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Tune that affect you emotionally.


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Good choice on Sonny.  His "You Don't Know What Love Is" would definitely be one of the greatest performances of that song, though some others are very powerful too.  For this thread, I usually think of the performance of the song over the song itself.

 

 

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Pharoah Sanders "Healing Song" on "Live at the East"
Ornette Coleman I already mentioned "Garden of Souls" and would like to add the theme of "New York" on "Ornette at 12" and the String Version on "Prime Design-Time Design". 
Mingus: Meditation on Integration, Orange is the Colour of her Dress
Charlie Parker: "Parker´s Mood"
Dizzy Gillespie: "I waited for you" 
Bud Powell: "Round Midnight" (on the 1962 video in Copenhaga, where he seems to play it exclusively for a girl in the audience). 
Miles Davis: "When I Fall in Love" (1956 Prestige), "My Funny Valentine" (1964) 
John Coltrane: "A Love Supreme" (the Seattle version), "Naima" (1966 Village Vanguard again)
Dave Liebman: "Your Lady" (Coltrane tune on "Drum Ode"), 

this is 9 examples okay? 
And for the 10th my only non jazz input: "Hildegard Knef:Für mich soll es rote Rosen regnen"
 

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14 hours ago, Gheorghe said:

Pharoah Sanders "Healing Song" on "Live at the East"
Ornette Coleman I already mentioned "Garden of Souls" and would like to add the theme of "New York" on "Ornette at 12" and the String Version on "Prime Design-Time Design". 
Mingus: Meditation on Integration, Orange is the Colour of her Dress
Charlie Parker: "Parker´s Mood"
Dizzy Gillespie: "I waited for you" 
Bud Powell: "Round Midnight" (on the 1962 video in Copenhaga, where he seems to play it exclusively for a girl in the audience). 
Miles Davis: "When I Fall in Love" (1956 Prestige), "My Funny Valentine" (1964) 
John Coltrane: "A Love Supreme" (the Seattle version), "Naima" (1966 Village Vanguard again)
Dave Liebman: "Your Lady" (Coltrane tune on "Drum Ode"), 

this is 9 examples okay? 
And for the 10th my only non jazz input: "Hildegard Knef:Für mich soll es rote Rosen regnen"
 

I mustn't miss out Bud.

Of his many wonderful compositions the one that gets me the most is "Dusk in Sandi".

 

Edited by BillF
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10 hours ago, BillF said:

I mustn't miss out Bud.

Of his many wonderful compositions the one that gets me the most is "Dusk in Sandi".

 

Dusk in Sandi, like Glass Enclosure seems to be a more classical aproach composition. They are very short compositions. 
It´s strange I have not played "Sandi" for 40 years but just writing now I still have it in the head and if I have it in the had I can play it. 
Though it never was part of my repertory (I don´t perform solo, I perform with combo) I had to play it since an expatriate US saxophonist always requestet it. After a gig, he asked me to get back on piano and play "Dusk in Sandi" just for him. Once I said "but I know so many other beautiful ballads" he insisted I play that one tune....

Those two tunes don´t appear on other recorded sources, though I think "Glass Enclosure" at least once was recorded with Mingus and Taylor at Birdland. It is possible it was such an ugly and cheap looking LP where date and personnel were on a little paper that was glued on the backcover (I once heard that Boris Rose "produced" records like that)....

But I think the material is on the four ESP Disks "Spring-Summer-Autumn-Wintersessions)

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45 minutes ago, Gheorghe said:

Dusk in Sandi, like Glass Enclosure seems to be a more classical aproach composition. They are very short compositions. 
It´s strange I have not played "Sandi" for 40 years but just writing now I still have it in the head and if I have it in the had I can play it. 
Though it never was part of my repertory (I don´t perform solo, I perform with combo) I had to play it since an expatriate US saxophonist always requestet it. After a gig, he asked me to get back on piano and play "Dusk in Sandi" just for him. Once I said "but I know so many other beautiful ballads" he insisted I play that one tune....

Those two tunes don´t appear on other recorded sources, though I think "Glass Enclosure" at least once was recorded with Mingus and Taylor at Birdland. It is possible it was such an ugly and cheap looking LP where date and personnel were on a little paper that was glued on the backcover (I once heard that Boris Rose "produced" records like that)....

But I think the material is on the four ESP Disks "Spring-Summer-Autumn-Wintersessions)

It looks like Chick Corea shares my enthusiasm for "Dusk in Sandi". YouTube and Spotify contain various versions by him. It's also been recorded by pianist Mike Melillo.

"Glass Enclosure" has been done by Benny Green (not surprised knowing his reverence for masterpieces of modern jazz piano) as well as by guitarist Pasquale Grasso. And, yes, Chick's recorded this one as well.

 

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15 hours ago, Milestones said:

Emotion, ranging from melancholia to unfettered joy, is one of main reasons for listening to music--thus the lists could be enormous.  

 

 

Amen to that!

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Somewhere Over the Rainbow/What a Wonderful World by Israel Kamakawiwoʻole, because it was played at my dad’s funeral. I also get an emotional charge from Don Byas playing I Remember Clifford and George Adams playing Send in the Clowns. For lifting my spirits almost  every time, Danny Gatton playing Linus and Lucy.

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On 5/6/2022 at 1:04 PM, Rooster_Ties said:

On the PBS special with Miles & Quincy Jones (when it first broadcast in late 1992 or early ‘93) — the first time I heard that rendition of “Boplicity”… …that definitely brought a couple tears to my eyes.

I was pretty deep into Miles by that point, having amassed at least 70% of his Columbia output in just 3 short years (lot of that was dubs on cassettes, mind you).

But that really brought it home that Miles was gone.

Also, I’m just remembering, I don’t think I was completely aware of the set-list — only that it was all Miles & Gil charts (but maybe I hadn’t expected “Boplicity” — or maybe I did know it opened the concert (I really can’t remember)…

But either way, I really wasn’t prepared to hear Miles modern timbre (warts and all) playing something from the 40’s. A very poignant moment, for me at the time.

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The Elvin Jones version of Frank Foster's "Simone"; Clifford Jordan's Glass Bead Games version of "John Coltrane"; The McLean version and the Tolliver Slug's version of "On the Nile";  Lee Morgan "The Gigolo"; Jefferson Airplane "Wooden Ships";  Joni Mitchell "Tin Angel"; Santana, the whole Caravanserai album, especially "Every Step of the Way"; Stevie Nicks "Edge of Seventeen"; Bruce Springsteen "The River".

Edited by felser
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Not me, exactly — but after my favorite jazz-loving uncle passed away in ~2012, my cousin (his daughter) said he wanted something called “Upper Manhattan Medical Group” played at his memorial service (something he must have either told her like a decade before, or maybe it was in his will or some other notes he’d prepared many years earlier).

She had no idea what that was (“was it an album?” she asked me, and had I ever heard of anything like that?). I figured it was probably the version Duke recorded on And His Mother Called Him Bill.

This was my same uncle whose 25+ years of Downbeat magazines I was very lucky to have inherited ‘inherit’ — thanks to my cousin, who otherwise might have donated them to our alma mater (where my uncle, her father, also taught for 40+ years).

Clearly UMMG meant a lot to him, and I do think of it when I hear it now.

Edited by Rooster_Ties
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36 minutes ago, Rooster_Ties said:

Not me, exactly — but after my favorite jazz-loving uncle passed away in ~2012, my cousin (his daughter) said he wanted something called “Upper Manhattan Medical Group” played at his memorial service (something he must have either told her like a decade before, or maybe it was in his will or some other notes he’d prepared many years earlier).

She had no idea what that was (“was it an album?” she asked me, and had I ever heard of anything like that?). I figured it was probably the version Duke recorded on And His Mother Called Him Bill.

This was my same uncle whose 25+ years of Downbeat magazines I was very lucky to have inherited ‘inherit’ — thanks to my cousin, who otherwise might have donated them to our alma mater (where my uncle, her father, also taught for 40+ years).

Clearly UMMG meant a lot to him, and I do think of it when I hear it now.

He might have known this version from 1959 -

sjku63sb.j31

 

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