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The Lost Tapes: Charles Mingus Live In Detroit


bluesoul
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Sound quality is plenty good enough for what it is, can't wait for the release!

7 hours ago, Captain Howdy said:

You ever notice how lost tapes are always found?

Well, at least the ones that get released.  Hard to release a tape that remains lost!

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6 minutes ago, HutchFan said:

This is very exciting news. :tup:tup:tup 

Roy Brooks is wonderful... but I'm wondering: Was Dannie Richmond not with Mingus' band at this time?

I believe Dannie Richmond rejoined  Mingus some time in 1973, about the time of the Mingus Moves recording sessions. He had been in the Mark Almond Band,  which was a spin-off of John Mayall's Bluesbreakers. 

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3 hours ago, ghost of miles said:

Thanks for the heads-up--I'll definitely be ordering.  Glad for the nth time that I'm a CD guy, not an LP guy (LP version is twice the price).

On top of the price, the length of 3 of the 7 tracks exceeded an LP side, so they had to continue the track on the other side. Why buy the vinyl version with that kind of track slicing when you can get the tracks whole on the CDs? Makes little sense to me.

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In my forthcoming book I tell the story of the Strata Corporation -- a self-determination effort founded by trumpeter Charles Moore and pianist Kenn Cox (2/5 of the Contemporary Jazz Quintet) -- in 1969. The Strata Concert Gallery was one of their ventures. Among the performs were Ornette, Cecil, Mingus, Joe Henderson Sextet, Herbie's Mwandishi Sextet, Weather Report, Chick Corea Trio (Stanley Clarke/Horacee Arnold) and many who came in and played with Detroiters, including Archie Shepp, Stanley Cowell, Joe Chambers. In doing research, I dug up posters from these gigs and the original AFM artist contracts for a number of these performances. A lot of these were broadcast on WDET-FM and bootlegs have circulated. I've never heard the Mingus so I don't know if it's been around, but at least one of the Mwandishi performances has traded for years and is actually on YouTube. I tried to upload a photo of a poster that lists this Mingus gig among the others in early 1973 but the system is balking. You can see it here: 

 

Edited by Mark Stryker
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40 minutes ago, Stefan Wood said:

Same people.

 

10 hours ago, felser said:

Strata-East was modeled after Strata in Detroit, correct?

Yes, Strata was the progenitor of Strata-East. No, it's not the same people, though Stanley Cowell was an original member of Strata's board of directors and technically in charge of Strata's publishing arm, (This part of the Strata initiative never  got off the ground.) Cox and Moore started Strata in Detroit in 1969. Strata-East founders Charles Tolliver and Stanley Cowell had played at the Strata Concert Gallery and Cowell had known Cox and Moore going back to 1964, when Cowell was a grad student at the Univ. of Michigan and part of the Detroit scene. Tolliver and Cowell took inspiration from what the guys were doing in Detroit and for a time they were discussing the idea of functioning as an east coast subsidiary -- hence the name Strata-East. (There were brewing plans for a Strata-West too.) In the end, Tolliver and Cowell were wary of Strata's complex corporate model -- the Detroit guys literally sold stock to raise capital and set-up a grandly ambitious corporate structure that included recording, performance, publishing and management divisions. So Strata-East came into being as a separate entity with a different business model in which artists financed their own recordings and "the company" packaged and distributed the product. But Strata-East kept the the Strata name as an homage to their roots and similar self-determination philosophy.

 

Edited by Mark Stryker
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2 hours ago, Mark Stryker said:

 

Yes, Strata was the progenitor of Strata-East. No, it's not the same people, though Stanley Cowell was an original member of Strata's board of directors and technically in charge of Strata's publishing arm, (This part of the Strata initiative never  got off the ground.) Cox and Moore started Strata in Detroit in 1969. Strata-East founders Charles Tolliver and Stanley Cowell had played at the Strata Concert Gallery and Cowell had known Cox and Moore going back to 1964, when Cowell was a grad student at the Univ. of Michigan and part of the Detroit scene. Tolliver and Cowell took inspiration from what the guys were doing in Detroit and for a time they were discussing the idea of functioning as an east coast subsidiary -- hence the name Strata-East. (There were brewing plans for a Strata-West too.) In the end, Tolliver and Cowell were wary of Strata's complex corporate model -- the Detroit guys literally sold stock to raise capital and set-up a grandly ambitious corporate structure that included recording, performance, publishing and management divisions. So Strata-East came into being as a separate entity with a different business model in which artists financed their own recordings and "the company" packaged and distributed the product. But Strata-East kept the the Strata name as an homage to their roots and similar self-determination philosophy.

 

I learned something new.  Outstanding!  I look forward to reading your book, Mark!

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