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Dave Holland at the Library of Congress


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:tup Dave Holland Quintet played at the Library of Congress last night, and I'll tell you, the DC folks were treated to an incredible jazz performance. While I've always liked Holland's recordings, and really dug the Live at Birdland double cd set last year, this performance went many levels higher than anything I've heard. Part of the reason was the enthusiastic crowd, and the other was the incredible playing of his group, especially the new drummer, Nate Smith. I think he will be to Holland like Brian Blade is to Wayne Shorter -- he is a dynamic, aggressive musician, who propelled everyone with a hard and varied rhythms. They introduced a few new compositions that will appear on their next cd -- one dedicated to Holland's granddaughter, and another by Chris Potter. I can only describe it, very poorly, by saying it was like listening to the Jazz Messengers with the aura of the Bobby Hutcherson/Joe Chambers collaborations, but harder. I left feeling exhilerated and gasping for breath at the fierceness of the performance and excellent compositions. Being the Library of Congress, they were required to do some sort of tribute, and Holland did a Mingus composition solo, and the group did a Mingus influenced tune, written by Robin Eubanks, I believe. All I can say is -- go see these guys!!!
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Being the Library of Congress, they were required to do some sort of tribute, and Holland did a Mingus composition solo, and the group did a Mingus influenced tune, written by Robin Eubanks, I believe.

Why were they required to do a tribute?

I've seen the quintet twice in Philly & they gave great shows both times.

Edited by alankin
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Part of the reason was the enthusiastic crowd, and the other was the incredible playing of his group, especially the new drummer, Nate Smith. I think he will be to Holland like Brian Blade is to Wayne Shorter -- he is a dynamic, aggressive musician, who propelled everyone with a hard and varied rhythms.

A big right on! Saw them in January, and Nate Smith made my jaw drop.

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They were required because it is part of the sponsorship for having shows at the Library of Congress. The musicians either contribute a composition written for this concert, or in this case, in honor of a musician who they have a large collection in their holdings. Cecil Taylor wrote a composition for the Library, a duet with Matt Manieri, when he performed there.

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They were required because it is part of the sponsorship for having shows at the Library of Congress. The musicians either contribute a composition written for this concert, or in this case, in honor of a musician who they have a large collection in their holdings. Cecil Taylor wrote a composition for the Library, a duet with Matt Manieri, when he performed there.

OK, that makes sense.

By the way, Bridge Records is due to release the Cecil & Mat Maneri recording later this month!

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They were required because it is part of the sponsorship for having shows at the Library of Congress.  The musicians either contribute a composition written for this concert, or in this case, in honor of a musician who they have a large collection in their holdings.  Cecil Taylor wrote a composition for the Library, a duet with Matt Manieri, when he performed there.

OK, that makes sense.

By the way, Bridge Records is due to release the Cecil & Mat Maneri recording later this month!

:blink: The classical label? Is this their first Jazz release?

Edited by 7/4
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By the way, Bridge Records is due to release the Cecil & Mat Maneri recording later this month!

:blink: The classical label? Is this their first Jazz release?

I think so. But I think this was a commissioned composition, so I suppose it counts as a classical piece...

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These 'commissioned pieces' are a back-door the Library of Congress uses to put on jazz concerts. They have some money from a fund (it's called McKim, I think) to commission a violin/piano duet from a composer, and they then build a concert around that.

I've seen several concerts there where this was applied in different ways:

- Oliver Lake and his quintet (including Russell Gunn, Charles Eubanks and Cecil Brooks III) ran through some originals and a few of the Dolphy/Little collaborations. The second set opened with the duet, which was a classical-type piece played by Anthony Davis and Regina Carter.

- Cecil Taylor chose to turn the whole concert into what I suspect was a completely improvised duet piece with Matt Maneri. I was told he played a bit of solo piano in the second set. I left after the first set, because I really could not stand Maneri's sawing away. He's part of that slew of avant-garders I just can't bear to listen to - pretentious crap with no aesthetic value whatsoever. Music is meant to be enjoyed, not suffered through.

Bertrand.

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I'm very, very happy to hear that Nate Smith is working out well with the band. When Billy Kilson left, I was heartbroken and wondered how they'd ever recover from that loss. I'm glad to hear that they've found a good replacement. Haven't seen them yet with Smith, but looking forward to it!

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The concert was amazing. The sound on Potter was terrible while Eubanks really projected very well. Nate Smith is up there with Bill Stewart and even Tain. He is a master of metric modulations within tunes. Few know that he did not attend Berklee or any of the NY schools - he attended VCU (Virginia Commonwealth University) and is from a few hours South of DC.

I was soooooo happy they did Blues for CM. That is such a beautiful pastiche of Mingus' style of composition. The drone of the horns outdid the record.

They could have featured Steve Nelson a little more. He is so conscientious of what is going on around him. I saw several instances where he backed away from a chord that he was comping with because he didn't want to overstep the bounds and walk on top of a soloist. Nelson is in a school of his own as far as technique and consistent originality is concerned - IMO 10X better than Bobby Hutcherson. Stefon Harris is closer but Nelson makes those guys look like amateurs.

I would love to hear Arthur Blythe use Steve Nelson for chordal interplay. For those of you who don't know - Blythe usually uses drummer Cecil Brooks III, tubist Bob Stewart (a monster), and Gust William Tsilis on marimba. My idea is to substitute Nelson for Tsilis. That would be an interesting record.

P.S. Robin Eubanks is quite possibly the most emotionally stimulating and heady trombonist on the scene. He ranks among the top guys - John Fedchock, Brookmeyer (though that's a different story). When are they gonna do a Eubanks family recording like the Marsalis' did. That would be tight.

matt

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Since I posted the original thread about this show, I would like to just add that I am glad that some people on the Board from the DC area did make it. As you may recall, I was myself unable to attend because of a prior committment.

I will look forward to the new album featuring the great new drummer and can only hope that Holland and company will come back to DC again in the next few years (I did catch them at the Kennedy Center in the past, so it seems that do come to the area from time to time).

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I've seen the Quintet (twice), Octet and Big Band, and it's been excellent every time. Both times I saw the Quintet, Nate Smith was playing (the first time, a few years ago, as a sub, the last time (in March, I think) as the "new guy"). As a sub, he was clearly reproducing Billy Kilson's role, whereas now he is clearly doing his own thing, which is different but will doubtless become just as cool over time.

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Cannonball Addict:

I'm not aware of any general calendar or listing for jazz events in Washington, DC (or any other city for that matter) here on the site (or anywhere else). As far as I know, what tends to happen is that when Board Members become aware of good shows, they start a link on the Live Shows & Festivals Thread. My most recent thread in that respect was about the Joe Lovano Birth of the Cool concert at the Kennedy Center this Friday.

As for keeping track of other upcoming events, I tend to consult the Kennedy Center page, read the Washington Post and the City Paper (even if its listings are not always accurate, many of the clubs like Blues Alley advertize in its pages, providing good schedules), this website, etc.

Edited by HWright
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Cannonball Addict:

I'm not aware of any general calendar or listing for jazz events in Washington, DC (or any other city for that matter) here on the site (or anywhere else)....

Well, there's a page for Philadelphia jazz concerts ----> phillyjazz.Jazzmatazz.info

I often see some of the site's staff at concerts. :D

Coming up:

Kevin Norton's Living Language

- with John Lindberg, Tomas Ulrich and Louie Belogenis

- Slought Foundation, 4017 Walnut Street, Philadelphia

May 21 (Fri) - 8-10 pm - $12

The Philly Five

- John Swana/Chris Farr/Tony Miceli/Madison Rast/Dan Monaghan

- with guest vocalist Meg Clifton

- Chris' Jazz Cafe, 1421 Sansom St, Philadelphia

May 22 (Sat) - 9 pm - 1 am - $10

Dave Burrell

- solo piano

- Burrell has a new CD with the Full Blown Trio, Expansion (High Two)

- Philadelphia Art Alliance, 251 S 18th St, Philadelphia - 215.545.4302

May 28 (Fri) - 5:30-9 pm - Free

Luciana Souza

- Philadelphia Museum of Art, Great Stair Hall, BF Parkway & 26th, Philadelphia - 215.763.8100

June 4 (Fri) - 5:45-6:45 & 7:15-8:15 pm - $10 (free for members)

Ari Hoenig Quartet

- featuring Jean Michel Pilc

- Drummer Ari Hoenig's debut release as a leader is: The Painter: Live at Fat Cat (Smalls Records)

- Chris' Jazz Cafe, 1421 Sansom St, Philadelphia

June 4-5 (Fri-Sat) - 9 pm - 1 am

Chris Potter Quartet

- Philadelphia Museum of Art, Great Stair Hall, BF Parkway & 26th, Philadelphia - 215.763.8100

June 11 (Fri) - 5:45-6:45 & 7:15-8:15 pm - $10 (free for members)

Lukas Ligeti and Raoul Björkenheim

- Slought Foundation, 4017 Walnut Street, Philadelphia

June 11 (Fri) - 8-10 pm - $12

Dr. Lonnie Smith

- Zanzibar Blue, Broad & Walnut Sts, Philadelphia - 215.732.5200

June 11-12 (Fri-Sat) - 8 & 10 pm

Jorrit Dijkstra/John Hollenbeck duo

Claudia Quintet

- with Chris Speed, Matt Moran, Drew Gress and Ted Reichman

- Slought Foundation, 4017 Walnut Street, Philadelphia

June 17 (Thu) - 8-10 pm

Tomasz Stanko Quartet

- with Marcin Wasilewski, Slawomir Kurkiewicz, Michal Miskiewic

- their new CD is Suspended Night (ECM 1868 )

- Slought Foundation, 4017 Walnut Street, Philadelphia

June 19 (Sat) - 8-10 pm

Edited by alankin
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