Jim Alfredson

Admin
  • Content count

    12,649
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by Jim Alfredson


  1. Best quote:

     

    What are your feelings on digital versus analog?

     
    The linear storage of digital information is idealized. It can be perfect. It can never be perfect in analog because you cannot repro­duce the varying voltages through the dif­ferent translations from one medium to an­other. You go from sound to a microphone to a stylus cutting a groove. Then you have to play that back from another stylus wig­gling in a groove, and then translate it back to voltage.

     
    The biggest distorter is the LP it­self. I've made thousands of LP masters. I used to make 17 a day, with two lathes go­ing simultaneously, and I'm glad to see the LP go. As far as I'm concerned, good rid­dance. It was a constant battle to try to make that music sound the way it should. It was never any good. And if people don't like what they hear in digital, they should blame the engineer who did it. Blame the mastering house. Blame the mixing engi­neer. That's why some digital recordings sound terrible, and I'm not denying that they do, but don't blame the medium.

     
    A lot of people argue that digital is a cold­er, sterile sound. Where do you think that comes from?

     
    Where does it come from? The engineers. You've noticed they've attributed the sound to the medium. They say digital is cold, so they've given it an attribute, but linear digi­tal has no attributes. It's just a medium for storage. It's what you do with it. A lot of this has to do with the writing in consumer magazines. They've got to talk about some­thing.

     

    http://jazzprofiles.blogspot.com/2011/05/rudy-van-gelder-signature-sound.html


  2. The forum used to have a special "trash forum" where deleted posts and threads would go, but the software developers took that out. I asked if there was any way it could be re-implemented and they said no.

    The thing to do for the time being is to let me know AS SOON AS IT HAPPENS and I can have the database restored from a backup. We may lose a few posts, but that's better than an entire thread. After two days, it is too late.


  3. On 5/18/2016 at 1:43 PM, fasstrack said:

    It's doing weird things. Takes forever to load, for one. Then it leaves out part of the text and links of the post being quoted. Is this just me?

    Yep.


  4. I use 808 000 000. Some folks like to put a bit of the second drawbar in there, like 828 000 000.

    To change how patches affect the lower manual when you select a new preset, go to the PATCH submenu and turn OFF the L/P parameter (Lower Preset). This is a global setting so once you change it, it stays that way... no saving required. For more information on what loads with each patch/preset, check out the PATCH LOAD section in the SK user manual, page 76.


  5. Resonance Records strikes again.

    http://www.sunnykilogram.com/projects/dd/bill-evans/email.html

    album-cover.jpg

    " DELUXE 2-CD SET AND DIGITAL EDITION AVAILABLE APRIL 22, 2016

    SPECIAL LIMITED EDITION HAND-NUMBERED 2-LP SET MASTERED BY BERNIE GRUNDMAN AND PRESSED ON 180-GRAM VINYL BY RECORD TECHNOLOGY, INC. AVAILABLE SATURDAY APRIL 16, 2016 FOR RECORD STORE DAY

    NEVER-BEFORE-RELEASED 1968 STUDIO ALBUM BY LEGENDARY PIANIST BILL EVANS IN TRIO, DUO AND SOLO SETTINGS WITH JAZZ GREATS EDDIE GOMEZ AND JACK DEJOHNETTE

    RECORDED BY HANS GEORG BRUNNER-SCHWER AND JOACHIM-ERNST BERENDT AT MPS STUDIOS, VILLINGEN, GERMANY IN THE BLACK FOREST


    Unique studio recording made on June 20, 1968, five days after the Bill Evans Trio’s triumphant performance at the Montreux Jazz Festival

    Only the second album — and the only studio album — to feature the Bill Evans Trio with brilliant drummer, Jack DeJohnette, and great bassist and Evans Trio veteran, Eddie Gomez
     ."


  6. Finally listening to this. I need to go to bed soon but I wanted to at least listen to the first couple of tunes. The chord structure on "Trane of Thought" reminds me of "Beyond All Limits" off Unity. The sound is quite good although the organ is (as expected) a bit too far in the background. So far there is a lot of inspired playing on this, though. Shaw is exceptional. Nathan Davis sounds great, too. I admit I'd never heard him before.

    It's interesting to know that the song "Zoltan" was named after the composer Zoltán Kodály (another name I was unfamiliar with). The liner notes are a treat. 


  7. It's like 10.5 ¢ per tune per disc if it's under 7 minutes, I think. Over that, you have to pay another 2 ¢  per minute (which is stupid, especially on a jazz record where you only play the actual melody (the part that is copyrighted) for maybe 30 seconds).

    Anyway, for a 10 song CD, it will average to around $1.10  per disc.


  8. 3 hours ago, jeffcrom said:

    But in many cases, the only CD (or LP) versions of older music available are those that sacrifice frequencies to eliminate surface noise.

    Digital techniques have gotten better for noise removal but I tend to think we should leave well enough alone and just release needle drops of older material like that.


  9. Unorthodox Behavior I think is the most glaring of them; but actually putting it in Wavelab and looking at the spectrum, it's everything below about 200Hz that could use a slight boost (maybe 2db). I did that using the Eiosis Air EQ plug-in and everything sounded much mire full and present to me. It's not bad as is and the dynamic range is fantastic; almost unheard of for a modern remaster.


  10. Yes, the definition of a lossless compression scheme means that no data is lost once the data is decoded. So a FLAC file is exactly the same as whatever file it was made from, just smaller. So no, there is no compression left after the decoding.

    Don't confuse data compression with dynamic (audio) compression. They are two very different things.


  11. 8 hours ago, crisp said:

    Oh and I am quite aware that FLAC files are compressed. They are nowhere near as compressed as MP3s, though.

    The difference is the kind of data compression. FLAC uses a lossless data compression which means that upon decoding no information is lost; you have an exact digital copy of the original file. If you've ever downloaded and extracted a ZIP file from the web, it is the same concept.

    MP3 data compression is lossy, meaning it throws away parts of the data is deems unnecessary. It uses psychoacoustic theory to determine that. If you encoded an executable file (a program) with a lossy data compression scheme, like MP3, and tried to run it once decoded, it wouldn't run because it would be missing actual data.