StarThrower

What Classical Music Are You Listening To?

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LvB's Piano Sonatas for me too.

Pollini's recordings of Sonatas No. 28 and No. 29 "Hammerklavier":

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8 hours ago, HutchFan said:

LvB's Piano Sonatas for me too.

Pollini's recordings of Sonatas No. 28 and No. 29 "Hammerklavier":

81LMMlS2QbL._SS500_.jpg

Very interesting view on the late Beethoven Sonatas ....

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Kempff - Mozart Piano Concerto No.9, K.271 "Jeunehomme" (recorded in 1953)

Lange-Muller - Violin Concerto Op.69

and Langgaard - 81MnzYBMH0L._AC_UY218_ML3_.jpg61tMjvjHuqL._AC_UY218_ML3_.jpgViolin Concerto

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I accomplished to complete this serie finally.

23 Februari was Häendel's birthday so playing his music these days has something extra.

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Edited by Referentzhunter

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6 hours ago, soulpope said:

Very interesting view on the late Beethoven Sonatas ....

Yes, I agree.  Pollini's interpretation is analytical, cool, Apollonian.  He's certainly a child of A.B. Michelangeli, figuratively-speaking.  

It also seems like Pollini's technique is so formidable that he can negotiate this music without straining. I think that (almost) effortlessness is part of the equation too.

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1812 Ouverture & Polonaise & Walzer aus 'Eugin Onegin'

 

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Edited by Referentzhunter

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3 hours ago, HutchFan said:

Yes, I agree.  Pollini's interpretation is analytical, cool, Apollonian.  He's certainly a child of A.B. Michelangeli, figuratively-speaking.  

It also seems like Pollini's technique is so formidable that he can negotiate this music without straining. I think that (almost) effortlessness is part of the equation too.

Pollini blows my mind in Beethoven...I think his structural grasp is a huge benefit in these later sonatas in particular, where the musical forms are so radical. Take e.g. the slow movement of the Hammerklavier - he has no trouble making those 17+ minutes hold together. Also - the 'cool' thing - I do understand this, but I don't necessarily always sign up to the characterisation. The way he treats the repeated G major chord in op.110 before the inversion of the fugue just at the end of the piece is mesmerising and almost shocking to me in his hands; or for another example, the intensity of the last movement of his op.57. Anyway - for sure just a personal thing!

I can't wait to hear his just-released new recordings of 109, 110, and 111.

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1 hour ago, Alexander Hawkins said:

Also - the 'cool' thing - I do understand this, but I don't necessarily always sign up to the characterisation. The way he treats the repeated G major chord in op.110 before the inversion of the fugue just at the end of the piece is mesmerising and almost shocking to me in his hands; or for another example, the intensity of the last movement of his op.57. Anyway - for sure just a personal thing!

I've only heard the late sonatas, so I can't speak to the rest of his cycle. But I find the Pollini readings that I do know to be very powerful.  I can hear "cool", but I definitely don't hear "cold".

Also, I didn't know that Pollini had re-recorded the last three. Would love to hear your impressions.

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11 minutes ago, HutchFan said:

I've only heard the late sonatas, so I can't speak to the rest of his cycle. But I find the Pollini readings that I do know to be very powerful.  I can hear "cool", but I definitely don't hear "cold".

Also, I didn't know that Pollini had re-recorded the last three. Would love to hear your impressions.

Cool/cold - that's a really interesting point - yes, agree! BTW - I mentioned his Appassionata...I love the DG recording of course, but there are some incredible live ones. This one in particular I think is pretty astonishing: 

I saw him play this sonata in London a few years back, and it was frankly one of the most transcendent live music experiences I've ever had!

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Motivated by Hutchfan and others

Piano Sonata No. 28

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Edited by Referentzhunter

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3 hours ago, Alexander Hawkins said:

I saw him play this sonata in London a few years back, and it was frankly one of the most transcendent live music experiences I've ever had!

Ah, that's wonderful.  You'll keep memories of that concert with you all your life. :tup 

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Piano Concertos Nos. 15 & 16

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Edited by Referentzhunter

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In the morning .... :

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Thereof Opus 18 Nr. 2+3+4 ....

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Next in line .... :

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Thereof Sonata 32 Opus 111 ....

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