a neck-secured mask to one secured behind the ears. Mine usually get tied up with the elastic string. But I am not about to lose one because I feel the ear mold coming out (and would immediately realize the loss of hearing acuity. The one thing I do worry about is having one fall out and be damaged on pavement but once I realize they are intertwined, I just stop taking it off until I am in the car and then it's safe.)

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When we look back on this episode of our history, what will stand out above everything else will not be the deaths, the hospitalizations, the collective insecurities, no, what will stand out will be how inconvenienced we were.

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As I see more & more pictures of 20-somethings partying away without masks, it weirdly coincides with more & more stories I am hearing about 20 & 30-somethings coming down with serious cases of COVID, some with debilitating aftereffects (cardiac & respiratory).

The numbers are climbing right now. This is just not the time to unmask and certainly not because a mask is "inconvenient". Really? That's a reason to endanger your fellow man?

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6 hours ago, Dan Gould said:

Mask wearing is about protecting others and while it's clear that the vaccines prevent serious cases, they don't prevent all infections. And its not known if such infections of the innoculated can spread to others. So mask wearing is the prudent thing to do for your fellow citizen.

As a hearing aid user I sympathize Ken, especially after recently having to switch from a neck-secured mask to one secured behind the ears. Mine usually get tied up with the elastic string. But I am not about to lose one because I feel the ear mold coming out (and would immediately realize the loss of hearing acuity. The one thing I do worry about is having one fall out and be damaged on pavement but once I realize they are intertwined, I just stop taking it off until I am in the car and then it's safe.)

I’m in the same boat on hearing aids. When I get out of the car, off they come.

As far as mask wearing goes, the science that I’ve read is pretty conclusive. 

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20 hours ago, Brad said:

As far as mask wearing goes, the science that I’ve read is pretty conclusive. 

+1

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+1 We all read in the best places apparently.

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Do they have hearing aids for being tone-deaf?

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Auto-tuned?

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iStock-1218071840.jpg

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On 4/4/2021 at 9:25 AM, JSngry said:

When we look back on this episode of our history, what will stand out above everything else will not be the deaths, the hospitalizations, the collective insecurities, no, what will stand out will be how inconvenienced we were.

Speak for yourself.  Here's what will stand out for me:

Clorox Concentrated Germicidal Bleach 121 Oz - Office Depot

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Is bleach ever convenient?

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On 3/29/2021 at 6:02 AM, JSngry said:

Forever is a long time....but it's here to stay, like flu (finally, it IS like flu in one way!), and I trust vaccine science to keep pace.

But too many unvaccinated people running wild...that only goes one way, we're not going to defy gravity or anything like that.

But I got my shots, have waited my two weeks, and now feel free to go out to selected spots, wearing that mask, and getting back inside once done.

Long way to go on this one...stil...

I think this is the right analysis.

IMHO most of the most irritating day to day restrictions will be removed pretty soon.  I'm not certain about the persistence mask wearing; I suspect that depends a lot on local social norms, plus context (I'm likely to keep wearing it on public transit for some time but may abandon it when walking the dog), how prevalent cases are once vaccination uptake reaches certain levels.  (Per JSngry's comparison to the flu, we could see a seasonal surge for at least a few more winters).

I follow public health experts on social media pretty closely and, while they aren't super happy about the regional surges we're seeing in Michigan and the Northeast, they're far less worried about them than they were about the prior 3 waves.  You already see in the data that hospitalizations among the elderly (the most vaccinated group) aren't rising in 4th wave areas.

On 4/4/2021 at 3:07 AM, Rooster_Ties said:

I’ll keep wearing them as long as the general idea is that more people wearing them is prudent for public health.

Sure my glasses fog up under certain temperature/humidity conditions — and it’s harder to communicate without facial expressions as clear — but none of that is anything more than a little annoying (at worst).

We’re all in this together, and ideally everyone ought to do what they can to encourage the kinds of “herd behaviors” that will help stop this thing — and I’m genuinely “relatively glad” to wear a mask all the rest of 2021 (though hopefully not for the next decade).

What won’t fly everywhere, I realize — but here in DC I expect we’ll all be wearing masks indoors well into the summer and fall, or for however the mask mandates are in place.

Outside everyone still wears them here too, but I expect that to start to fade in the next couple months — human nature being what it is. 

I agree with this general analysis.  While vaccination rates are still pretty low (which will be true in the US for a few more months, and in continent Europe somewhat longer), masking is a good norm to keep up even for the vaccinated.  (I guess you have the option of walking around unmasked with your vaccination card taped to your chest.) 

There's growing evidence that (as expected) the vaccines are pretty clearly showing signs of reducing transmissibility as well as symptoms - public health messaging on this ("we don't know...") is proving to be overly cautious, though it may still serve a useful public health purpose for the time being.  i.e. in areas with high vaccination rates, a vaccinated person will have zero need to wear a mask, and mask wearing norms will not be necessary.  Common sense behavior might be less clearcut for the unvaccinated in high-vaccination areas or the vaccinated in low-vaccination areas.

23 hours ago, bresna said:

As I see more & more pictures of 20-somethings partying away without masks, it weirdly coincides with more & more stories I am hearing about 20 & 30-somethings coming down with serious cases of COVID, some with debilitating aftereffects (cardiac & respiratory).

My guess is at least part of the reason we're hearing more and more about sick young people is because the other, even grimmer story (older people getting killed by the virus) is becoming fortunately less frequent due to vaccination.

On 4/4/2021 at 6:25 AM, JSngry said:

When we look back on this episode of our history, what will stand out above everything else will not be the deaths, the hospitalizations, the collective insecurities, no, what will stand out will be how inconvenienced we were.

I actually think it WILL ironically be a major part of the story - that the US and Europe basically chose to tolerate a lot of avoidable deaths due to personal inconvenience.

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Finally, my mom and dad got their invitation too now. They are both 70 years old. Though I am well aware COVID could be dangerous for everyone of any age, it was my parents that I was most worried about from the beginning. 

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10 minutes ago, Pim said:

Finally, my mom and dad got their invitation too now. They are both 70 years old. Though I am well aware COVID could be dangerous for everyone of any age, it was my parents that I was most worried about from the beginning. 

That's great news. 

My parents (both in late 80s) get their second doses next week.  Only then will I feel comfortable visiting them for the first time in 18 months.

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good news, Pim.

Got my second dose of Moderna on Friday -- other than some soreness and fatigue, and a slight fever for a couple of hours yesterday, I'm fine. Glad to be vaccinated.

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Got my second dose of Pfizer on Friday. Hit me harder than the first. . . sore arm, stiff shoulders and neck and fatigued for two days. Better today. My wife who got both shots right alongside me was VERY tired Friday, which she took off, and yesterday, but she does sleep a lot on the weekends--she's still working.

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1 hour ago, mjazzg said:

That's great news. 

My parents (both in late 80s) get their second doses next week.  Only then will I feel comfortable visiting them for the first time in 18 months.

 

1 hour ago, clifford_thornton said:

good news, Pim.

Got my second dose of Moderna on Friday -- other than some soreness and fatigue, and a slight fever for a couple of hours yesterday, I'm fine. Glad to be vaccinated.

 

51 minutes ago, jazzbo said:

Got my second dose of Pfizer on Friday. Hit me harder than the first. . . sore arm, stiff shoulders and neck and fatigued for two days. Better today. My wife who got both shots right alongside me was VERY tired Friday, which she took off, and yesterday, but she does sleep a lot on the weekends--she's still working.

You Americans and Britons are doing so much better with the vaccination policy and strategy. Glad for you guys you’re protected now!

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admittedly I was rather sceptical that the US would be able to pull off what it has so far in this process.

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I was very sceptical that the UK government would achieve what they have having had a parlous record on the entire Covid response.

I don't think it's a coincidence that the vaccine programme wasn't tendered out to the private sector, like so much else in the response, but kept well within the NHS.

So it's really the health sector's success rather than government.

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I belong to the first priority group (80+) and got finally my second dose of BioNTech on Thursday – without any side effects ... :) 

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What I am wondering about in the US: is the success with vaccinating nationwide or a there big differences between states?

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We're making good progress nationally in general, but there is disparity among the states. Also, we're dealing with a robust population of deniers and skeptics, so that's also a factor.

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Yeah, that is very true. Glad to be in NY, although my former home state of Texas has actually been doing reasonably well, at least in the more urban areas. Dunno about rural spots, probably on par with other rural areas in the country.

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I was in Kroger yesterday to pick up a prescription and the pharmacist told me to tell anybody/everybody that they had vaccine on hand and available for walk-ups.

Not that sounds good, and it is, but...Kroger had be advertising "availability at selected locations" for several months now and it's just now getting out there for general availability. So people went elsewhere, I'm sure. I know I did.

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