Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
ghost of miles

"Thelonious Monk: From Myth to Man (Part 2)"

7 posts in this topic

Part 2 of the Night Lights program devoted to the life and music of Thelonious Monk with special guest Robin D.G. Kelley is up for online listening:

 

Thelonious Monk: From Myth To Man

 

Robin talks about why Monk went over so well at the Five Spot, his musical partnerships with John Coltrane and Charlie Rouse, his time at Columbia Records, his response to the free-jazz and civil-rights movement of the 1960s, his relationships with his wife Nellie and his friend Pannonica (the "Jazz Baroness"), and his late-period recordings and compositions.

 

Here's Part 1 of the program: Thelonious Monk: From Man To Myth

 

Next week: "Portraits of Harlem," featuring some previously unreleased excerpts from 1939 and 1945 broadcasts of James P. Johnson's Harlem Symphony, Duke Ellington's 1963 recording of his Tone Parallel to Harlem, Roy Eldridge's "I Remember Harlem" and much more, including an interview with John Howland, author of Ellington Uptown: Duke Ellington, James P. Johnson and the Birth of Concert Jazz.

Edited by ghost of miles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Part 2 of the Night Lights program devoted to the life and music of Thelonious Monk with special guest Robin D.G. Kelley is up for online listening:

Thelonious Monk: From Myth to Man (Part 2)

Robin talks about why Monk went over so well at the Five Spot, his musical partnerships with John Coltrane and Charlie Rouse, his time at Columbia Records, his response to the free-jazz and civil-rights movement of the 1960s, his relationships with his wife Nellie and his friend Pannonica (the "Jazz Baroness"), and his late-period recordings and compositions.

Here's Part 1 of the program: Thelonious Monk: From Man to Myth (Part 1)

Next week: "Portraits of Harlem," featuring some previously unreleased excerpts from 1939 and 1945 broadcasts of James P. Johnson's Harlem Symphony, Duke Ellington's 1963 recording of his Tone Parallel to Harlem, Roy Eldridge's "I Remember Harlem" and much more, including an interview with John Howland, author of Ellington Uptown: Duke Ellington, James P. Johnson and the Birth of Concert Jazz.

David, as in Kelley's book you've got an inadvertent cap-doff to the classic misspelling up there! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oops--fixed.

At least I didn't duplicate a certain paper's error a few years ago, in which a reporter wrote that a vocal group was influenced by "the famous jazz pianist Felonious Monk." (The noted grandfather of gangsta jazz!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oops--fixed.

At least I didn't duplicate a certain paper's error a few years ago, in which a reporter wrote that a vocal group was influenced by "the famous jazz pianist Felonious Monk." (The noted grandfather of gangsta jazz!)

Sorry to drag things down to my level.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.