Jump to content

CJ Shearn

Members
  • Posts

    4,620
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Donations

    0.00 USD 

Posts posted by CJ Shearn

  1. 1 minute ago, JSngry said:

    So, by jazz, you mean...what, exactly?

    Or Blue Note, for that matter, but my hunch is that the first question answers the second? 

    People getting into the music might hear about Blue Note and wonder what it's about but I like your question by jazz what exactly do I mean? Kind of fuzzy because we could say music originated by Black Americans but now evolved and played the world over by everyone. Perhaps I'll change the title a bit and make it a bit clearer the goal of the article. Thanks!

  2. On 7/18/2022 at 8:15 AM, mikeweil said:

    I ended up using the new Micromega player in my bedroom as it sounds better with the Micromega MyAmp amplifier than with the Marantz. With the latter I had to turn the volume up so much that the neighbours started complaining. In my (smaller) bedroom I am closer to the speakers (Focal as in the living room) and the higher frequencies are more prominent. And the CD-30 sounds excellent, very detailed, with the MyZic / Focal Spirit Classic combination. I'm satisfied. 

    I love Focal. I have a pair of Focal Chora 826's which sound fabulous with my Audiolab CDT6000 (which Lon recommended to me) Schiit Bifrost 2 DAC, Sony X700 blu ray player (for SACD and Blu ray audio) and Marantz NR1200 preamp and Marantz MM7025 power amp 

  3. On 7/23/2022 at 1:16 PM, Jim Duckworth said:

    I use Apple Music but utilize my physical collection most of the time.  I've found Apple Music useful as it allows me to stream playlists etc. from my Itunes throughout my house-an essential feature for me.  

    I use Amazon HD but primarily to test drive albums but also if I'm a bit tight on money I'll listen to something until I get it but my CD and SACD's as my primary mode of listening 

  4. On 8/7/2022 at 11:01 AM, hopkins said:

    I'm an audiophile! But I'm not obsessed with getting the best versions of albums, especially considering how costly it would be. When I have the choice I avoid purchasing bad quality versions issued by  "dodgy" labels - if I can find one from a known "respectable" label at a reasonable price. 

    I'll spend more for Mosaic box sets, and have quite a few, but it's really about the music offered (and the liner notes). I don't really care how the "manufacturing process" works, and I'm happy with CDs, I don't care whether it's digital or analog. In fact, I just received yesterday Mosaic's latest :)

    But if you purchase one of these MOFi albums, then you are really paying for the quality of the manufacturing process only, not for the music or liner notes. 

    From an economic standpoint, I'd rather see money spend on preserving music, issuing unreleased material, and generally contributing to our knowledge of the music, than see people spend large amounts of money on one more version of "Kind of Blue". So I guess I don't have much sympathy for either side in this MOFi fiasco. 

    I'm with you on this. I like to get the best versions when I can, thankfully after the fire when I rebuilt my system and collection, my friend's dad gave me a bunch of OOP  Japanese CD's, SACD'S and  I'm very happy with. I have about 60 ish SACD and dig it

  5. On 8/7/2022 at 7:39 AM, jcam_44 said:

    Esposito’s YouTube is a good watch most of the time and he does irritate a lot of people. I started watching him when he was dragging ERC for their quality. He made a good argument. The beef with him and Fremer was hilarious. Fremer is a tool imo. He’s the quintessential audiophile dork. 

    I just can’t believe Esposito is only 37… I would have guessed much older. 

    I know right? I'm 41 and look way younger than Mike Esposito, most people think I'm in my early 30's and transitioning to female and being on hormones, the youthfulness really comes out more, but I have good genes.  I've been following this shitshow and my friend and I just make fun of Fremer and co. any chance we get.  The fact Fremer wanted Geoff Edgers to revise his article because he was "misrepresented" shows he has really thin skin and a huge ego.  He hasn't learned the ego is an illusion, a shell.  I subscribe to Esposito's channel, 45 RPM Audiophile and Ken Micallef's but refuse to for Fremer because a) I don't deal with vinyl, b) it's too impractical for me and c) he's an asshat.  I do have my issues with Micallef because he tends to always argue the superiority of original BN pressings (or Liberty and UA era) over Tone Poet's etc.  I've heard many TP's sound spectacular.  The other issue I have with Micallef (I have to respect he's done far more interviews than I have but I know how it works) he often looks very stupid because he does poor research at times, and has gotten embarrassed in certain interviewers.  His beef with the Miles estate and him crapping on Miles with Jazz Sheppard (another buffoon) is ridiculous.  I happen to be friends with Vince Wilburn, we are in Lenny White's Zoom chats most weeks, after the fire he checked on me several times to see if I was cool. The business side is one thing, the personal quite another, he's a nice guy. Lenny is great fun too, sometimes I'll just call him and chat. I think Jazz Sheppard (not the place for this) has white guilt and for some reason Miles is a threat to him... someone dead for over 30 years threatens you that much? You need help!

    On 8/7/2022 at 3:50 PM, bresna said:

    I've been reading about this over on the Hoffman forums and I've tried to hold back on posting about it because I'm afraid my attitude might upset a few posters. I think this is awesome. It finally shut up all of the golden eared music listeners who claimed that only AAA can sound good and that they can "hear" analog.

    I've been saying for years that analog in and of itself does not guarantee great sound but nothing I've said has had any effect on most of them and the Hoffman forums' rules preclude anyone from calling them out on it. Mobile Fidelity finally showed them that the emperor has no clothes.

    Michael Fremer would never concede embarassment, LOL.

  6. 20 hours ago, Rabshakeh said:

    I had not clocked that record before. I listened to volume 1 last night and it is really exactly what you'd hope for. It is also nice to heard Whalum getting a chance to really wail, which you don't always on the more cuddly records designed for radio play. Are the other volumes as strong?

    I'm not sure... the overly religious connotation kind of steers me away, but that's who Whalum is and have to accept him for it, but the music can be enjoyed regardless . He also really stretches on the Mack Avenue Superband albums and "Impressions" on Joey Defrancesco's Live at the 5 Spot

  7. 5 hours ago, clifford_thornton said:

    Cool -- will check this. Have you read Francis Gooding's piece on reevaluating smoov jazz in We Jazz Magazine? Available for purchase here: https://wejazzrecords.bandcamp.com/merch/we-jazz-magazine-spring-2022-tetragon

    No because its behind a paywall so have not read it.

    15 hours ago, Teasing the Korean said:

    Thanks for posting.

    A couple of thoughts:

    • I completely agree with your opinion of CTI between 1970 and 1974, although I am not fond of Bob James.  But any of these albums from that period with either Deodato or Don Sebesky contributions are very worthwhile.  I associate the 1974 cutoff date with the arrival of disco in late 1974, not that I'm knocking disco, but that early-70s introspective, urban, minor-key, black-consciousness aesthetic was largely traded in for a forget-your-troubles-and-shake-your-booty ethos.
    • The cultural shifts at around 1974/75 are fascinating.  Disco arrived in a big way.  Jaws created a new paradigm for the summer blockbuster film.  Ennio Morricone stopped working with Bruno Nicolai, marking the end of Morricone's great period.  
    • When discussing Creed Taylor, don't forget his early work at ABC/Paramount, in particular with the great and underrated Kenyon Hopkins.  These albums were released under Creed Taylor's name for contractual reasons. They include The Sound of New York; 3Lonelyville; and the trilogy of Shock, Panic, and Nightmare.

    Then obviously like an idiot I forgot the huge omission of the release of Deodato because that record really set in motion EVERYTHING that set them forward after in terms of big plans.  I need to check out those Kenyon Hopkins albums! I was unaware. Thank you.

  8. 1 hour ago, Teasing the Korean said:

    Thanks for sharing.  I never heard of this guy.  I need to check him out. 

    He has a killer solo on Stanley Clarke's title track "East River Drive" which is quite anthemic. The  album is a mix of R&B, film music and jazz funk. It was given to me after the fire by the brilliant professor Dr. Bill Banfield. I'll probably replace the copy he gave me which is in poor condition but plays perfectly in my Audiolab transport. 

    6 hours ago, Teasing the Korean said:

    Thanks for posting.

    A couple of thoughts:

    • I completely agree with your opinion of CTI between 1970 and 1974, although I am not fond of Bob James.  But any of these albums from that period with either Deodato or Don Sebesky contributions are very worthwhile.  I associate the 1974 cutoff date with the arrival of disco in late 1974, not that I'm knocking disco, but that early-70s introspective, urban, minor-key, black-consciousness aesthetic was largely traded in for a forget-your-troubles-and-shake-your-booty ethos.
    • The cultural shifts at around 1974/75 are fascinating.  Disco arrived in a big way.  Jaws created a new paradigm for the summer blockbuster film.  Ennio Morricone stopped working with Bruno Nicolai, marking the end of Morricone's great period.  
    • When discussing Creed Taylor, don't forget his early work at ABC/Paramount, in particular with the great and underrated Kenyon Hopkins.  These albums were released under Creed Taylor's name for contractual reasons. They include The Sound of New York; 3Lonelyville; and the trilogy of Shock, Panic, and Nightmare.

    Then obviously like an idiot I forgot the huge omission of the release of Deodato because that record really set in motion EVERYTHING that set them forward after in terms of big plans.  I need to check out those Kenyon Martin albums! I was unaware. Thank you.

    1 hour ago, Teasing the Korean said:

    Thanks for sharing.  I never heard of this guy.  I need to check him out. 

    Oh yeah he definitely was the next big post Grover guy and he could play.

  9. 3 hours ago, JSngry said:

    Two words are missing here - George Howard.

    True. I couldn't fit in everything! I was like damn I need to include George Howard. Another edit. Dancing In The Sun was a huge early seller in GRP history and I had ended up with two copies of this once. I didn't like the album at all but hey, he was a huge name in the field and if we talk authenticity he was all about that.

    3 hours ago, Teasing the Korean said:

    Thanks for posting.

    A couple of thoughts:

    • I completely agree with your opinion of CTI between 1970 and 1974, although I am not fond of Bob James.  But any of these albums from that period with either Deodato or Don Sebesky contributions are very worthwhile.  I associate the 1974 cutoff date with the arrival of disco in late 1974, not that I'm knocking disco, but that early-70s introspective, urban, minor-key, black-consciousness aesthetic was largely traded in for a forget-your-troubles-and-shake-your-booty ethos.
    • The cultural shifts at around 1974/75 are fascinating.  Disco arrived in a big way.  Jaws created a new paradigm for the summer blockbuster film.  Ennio Morricone stopped working with Bruno Nicolai, marking the end of Morricone's great period.  
    • When discussing Creed Taylor, don't forget his early work at ABC/Paramount, in particular with the great and underrated Kenyon Hopkins.  These albums were released under Creed Taylor's name for contractual reasons. They include The Sound of New York; 3Lonelyville; and the trilogy of Shock, Panic, and Nightmare.

    Then obviously like an idiot I forgot the huge omission of the release of Deodato because that record really set in motion EVERYTHING that set them forward after in terms of big plans.  I need to check out those Kenyon Martin albums! I was unaware. Thank you.

  10. 3 minutes ago, Rabshakeh said:

    Thanks for this interesting article.

    I actually enjoy a lot of this music. Those Grover Washington, David Sanford, Hank Crawford and George Benson records are great (presumably not a contraversial perspective around here). But even a lot of the records from the "bad" era of smooth jazz generally have a good single or two (albeit they are maybe better seen as Quiet Storm / R&B records designed for smooching or root canals, rather than jazz).

    Two comments on areas that I think the articles don't pay attention to, which could also be included:

    (1) The quiet storm / smooth jazz intersection - the article touches on Sade and Kirk Whalum, but I think that this 'section' of the smooth jazz genre: instrumental urban contemporary pop, is the most interesting. A lot of modern gospel music also draws very heavily on this sort of smooth jazz. I think that in ten years when the taint of Mr Gorelick has finally worn off, some enterprising Gilles Peterson type DJ is going to make his or her name by "discovering" this stuff. It will be the new "rare groove" or "yacht rock".

    (2) What about the New Age music of the late 1970s? Surely artists like Shadowfax and George Winston are also part of the development and maturation of the smooth jazz genre?

    Interesting points. That can definitely be a followup article or even an edit when I have time. I agree with you that there is good music in the genre as I stated, I just think after 1984 a lot of it is devoid of substance. I mean Harlequin is a genre classic I just think after the first two tracks it settles into that signature GRP thing. The first two cuts are great MPB.  Kirk Whalum definitely took things to another level with his Gospel According To series and while that is not my preferred religion that is music full of meaning, passion and a neat injection of the Texas tenor thing with gospel music. 

  11. On 7/18/2022 at 4:33 PM, Eric said:

    Agree, this is a very nice one.

    I gotta stream that and his latest. Joel Ross is a beast

    On 7/18/2022 at 0:21 AM, Eric said:

    Interesting- seems more 1982 than anything.  Not super-impressed with those either.  How about something with photos of the artists?  Sincerely, Grumpy Old Man

    Haha. Well retro is in for millennials, my generation though I was born in 1981 but I agree a lot of recent Blue Note covers are nondescript but at the same time, I think we have to move on since the Reid Miles era... that said, the last iconic Blue Note cover of the last 40 years for me is One Night With Blue Note Preserved 

    On 7/17/2022 at 6:20 AM, Eric said:

    Too bad the album cover is completely unimaginative.  

    I kind of like it but his daughter designed it apparently. I guess for recent BN covers Melissa Aldana's and Gerald Clayton's are more interesting

  12. 9 hours ago, Eric said:

    Interesting- seems more 1982 than anything.  Not super-impressed with those either.  How about something with photos of the artists?  Sincerely, Grumpy Old Man

    Haha. Well retro is in for millennials, my generation though I was born in 1981 but I agree a lot of recent Blue Note covers are nondescript but at the same time, I think we have to move on since the Reid Miles era... that said, the last iconic Blue Note cover of the last 40 years for me is One Night With Blue Note Preserved 

    On 7/17/2022 at 6:20 AM, Eric said:

    Too bad the album cover is completely unimaginative.  

    I kind of like it but his daughter designed it apparently. I guess for recent BN covers Melissa Aldana's and Gerald Clayton's are more interesting

  13. 13 hours ago, Eric said:

    Too bad the album cover is completely unimaginative.  

    I kind of like it but his daughter designed it apparently. I guess for recent BN covers Melissa Aldana's and Gerald Clayton's are more interesting

  14. Has anyone heard it? It's pretty good, I'm streaming until I can get the CD.  Probably will review, but it's the best Blue Note I've heard from him besides Live At Montreux because there's no commercial pretense here, it's just Ronnie being Ronnie without the need to cater to capitalistic concerns like his 70's stuff.  I think for many, YMMV, and may not to be to taste like the last two Dr. Lonnie albums on BN but I enjoyed this one.

  15. I'm  not buying this... I already have Hub Tones, Hubcap, The Artistry of Freddie Hubbard and The Body And Soul  on AP SACD and Open Sesame on Audiowave XRCD in my rebuilt collection.  I used to have Ready For Freddie as a Connoisseur since I was 14, Breaking Point, Blue Spirits and Night Of the Cookers as RVG's, the only one I never owned was Goin Up which was OOP.  Casual fans won't buy this so what's the aim? Is it Mosaic's way as they can do material from Universal, a way to counter cheap PD sets which do not have the sound, or documentation? I love Mosaic but sorry to say the Joe Henderson was probably the last set I'll ever buy from them.

  16. 5 hours ago, Dub Modal said:

    Great read.

    Streaming platforms give BN the ability to tie in legacy albums and artists to new ones and I think that’s why sublabels don’t and/or won’t exist. Their monthly playlists do just this, as do their (and Impluse as well) artist-selected playlists. Was seems to be taking a big tent approach and while I haven’t looked at BNs bottom line among other Universal products, it’s probably doing decent enough. 

    Thanks for reading! And as said above, four new Blue Note releases I will stream before purchase are Chapel, Reboot, and The Spirit of Ntu.  I also need to hear the first Julian Lage on the label before his new one.

  17. 2 hours ago, danasgoodstuff said:

    Thanks for being willing to put yourself out there and posting your article.

    My pleasure. I almost want to send it to my contact Cem Kurosman there but to keep in the good graces of their promo list I probably shouldn't. 

    2 hours ago, danasgoodstuff said:

    Thanks for being willing to put yourself out there and posting your article.

     

  18. 5 hours ago, danasgoodstuff said:

    listening to Melissa A's 12 Stars as I type, I think Blue Note is doing about as well and is as Blue Notey as any time since the revival in the '80s and better than it was in the mid to late '70s.  In particular, they have fine young talent like Joel Ross, Immanual Wilens, and Johnathon Blake, and better yet they play on each other's records just like the old days.  As for possibly relegating non-'jazz' artists like Rosanne Cash or Al Green or Van Morrison or.... to a subsidiary label, I agree with Charlie Parker, 'there's no dividing line to art'.  I was happy to see DOMi & JD Beck signed, and Trombone Shorty, and most of the current roster as well.

    I like that balanced viewpoint actually. I will purchase  Makhathini's new one and have to check out the new Joel Ross. It is true like the old days they do play on each others records. I like what I heard from DOMi and JD Beck so far. I love Derrick Hodge as a player, and composer at times, "Over There" on Blanchard's Flow is great, but though I was kind in my review his last one didn't really stick with me after review  

  19. 1 hour ago, Teasing the Korean said:

    Thanks for the read.  You open by saying that change is inevitable, and that Blue Note is nothing more than a brand now, both of which I agree with.  

    Your central question then seems to be: "My concern is less savvy new fans, unlike veterans like myself will be lead to thinking it’s emblematic of what mssrs. Lion and Wolff brought us."

    I would think that someone who buys a Roseanne Cash album on Blue Note will either (a) not be familiar with Blue Note; (b) not particularly care that it is on Blue Note; or (c) understand that Blue Note, as you wrote, is nothing nothing more than a corporate imprint.  Some people in the middle may legitimately wonder if Cash is trying to do a pseudo-jazz album.  In the era of YouTube and audio samples, they can answer that question within minutes if not seconds.  

    Maybe the best thing would have been to put the brand to bed decades ago, and use it only for reissues, but even then, there would be disagreement about the cutoff date, based on all the Mizell-era albums I used to find in the dollar bin.  

    My biggest issue with Blue Note is their compilation albums. These will often include recordings that were on Blue Note, Capitol, Liberty, World Pacific, Roulette, and probably others that I am forgetting, and may throw in a couple of more recent tracks that stick out like a sore thumb.  Talk about weakening the brand.

    The new Melissa Aldana is nice, as is the singles from the new Ronnie Foster, the first Gerald Clayton, Happenings was great as was Nduduzo Makathini (though the sound sucked) I look forward to streaming Clayton's new one.  I have to check out Immanuel Wilkins 7th Hand and see if I want to review.  So hard to keep up streaming new music. I got the files from them from the Ornette box and they sound terrific. Why not do a set like the Complete Morgan Lighthouse set there on CD so fans like myself who never owned the initial CD's could own them? Did the Lee set on CD do bad numbers? I love that set

    They are shitting the bed with the new Charles Lloyd by releasing the three separate CD's but LP is getting a nice box set. It sucks because Lloyds 8 Souls I never investigated on CD or streaming because the complete concert was only available on LP. The Tone Poet masterings I dont understand why they can't be available streaming, AT LEAST when say inferior masterings like some RVG'S are still physically available. Perhaps the brand should have gone under after Lundvall was replaced by Don Was

×
×
  • Create New...