Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Night Lights'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Found 243 results

  1. Hey gang, here's a new Night Lights show about saxophonist Percy France, subject of Dan Gould's recently-launched website. And this Night Lights episode was developed with considerable assistance from Mr. Gould! Hope you enjoy it: Out Of The Shadows: Percy France
  2. Posting this a bit early, since the holiday's coming up this weekend: Night Lights in the key of screeeech, with stalking monsters, road-weary Draculas, and the true tale of the jazz-loving New Orleans Mysterious Axman all part of this week's Halloween celebration. (As well as an early Gil Evans arrangement) Strange Enchantment: Jazz For Halloween
  3. From 1929 to 1947 trumpeter and singer Louis Armstrong, who had already made a series of seminal small-group recordings that would become a cornerstone of jazz history, rose to popular culture stardom, appearing in movies, becoming the first African-American to host a weekly radio program, and waxing a wealth of material for Decca and other labels that brought him greater commercial success, as well as critical controversy. I’ll be featuring music from those years on this edition of Night Lights, and we’ll also hear from Armstrong biographer Ricky Riccardi, whose recent book Heart Full Of Rhythm chronicles this key but often overlooked stretch of Armstrong’s career: Swing That Music: Louis Armstrong In The Big Band Era
  4. Jazz pianist Billy Taylor was also a broadcaster and educator who helped found the Jazzmobile organization in 1960s Harlem and wrote the civil-rights anthem “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free.” Celebrate his centennial today with a new Night Lights show that includes clips from his appearances on the 1958 TV show The Subject Is Jazz and his work as a jazz journalist for CBS News Sunday Morning With Charles Kuralt: The Teacher: Billy Taylor
  5. This past week’s Night Lights show explores pianist Bill Evans’ brief but significant stay with Miles Davis’ group in 1958-59, including some non-Kind Of Blue live and studio recordings: Kind Of Two: Miles Davis And Bill Evans
  6. A sequel to the previous Night Lights program of MLK jazz tributes Dear Martin is now available for online listening. It includes music from Herbie Hancock, Bobby Hutcherson, Dizzy Gillespie, Max Roach, and Wadada Leo Smith: Dear Martin, P.S.: More Jazz Tributes To Martin Luther King Jr.
  7. One 2020 flashback that's hopefully more enjoyable than the year in general (granted, a low bar to clear): Best Historical Releases 2020 Also realizing that I'm long past due figuring out a way to incorporate exclusively vinyl reissues (such as Blue Note's Tone Poet series) into these surveys. I can't honestly feature or say anything about them, because I don't buy new vinyl (for a variety of reasons)* and such releases never get serviced to radio (at least that I'm aware of). But I'm certainly aware that vinyl is the more popular format now for reissues and archival recordings. I may just start posting a general supplementary list of LPs that came out in the past year, more as a reference point than anything else. *Rare exceptions made for titles like the Sonny Clark trio album that came out on Record Store Day a couple of years ago and was initially announced as vinyl-only, though it was subsequently released on CD as well.
  8. Posting this week's Night Lights show a bit early, given that Christmas falls on Friday. Joe Pass, Paul Desmond with the Modern Jazz Quartet, and Judy Holliday are among the featured artists. Have Yourself A Very Quiet Christmas Happy holidays and all that jazz, David
  9. Last week’s Night Lights show was a centennial-year tribute to pianist Hazel Scott, a classically-trained prodigy who rose to fame from New York City’s Cafe Society nightclub at the beginning of the 1940s. Scott appeared in five movies, found popular success with her “swinging the classics” interpretations of music by composers such as Rachmaninoff and Chopin, and in 1945 married the charismatic minister and newly-elected Congressional representative Adam Clayton Powell Jr, forming an African-American power couple whose lives were covered extensively in the black press. But Scott’s outspokenness as a civil-rights advocate cost her jobs in Hollywood and a pioneering role as the first African-American woman to host a TV show. To Be Somebody: Hazel Scott includes some of Scott’s earliest recordings, two of her “swinging the classics” sides, two numbers from her movie appearances, two tracks from the 1955 trio album that she made with Charles Mingus and Max Roach, and more.
  10. Posting this week’s show, the first of a two-part tribute to Yusef Lateef, a bit early because today is his centenary. Mark Stryker, author of Jazz From Detroit (and well-known as a contributor to this forum) joins the program to talk about this key period in Lateef’s development as a musician: The Jazz Message Of Yusef Lateef: The 1950s
  11. Last week’s Night Lights show up for online listening: Jukebox Jazz: Jazz On 78s And 45s ... with an acknowledgement to this forum at the end of the program.
  12. In 1963 the sixth annual Monterey Jazz Festival included a blues duet between Gerry Mulligan and Peewee Russell, the festival debuts of Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk, a moving performance from Jack Teagarden just four months before his death at the age of 58, and a dedication from the Modern Jazz Quartet to Martin Luther King Jr., weeks after his “I have a dream” speech and days after the deaths of four African-American girls in a Birmingham, Alabama church bombing. Oh, and Dizzy Gillespie launched his “Dizzy For President” campaign as well. Last week’s Night Lights show up for online listening: Jazz From Monterey, 1963: Dizzy For President!
  13. Last week’s Night Lights centennial Bird tribute, featuring a Parker’s dozen of career-defining tracks, is up for online listening: Ornithology: A Brief History Of Charlie Parker
  14. Last week’s Night Lights show highlighting pianist Ahmad Jamal’s run of albums for ABC and Impulse from 1968 to 1971 is up for online listening: The Second Great Trio: Ahmad Jamal On Impulse
  15. Last week's Night Lights show, which delves into the music and history of New York City's Five Spot, is now up for online listening: Making A New Kind Of Scene: New York City's Five Spot It includes commentary from Five Spot regulars David Amram (also a Five Spot performer) and novelist Dan Wakefield, as well as live Five Spot recordings from Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane or Johnny Griffin, Eric Dolphy and Booker Little, and representational recordings by Cecil Taylor and Ornette Coleman, and poet Frank O'Hara reading "The Day Lady Died."
  16. Last week’s Night Lights show, broadcast in honor of drummer Shelly Manne’s centenary, is up for online listening: West Coast Manne: Shelly Manne In The 1950s It includes music from Manne’s collaborations with Shorty Rogers, Jimmy Giuffre, and Russ Freeman; an excerpt from Bill Holman’s Quartet; tracks from Manne’s recordings of the music from My Fair Lady and Peter Gunn; a sideman appearance with Ornette Coleman; a cut from the first Poll Winners album; and a live recording at the Black Hawk in San Francisco.
  17. "Woody Herman's Trip To Mars"

    Last week's Night Lights show, which draws on the recent Mosaic set of Woody Herman's recordings for Decca, MGM, and Mars, and which includes commentary from set annotator Jeff Sultanof, is now up for online listening: Woody Herman's Trip To Mars
  18. The latest in Night Lights’ ongoing series of jazz elegy programs is up for online listening. V. 6 focuses on recordings made in the 1970s and 80s by musicians such as Frank Strozier, Woody Shaw, Miles Davis, Charles Mingus in remembrance of Oliver Nelson, Jaco Pastorius, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, and other artists: Turn Out The Stars Volume 6
  19. This past week’s Night Lights show focused on Duke Ellington’s weekly broadcasts to help sell war bonds for the U.S. government while World War II remained underway in the Pacific. It includes some little-known Ellington compositions and unusual arrangements, as well as several of Ellington’s promotional spots for war-bond sales and some news bulletins that occasionally broke into the broadcasts: “The Duke Is On The Air”: Duke Ellington’s Summer 1945 Treasury Shows
  20. The new issue of the literary periodical Brilliant Corners includes a poem inspired in part by the Night Lights program The Jazz Monk: Thomas Merton. Though it's not available online, the poet (Betsy Sholl, former Poet Laureate of Maine) and publisher/editor Sascha Feinstein have given me permission to share it: "Thomas Merton Experiments with Meditations on Jazz" (Brilliant Corners is always well worth checking out, btw. Poetry, fiction, interviews, and other literary content all related to jazz.)
  21. Damn, pops, it's Professor Bop! This past week's Night Lights show about mid-century arbiter of the hepgeist Babs Gonzales is now up for online listening: How Professor Bop Paid His Dues: Babs Gonzales
  22. My annual take, with a number of recordings listed in the post that I wasn't able to include in the program itself. There's a note at the bottom about why the Mosaic Herman and Mobley sets are not present. Best Historical Jazz Releases Of 2019 I also didn't include the Miles Davis 1969 Lost Quintet concert because I actually haven't heard it yet (the import CD I received was defective and had to be returned) and the U.S. release is slated for next week. I'd say it's a promising candidate for the 2020 list.
  23. "ECM: Birth Of A Label"

    A new Night Lights for the week just ending is now up for online listening: ECM: Birth Of A Label Much appreciation to the posters who commented in my previous thread about this era.
  24. Last week’s Night Lights show, about songwriter Hoagy Carmichael’s Hollywood years, is now archived for online listening. It includes an introduction from John Hasse and archival interview commentary from Carmichael biographer Richard Sudhalter and longtime WFIU radio host Dick Bishop: Where The Rainbow Hits The Ground: Hoagy Carmichael In Hollywood
  25. A recent Night Lights program focusing on the brief but significant musical partnership of pianist Horace Parlan and saxophonist Stanley Turrentine is now available for online listening: Pittsburgh Soul Connection: Horace Parlan And Stanley Turrentine