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What Classical Music Are You Listening To?


StarThrower

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2 hours ago, HutchFan said:

Yes, this is true. Unlike his friends, Mstislav Rostropovich and Galina Vishnevskaya, David Oistrakh was always a "dutiful citizen" of the USSR. I'm not sure whether Oistrakh was a true believer or just appreciated the perks of being "politically reliable" (or, perhaps most likely, some combination of both). 

Well, apparently Oistrach said to Vishnevskaya and Rostropovich that unlike them "he is not a fighter". He lived through great terror of 1937-38 expecting to be arrested any night (most of the tenants in his apartment building eventually were), and this traumatized him deeply (same goes for Shostakovich who was sleeping on a camp cot right next to the entrance to his apartment so that if "they" came to arrest him in the night his pregnant wife and young daughter would not be woken up). Oistrach made a point of continuing playing Weinberg's Moldavian Rhapsody after his friend Weinberg was arrested in 1952. If not an act of active resistance, this was a principled (and potentially dangerous) stand.           

Edited by Д.Д.
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1 minute ago, Д.Д. said:

Well, apparently Oistrach said to Vishnevskaya and Rostropovich that unlike them "he is not a fighter". He lived through great terror of 1937-38 expecting to be arrested any night (most of the tenants in his apartment building eventually were), and this traumatized him deeply (same goes for Shostakovich who was sleeping on a camp cot right next to the entrance to his apartment so that if "they" came to arrest him in the night his pregnant wife and young daughter would not be woken up). Oistrach made a point of including Weinberg's Moldavian Rhapsody after his friend Weinberg was arrested in 1952. If not an active resistance, this was a principled (and potentially dangerous) stand.     

Interesting.  Thanks for sharing, D.D.

I knew that story about DSCH sleeping in the hallway, but I didn't realize that Oistrakh went through that same experience during 1937-38 also.

 

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6 hours ago, Д.Д. said:

Well, apparently Oistrach said to Vishnevskaya and Rostropovich that unlike them "he is not a fighter". He lived through great terror of 1937-38 expecting to be arrested any night (most of the tenants in his apartment building eventually were), and this traumatized him deeply (same goes for Shostakovich who was sleeping on a camp cot right next to the entrance to his apartment so that if "they" came to arrest him in the night his pregnant wife and young daughter would not be woken up). Oistrach made a point of continuing playing Weinberg's Moldavian Rhapsody after his friend Weinberg was arrested in 1952. If not an act of active resistance, this was a principled (and potentially dangerous) stand.           

Yep ....

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8 hours ago, HutchFan said:

Living in that sort of totalitarian state was . . . incredibly complicated. And nearly unimaginable for someone who hasn't lived through it (like me).

When the "Prague Spring" endet abruptly with Russian troops invading Czechoslovakia, some musicians of the CPO fled overnight only carrying their instruments with them.

These people received shelter @ Vienna. Many of them went on to Munich and reunited with Rafael Kubelik .... some labeled the SOBR  as "CPO in exile" at that time ...

I still remember it well ....

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25 minutes ago, HutchFan said:

I'm a fan of both Haskil and Fricsay -- but I've never heard that album.  I bet it's good.  

What are your impressions, Peter?

 

Hutchfan, I like this one. The orchestra sounds a little bit recessed, with the piano up front. However, the overall sound is fine.

As you like both Haskil and Fricsay, I can easily recommend it to you

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ab67616d0000b27354a2146f1041b47effcd5ceb

Recorded in September 1976 .... hard to coose between this reading and the performance from April 5th, 1977 with Symphonieorchester des Bayrischen Rundfunks (released on Audite) .... the Viennese strings are a bit silkier though ....

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