webbcity

BFT 194 Link and Discussion

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I love Track 14. I have this album, but could not remember who it was until the spoken introductions at the end. 

Back to the top:

Track 1. I like this a lot. Appealing head, energetic solos. I think it is from after 1990. It could be a very recent release. 

Track 2.  I have previously identified this as Richard Davis, from the Total Package album, with Ricky Ford. 

Track 3.  The unmistakable sound of Tyrone Washington!

Track 4. This is odd. This is an old song. I distinctly hear in my mind, a white blues band singing it, someone like Roomful of Blues or Lil' Ed and the Blues Imperials. There is a long time blues/older R&B show on public radio in my city and it has been played on that show. I find this arrangement and performance to be a bit of a mess. The song is too slight for such an intense production, in my opinion. The white blues band performed it more as a novelty number. 

Track 5. That is Mary Halvorson on guitar. It has to be. She has a very distinct style and sound. I have not kept up with her entire recorded output. I like this track a lot. Very interesting composition and very well, and intensely played, by all. 

Track 6.  A heavyweight alto sax player, influenced by Ornette. I can't place this. I have never heard it before, somehow. I like the drummer a lot too. 

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Ok, crazy month, no time for sergeants or for sustained listening, so yes I read ahead and can now only post reactions, not guesses.

TRACK ONE - Well, ok. Good for the, whoever they are.

TRACK TWO - Oh my, I have this record, and of course did not recognize it! Rick Ford! I very much like the way he evolved, coulda been another one of those guys sho didn't find a voice because all they wanted to do was "sound go", but he went for the voice thing, and got there (and kept going, the longer he goes, the more quirky he gets, in the good way.. Need to pull this one back out at some point.

TRACK THREE - Tyrone, from Roots. There's another guy who had a voice, and then, I guess, hear a voice calling him to do something else, so, he did. Between this one, Do right, and the Brains On Fire stuff, there's a whole set of Tyrone Washington that has nothing to do with "Blue Note". Just sayin'...Oh yeah, Hubert Eave throwin(g) down!

TRACK FOUR - Ah, James Carter, that all makes sense. After Leroy Cooper, and early Ronnie Cuber, this is where that thing goes if you don't want to do Hammiet BluiettI. like if you like ALL of Leo Parker's records, not just the bebop ones,  do like this, I do, but I'd like it more if I didn't know the original so well for so long. The new singer just does not cut it for me like Fluffy Hunter did ("deef"! "burries!), not even close (+ handclaps are usually a plus. Allow me (and dig that frantic piano being the tenor solo, somebody's about to OD on the urge to bebop!)..

But James Carter knows what he's doing and why he's doing it. Keep on doing it for a while, please! (but do NOT forget Fluffy Hunter!)

TRACK FIVE - why can't that be Chico Hamilton? I mean, no reason, right? For that matter, why can't it be Abdul Wadud? There's two people who could have made a record together but didn't. Life is not fair. For that matter, how is thet not Sonny Sharrock? Oh well, if these are not those people, let's take assurance that those people were those people themselves, and that's how we got here, I give thanks for all of that.

TRACK SIX - I can't argue with that! Sonny Simmons was a baaaaad amn! Totally. and check out Barbara Donald! Amazing! Those peopole weren't jsut "energy" players, they had all put int he time to learn and play "regular" music as well, you can't fake that, just like you can't fake the power of what they chose to do instead. Heroes!

TRACK SEVEN - Marion Brown, ok. Some of his things, I have to be in the mood for, and this is one of them. And I'm afraid I'm not.

TRACK EIGHT - Carmen McRae, of course. I've gone decades not caring for here too much at all, but the last year or so, I seem to be coming around, so...I do like this one a good deal. Solos, yeah, whatever, but she's dealing.

TRACK NINE - Ok, I wasn't sure who this was, but somebody referenced Tatum, and I DO know that quiet as it's maybe kept, Stanley Cowell  is DEEP into Tatum. And sure enough:

R-3949927-1350239560-5658.jpeg.jpg

Stanley Cowell is a very accomplished musician, which seems like a kind of a DUH thing to say, but go listen to the Piano Jazz show he did, he talks about Tatum and all that stuff, Most of the records he's made as many things, but not this, and this is some very serious piano playing. That left hand is alont Hines-ian the way ot goes wandering but never actually wanders...remind me to never play poker with Stanley Cowell.

TRACK TEN - Perry Robinson is pretty unmistakable and this is a great record. First the farmer, then the son, then comes...?

TRACK ELEVEN - So this is Braxton? What record? I don't have it, and I want it. Kicks ass! But that does not sound like Braxton on alto?!?!?!?!! it almost sounds like Zorn? Who are these people?

TRACK TWELVE - ID'ed as Ed Blackwell, who, really, is the only drummer that is going to do that. But as ususal, I can't get all in on Moondoc. I just can't. But with those guys behind him, I don't worry about that. But why does it sound like there's two alto solos if there's only one alto player?

TRACK THIRTEEN - Cedar doing a Don Schlitten Prestige, already 'id-ed and discussed. I do like it as history, and would note that one ignores those late-60s
Schlitten Prestiges at their own peril, thee are some..."intersting" things going on in those records.

TRACK FOURTEEN - Ari Brown is an unsung giant. Simple as that.

This was a really good mix. Thanks for doing it!

 

Ok, so that's NOT Braxton. GOOD! Barbecue that was just too weird if that was him playing alto. The overtones stuff does put me in mind of Zorn, though, and I do like the record.

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Moving on to the rest of the tracks:

 

Track 7. This is lovely. I have no idea who it is. I am sure that I have never heard it before.

Track 8. That is Carmen McRae singing. I am not familiar with the album. 

Track 9.  This is a mature artist, with a lot of technique, but also compelling ideas, a personal sound, and depth to his or her playing. It sounds like the Maybeck piano series era, and since it is live, is it a Maybeck? I can't place who it is. It does not sound like John Hicks, George Cables, or Mulgrew Miller. This pianist is on their level though. 

Track 10. I do not know this album but I love it. I will have to buy it.

I previously discussed the rest of the tracks. This is a very interesting Blindfold Test. Everything is excellent. 

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On 5/22/2020 at 11:49 PM, mjzee said:

I listened to this BFT without reading any of the prior comments.

Track 1: Sounds like early-80's, Woody Shaw-ish.  Trumpeter was showing off his good range and articulation.  The tenor is playing in and out, covering all notes, at the expense of personality.  Overall, kind of a frantic performance.

Track 2: They should've played "My Favorite Things" rather than an original that's a derivation of same.  The tenor plays fast at the expense of real emotion.

Track 3: Happy Apple?  I like the energy.

Track 4: Pretty funny.  The sort of record that used to be sold from under the counter.  Remember "Shaving Cream" by Benny Bell?  Good baritone on this track.

Track 5: Too cluttered, unpleasant to listen to.  They're trying too hard.  A lot of energy, with seems to be a common thread in this BFT.  This would've been called "skronk" back in the day.

Track 6: Ornette or a disciple.  Like bashing your head against a wall.  I'm not a fan.  Stopped the track after 3 minutes.  The problem with this stuff is, in its own way, it all sounds the same.

Track 7: Finally, some pretty melody.  Wish it wasn't so modal and actually went somewhere, but it was a nice ride.

Track 8: Nice to hear a singer.  Don't know who it is.  Singer prioritizes her chops instead of the emotional import of the lyrics.

Track 9: Jitterbug Waltz.  Can't anyone play it straight tonight?  Again, too many notes, but he/she resolves his/her lines nicely.  Tries to out-Tatum Tatum.  Reminds me of the Joni Mitchell line: "The times you impress me most are the times you don't even try."

Track 10: Another Ornette disciple.  See my comments to track 6, though this isn't as noisy.  Not my cup of tea.

Track 11 & 12: More of the same.

Track 13: Come Sunday.  Nice performance.  The drums were a little busy.

Track 14: Again, not a fan.  It's OK, but just not distinctive.  I can identify this one: The Ari Brown Quartet! (Yes, I listened to the end.)

Thanks for putting the BFT together.  I know how much work it can be.  Wish I could have enjoyed it more, but we all have different tastes.

 

Yep, all good, our ears are all different, as it should be. Sorry you didn't find more to enjoy. 

On 5/24/2020 at 11:33 PM, Hot Ptah said:

Track 11 sounds like James Carter to me. I am trying to remember an album featuring him which has a second saxophonist though. 

I love Track 12. I should know this but I do not. I probably have it in my collection, or albums featuring each musician here. 

Track 13 is a very unusual arrangement in which Duke Ellington's "Come Sunday" pokes through. I want to know what this is!!!

 

I am skipping around this BFT and listening to different tracks repeatedly. I will have more comments in the days to come. 

Not James Carter on track 11. I'll be very pleasantly surprised if someone guesses this one. Not because these are unknown players, but it's very early in all of their careers.

Track 13 *is* Come Sunday! This one has been ID'd which I'm sure you've seen by now. Love the album this is from, it's a favorite. What a band!

On 5/24/2020 at 6:09 PM, Hot Ptah said:

I love Track 14. I have this album, but could not remember who it was until the spoken introductions at the end. 

Back to the top:

Track 1. I like this a lot. Appealing head, energetic solos. I think it is from after 1990. It could be a very recent release. 

Track 2.  I have previously identified this as Richard Davis, from the Total Package album, with Ricky Ford. 

Track 3.  The unmistakable sound of Tyrone Washington!

Track 4. This is odd. This is an old song. I distinctly hear in my mind, a white blues band singing it, someone like Roomful of Blues or Lil' Ed and the Blues Imperials. There is a long time blues/older R&B show on public radio in my city and it has been played on that show. I find this arrangement and performance to be a bit of a mess. The song is too slight for such an intense production, in my opinion. The white blues band performed it more as a novelty number. 

Track 5. That is Mary Halvorson on guitar. It has to be. She has a very distinct style and sound. I have not kept up with her entire recorded output. I like this track a lot. Very interesting composition and very well, and intensely played, by all. 

Track 6.  A heavyweight alto sax player, influenced by Ornette. I can't place this. I have never heard it before, somehow. I like the drummer a lot too. 

Believe it or not, I didn't realize that announcement was at the end of track 14! Oops! Hahaha

You are the first to ID Tyrone Washington on track 3! Hadn't listened to this one in a while but when I pulled it out again recently I knew it had to go on this BFT.

You are also correct that the guitarist on track 4 is Mary Halvorson. She is an absolute wizard on this track, IMO. And on this entire album. It's not under her name though.

Thanks for listening, for your interest, and great comments!

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Comments below in red...

On 5/24/2020 at 7:37 PM, JSngry said:

Ok, crazy month, no time for sergeants or for sustained listening, so yes I read ahead and can now only post reactions, not guesses.

TRACK ONE - Well, ok. Good for the, whoever they are.

TRACK TWO - Oh my, I have this record, and of course did not recognize it! Rick Ford! I very much like the way he evolved, coulda been another one of those guys sho didn't find a voice because all they wanted to do was "sound go", but he went for the voice thing, and got there (and kept going, the longer he goes, the more quirky he gets, in the good way.. Need to pull this one back out at some point.

TRACK THREE - Tyrone, from Roots. There's another guy who had a voice, and then, I guess, hear a voice calling him to do something else, so, he did. Between this one, Do right, and the Brains On Fire stuff, there's a whole set of Tyrone Washington that has nothing to do with "Blue Note". Just sayin'...Oh yeah, Hubert Eave throwin(g) down!

Hell yes!

TRACK FOUR - Ah, James Carter, that all makes sense. After Leroy Cooper, and early Ronnie Cuber, this is where that thing goes if you don't want to do Hammiet BluiettI. like if you like ALL of Leo Parker's records, not just the bebop ones,  do like this, I do, but I'd like it more if I didn't know the original so well for so long. The new singer just does not cut it for me like Fluffy Hunter did ("deef"! "burries!), not even close (+ handclaps are usually a plus. Allow me (and dig that frantic piano being the tenor solo, somebody's about to OD on the urge to bebop!)..

But James Carter knows what he's doing and why he's doing it. Keep on doing it for a while, please! (but do NOT forget Fluffy Hunter!)

Believe or not I hadn't heard the original of this, and was obviously missing a key part of its significance. Thanks for posting that! I agree that the singer on the Carter version isn't nearly is good, but put it in the BFT for Carter's solo, whose solo blows my socks right off every time I play this track.

TRACK FIVE - why can't that be Chico Hamilton? I mean, no reason, right? For that matter, why can't it be Abdul Wadud? There's two people who could have made a record together but didn't. Life is not fair. For that matter, how is thet not Sonny Sharrock? Oh well, if these are not those people, let's take assurance that those people were those people themselves, and that's how we got here, I give thanks for all of that.

Amen to that. I hear you on Hamilton/Wadud/Sharrock and the influences are clearly there!

TRACK SIX - I can't argue with that! Sonny Simmons was a baaaaad amn! Totally. and check out Barbara Donald! Amazing! Those peopole weren't jsut "energy" players, they had all put int he time to learn and play "regular" music as well, you can't fake that, just like you can't fake the power of what they chose to do instead. Heroes!

I'm glad you called out Barbara Donald--truly someone deserving of more recognition.

TRACK SEVEN - Marion Brown, ok. Some of his things, I have to be in the mood for, and this is one of them. And I'm afraid I'm not.

TRACK EIGHT - Carmen McRae, of course. I've gone decades not caring for here too much at all, but the last year or so, I seem to be coming around, so...I do like this one a good deal. Solos, yeah, whatever, but she's dealing.

I don't listen to all that many singers myself-- something I need to change. McRae is someone who has come into sharp focus for me over the last few years. Her phrasing is just SO killer, and she also strikes me as someone who does her thing with a total sense of freedom.

TRACK NINE - Ok, I wasn't sure who this was, but somebody referenced Tatum, and I DO know that quiet as it's maybe kept, Stanley Cowell  is DEEP into Tatum. And sure enough:

R-3949927-1350239560-5658.jpeg.jpg

Stanley Cowell is a very accomplished musician, which seems like a kind of a DUH thing to say, but go listen to the Piano Jazz show he did, he talks about Tatum and all that stuff, Most of the records he's made as many things, but not this, and this is some very serious piano playing. That left hand is alont Hines-ian the way ot goes wandering but never actually wanders...remind me to never play poker with Stanley Cowell.

Nailed it! Yep, people kept mentioning the Tatum influence and I was thinking the whole time... "you're definitely onto something..."

TRACK TEN - Perry Robinson is pretty unmistakable and this is a great record. First the farmer, then the son, then comes...?

TRACK ELEVEN - So this is Braxton? What record? I don't have it, and I want it. Kicks ass! But that does not sound like Braxton on alto?!?!?!?!! it almost sounds like Zorn? Who are these people?

Nope, not Braxton (as you said below). Excited to reveal this one. As I said above, I'll be pleasantly shocked if anyone gets this.

TRACK TWELVE - ID'ed as Ed Blackwell, who, really, is the only drummer that is going to do that. But as ususal, I can't get all in on Moondoc. I just can't. But with those guys behind him, I don't worry about that. But why does it sound like there's two alto solos if there's only one alto player?

I'll admit I had trouble getting into Moondoc for a while too, but I do love this one, as well as a couple other of his records I have. "Revolt of the Negro Lawn Jockeys" on Eremite is a killer.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Cedar doing a Don Schlitten Prestige, already 'id-ed and discussed. I do like it as history, and would note that one ignores those late-60s
Schlitten Prestiges at their own peril, thee are some..."intersting" things going on in those records.

TRACK FOURTEEN - Ari Brown is an unsung giant. Simple as that.

This was a really good mix. Thanks for doing it!

Thank YOU for checking it out and for your insightful comments.

Ok, so that's NOT Braxton. GOOD! Barbecue that was just too weird if that was him playing alto. The overtones stuff does put me in mind of Zorn, though, and I do like the record.

 

Edited by webbcity

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