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BFT 38 - Disc One Answers


cannonball-addict
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The answers to Disc 1: (comments w/ sidemen will follow sometime soon)

1. "A Joyful Noise (For JW)" by pianist Bruce Barth from the MaxJazz release [n]East And West

2. "I Think My Wife Is a Hat" by bassist Steve Swallow from the XtraWatt release Deconstructed

3. "Carla'nin Ikinci Tangosu" by pianist Ayse Tütüncü Üclüsü from the EMI Turkey release Panayir

4. "Song For Midwood" by pianist Vijay Iyer from the 2005 Savoy Jazz release Reimagining

5. "Thirty Foot Ceiling" by pianist Jim Ridl from the 2005 Dreambox Media release Door In A Field

6. "Rather Not" by bassist Emmanuel Vaughn-Lee from the 2005 Fresh Sound New Talent release Previous Misconceptions

7. "Paz" by trumpeter Tom Harrell from the 2003 Bluebird release Wise Children

8. "Fleure" by pianist Bryn Roberts from the 2005 Fresh Sound New Talent release Ludlow

9. "Radio Dial/These Foolish Things" by pianist Michel Petrucciani from the Dreyfus Jazz release Au Théâtre des Champs-Elysées

10. "Unknown" by guitarist Jim Hall Quartet with Greg Osby from a live artist-recorded bootleg recorded at Umea, Sweden on October 26, 1991

11. "Ting For Ray" by bassist Reuben Rogers from the 2006 self-released album The Things I Am

COMMENTS TO FOLLOW SOON!

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  • 2 weeks later...

A start....more coming

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Bruce Barth - A Joyful Noise (For JW) composed by Steve Wilson

MaxJazz 2001

Barth - piano; Terell Stafford - trumpet; Steve Wilson - alto/soprano saxes; Ugonna Okegwo - bass; Al Foster - drums

Bruce Barth is one of my favorite living pianists playing straight-ahead jazz. For my money, he's just as good as anyone out there (save Dave Burrell, Vijay Iyer, and Herbie Hancock - but none of these guys fit nicely into any one sub-genre of jazz). I put him up there on the level of pianists like Mulgrew Miller, John Hicks, Kenny Kirkland, Jacky Terrasson, Frank Kimbrough, Kevin Hays, Rick Germanson, Michael Weiss, Dave Kikoski, etc.

This is a recording I purchased online after seeing Bruce play with a saxophonist named Tim Armacost in DC at Blues Alley. His technique, craft, and soulfulness blew me away. I will never forget that night because in a moment of intense improvisation, the piano bench gave way and he fell backwards off the stage. :o:lol:

With Steve Wilson and Terell Stafford as well as Al Foster on the drums, this band is unstoppable. "A Joyful Noise 'For JW'" was written by the saxophonist Wilson. The latter part refers to the late James Williams, whom many of the cats on the NY scene today both miss a lot and owe a debt of gratitude (for his unending support and caring for young musicians). Wilson (who came to prominence playing with Chick Corea, Dave Holland's Quintet, and with Mulgrew Miller. He recently replaced Tim Ries in Maria Schneider's reed section (in the Alto 1 chair). I wanted to include some music from his CDs as well but I thought this song best represented his sound and style. But some would appreciate his alto playing more, which is equally if not more fiery. I recently saw Wilson with org board member Michael Weiss at the Kitano Hotel in NY and the band was really smokin'. Weiss and Wilson have a long working relationship that Mike can tell you more about.

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Steve Swallow - Deconstructed (WattXtraWatt)

Personnel: Swallow - elec. bass; Steve Cardenas - elec. guitar; Chris Potter - tenor sax; Ryan Kisor - trumpet; Adam Nussbaum - drums

This track was chosen by mistake. I meant to choose another track off this CD called Lost in Boston but oh well. I am not terribly partial to this track but I do very much enjoy Steve Swallow's bebop for the electric bass writing style. And these players - Chris Potter, Ryan Kisor, Steve Cardenas play the parts very well. My favorite Swallow disc which I didn't include here because I thought it would be too obvious and since I already included Potter in the BFT elsewhere (as a leader). But Adam Nussbaum's ability to really groove with Steve is remarkable. On the electric bass, I don't think there's been any better player since Jaco passed.

Ayse Tütüncü Üclüsü - Panayir

The inclusion of this track is explained above. It's spooky and I like that in my jazz. I also like celebrating jazz' international status as an art form. I always love discovering cats in other countries that I am totally no hip to. It amazes me the amount of music that we have no clue about that is always being made. This is part of a much larger connundrum of the vacuum in which jazz exists within the greater lexicon of music (recorded and unrecorded)....spooky...

Edited by jazzclinic
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4. "Song for Midwood" was chosen simply becuase I think Vijay Iyer is one of the most enthralling composer/performer/improvisers in jazz. He is a thoroughly studied, yet always in-the-moment musician whose ability to evoke so many dense moods is virtually unparalleled among his peers (i.e. those in his age group). I truly think Vijay holds a ton of promise for the future of jazz. Same goes for Rudresh Mahanthappa. These two guys have really got something amazing going on IMHO. I also really dig "Infogee Dub," "Phalanx," and

This particular recording was my #1 pick of 2005. I played this so much on the radio the listeners had it memorized just as well as Vijay, Rudresh, Stephan Crump, and Marcus Gilmore (who is Roy Haynes' grandson - also a very special drummer).

Matt

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Ayse Tütüncü Üclüsü - Panayir

The inclusion of this track is explained above. It's spooky and I like that in my jazz. I also like celebrating jazz' international status as an art form. I always love discovering cats in other countries that I am totally no hip to. It amazes me the amount of music that we have no clue about that is always being made. This is part of a much larger connundrum of the vacuum in which jazz exists within the greater lexicon of music (recorded and unrecorded)....spooky...

Is this something you can actually buy outside Turkey?

MG

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  • 4 weeks later...

5. "Thirty Foot Ceiling" by pianist Jim Ridl from the 2005 Dreambox Media release Door In A Field

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This is a CD that I was hipped to by my radio gig at Princeton University this summer. Ridl is a Philadelphia local who has played with a lot of national names but still keeps his home base in Philly. I understand he journeys up to NY often to play with saxophonist JD Allen.

This track is a really infectious hip-hop-ish groove that I really enjoyed from the first moment I heard it. I understand it can be a bit repetitive but I really like that ostinato thing in his left hand. The bassist is one of the young stars of the instrument today - Daryll Hall (winner of the 1995 Thelonious Monk Competition for Bass). The string section I don't care for so much on this CD but Ridl plays his ass off. A nod to a local guy basically...

Matt

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