medjuck

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Posts posted by medjuck


  1. 56 minutes ago, soulpope said:

    10 favourite album covers in BLUE (partially with BLUE in the title but no Blue Note platters :D) :

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    Elton John „Blue Moves“ (The Rocket Company) 1976 .... cover art by Patrick Proctor ....

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    Don Rendell Ian Carr Quintet "ShadesOf Blue" (Columbia)        1965 ....

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    Sparks „The Number One Song In Heaven“ (Virgin) 1979 ....

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    Peter Gabriel „Peter Gabriel“ (ATCO/Charisma) 1977 ....

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    Fritz Pauer Trio „Blues Inside Out“ (MPS) 1979 ....

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    Zenker Brothers „Immersion“ (Ilian) 2015 ....

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    Ben Lukas Boysen „Gravity“ (Ad Noiseam) 2013 ....

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    Otis Redding „Otis Blue“ (Atlantic/Volt) 1965 ....

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    Elvis Costello "Almost Blue" (F-Beat)        1981 ....

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    Terje Rypdal „Descendre“ (ECM) 1980 .... and the inevitbale ECM cover art as closer ....

    Where's Joni Mitchell?


  2. 1 hour ago, Larry Kart said:

    Also, one 1957 track with them from "The Sound of Jazz." On YouTube.

     

    Yes, They're on both the supposed rehearsal record (I always thought it was a CBS tie-in recording session) and the tv show. 

     

    1 hour ago, paul secor said:

    If you're into bootlegs, semi-bootlegs, or whatever you want to call them, the tracks are available here: https://www.amazon.com/Modern-Quartet-Giuffre-Complete-Recordings/dp/B000BYAD16

     

    61Kff-wkcIL.jpg

    So is he on the legitimate MJQ with Giuffre cd? It appears not on the Discogs credits. 


  3. I just read the following in an on-line essay about The Sound of Jazz: "  In 1956, he recorded a blues with Giuffre at Music Inn, ." (The "he" being Pee Wee Russell.) Is this correct?  I can find no reference to a  recording of Giuffre at Music Inn except the record with  the MJQ. 


  4. 2 hours ago, sgcim said:

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NgpHC1FGpc&feature=youtu.be

    I finally convinced the pianist to check out some of the great tunes that Raksin wrote in some of the films he scored. This one isn't as well known as "Laura", but is more sophisticated melodically, harmonically and rhythmically.

    A casual listener might think it's a cocktail piano tune, but a more attentive listener might appreciate the unorthodox contour of the melody, the irregular harmonic rhythm, and the skillful use of counterpoint. In Raksin's autobiography (available only in electronic form), he relates the time he played it for Andre Previn, before it was scored for the film. Previn reacted very negatively to it, saying something like, "What the hell is that? You're not going to use that for the film, are you?"

    When the film came out, Previn heard the melody again, and fell in love with it. Raksin told him it was the same tune he played for him that day in his house. It's been recorded by a number of people, Charlie Haden, Barry Galbraith, Jimmy Cleveland, Bill Evans, and others, but it's never really caught on as a 'standard'. It was sung by Mark Murphy and Finestein, but I'd rather not think about that now...:alien:

    Hopefully, can get it together enough to make an album of Raksin's tunes(instead of the same old standards our fearless leader insists on playing) I've transcribed from the films, and some other rarities by film composers like Goldsmith and Williams, but it's his Yamaha Grand and recording equipment, so we're pretty much at his mercy.:rolleyes:

     

    Sorry, I'm confused. (I'm often confused.)  Are you talking about The Bad and the Beautiful here? 


  5. I moved to Toronto in June of 1965 and presumed that your Saturday morning show as well established.  Didn't realize that you had just  begun.  Listened to you till I left in June of 1980. 


  6. 14 hours ago, catesta said:

    No need to call you, just turn the channel. You can see the "indignation" of those other folks you mention every day and night on pretty much every other broadcast.

    The story here is just about people that have the means to put their kids into any of the schools involved but apparently the kids did not have the grades and the parents the patience to do so. Their actions may have actually made it even harder for average people to send their kids to college. That should be what angers you, not what they are saying at Fox.

    Calls for cuts in federal financial aid have been just that as funding for education has and continues to go up. in 2018 Trump's proposed budget was $59 billion +/- but he signed spending $70 billion. In 2019 it is $81 billion.

     

    14 hours ago, catesta said:

    No need to call you, just turn the channel. You can see the "indignation" of those other folks you mention every day and night on pretty much every other broadcast.

    The story here is just about people that have the means to put their kids into any of the schools involved but apparently the kids did not have the grades and the parents the patience to do so. Their actions may have actually made it even harder for average people to send their kids to college. That should be what angers you, not what they are saying at Fox.

    Calls for cuts in federal financial aid have been just that as funding for education has and continues to go up. in 2018 Trump's proposed budget was $59 billion +/- but he signed spending $70 billion. In 2019 it is $81 billion.

     

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  7. 11 hours ago, miles65 said:

    I hope for the fans that all these sets mentioned in earlier in this tread come to be some day. But as a vintage man I have other wishes. My 2 cents worth. These I one time or another suggested to Mosaic

    1. Victor and Columbia 1897-1917(?) Ragtime recordings. This would save a whole genre of music.

    2. Paul Whiteman Victor and Columbia Jazz(orientated) recordings 1920-1937. He was not the King of Jazz but had Bix, Tram and later Jack Teagarden (and many more) in his ranks.

    3. Duke Ellington 1924-1930 Sony owned recordings. Years ago I posted about this. This would amount to 4 CD’s. If Steven Laster would do this set he will have done most of Duke’s recordings 1924-1946. And if Universal would cooperate and add the two later found takes to the existing 3 Cd Brunswick/Vocalion set it would truly be wonderful.

    4. Duke Ellington Columbia 1947-1952. There is still a lot of unissued material from this period.

    5. Duke Ellington Columbia 1956-1962. Here also there is still a lot unissued material and tracks that are only available on vinyl. This would have to be spread on several boxes.

    6. Fletcher Henderson. A set on this important big band pioneer is long overdue.

    7. Henry “Red” Allen/J.C. Higginbotham 1929-1946 Sony sessions. They played together a lot but there are a few sessions worth of inclusion where only one of them played. Apart from leader sessions there would also be tracks from Fletcher Henderson, Mills Blue Rhythm Band and Luis Russell.

    8. A combined set with Jimmie Lunceford and Chick Webb Victor and Columbia sessions. If there is space left maybe Charlie Johnson too.

    9. Clarence Williams/ Eva Taylor 1921-1942 Okeh/Columbia/Vocalion recordings. This would have to be a split in at least two sets.

    10. Last but not least Louis Armstrong Okeh, Columbia and Victor 1925-1933 sessions. Off course this material is not difficult to obtain. Most of it anyway. But at the moment these recordings are not available in away that is legal everywhere. Including only the leader sessions it would amount  to 8 CD’s. But in this period Armstrong was also a side man in 9 vocalist sessions (21 tracks). This would mean an extra CD. But on the one hand I would not like the vocalist sessions intertwined with the leader sessions but on the other hand I would not like to miss Hociel Thomas’ ‘Sunshine Baby’ Just listen to Armstrong and Dodds play as if their lives depend on in. If Universal would cooperate and allow a CD with the Erskine Tate, Lil Armstrong, Johnny Dodds, Jimmy Bertrant and the Louis Armstrong 1934 Paris sessions to be included than together with the 1935-1946 Decca set we would have 21 consecutive years of Armstrong studio recordings complete.

    When there were still selects I suggested a set with Victor sessions that were not included in the Bix and Lang/Venuti sets.

    Wish that came true: Teddy Wilson’s Sony recordings without Billie.

    And an Armstrong set with the 50’s Columbia recordings is in the make

    New wishes are:

    The Gerry Mulligan Sextet LP set on CD;

    Benny Goodman Orchestra on Victor 1935-1939;

    Benny Goodman Victor and Columbia small group sessions 1935-1946;

    More (Ellington and Goodman) from the Savory collection;

    Savoy and Commodore swing combo’s.

     

    I'd go for almost all of these but I doubt if they'd sell very well.  BTW When you say the Victor "Bix and Lang/Venuti" sets is that mainly Whitman? 


  8. 33 minutes ago, Milestones said:

    Is he the most-recorded drummer ever?  I'e heard it's about 6,000 recordings.  I imagine some jazz guys would at least give him a run for money.

    Billy Higgins?  I think I read that Earl Palmer played on even more records. 


  9. Screen-Shot-2019-03-13-at-4-17-33-PM.png

    MacDonald's last book.   I read it because it's the one where it is most obvious that Santa Teresa is Santa Barbara.  Good story but as far as I can see two murders in it are never actually solved. And I think that the epithet for every Lew Archer story should be Faulkner's "The past isn't dead. It isn't even past."  


  10. 6 hours ago, sgcim said:
     He started out as a jazz drummer, and even went on the road with Basie. When he came to LA, Shelly Manne was the top studio drummer, and Shelly turned down all the rock dates he was called for, because he thought they were beneath him, and gave them to Hal. 
    Next thing you know, Hal played on every hit record of that time. 

    In the 80's, drum machines took over the studio scene, and HB wasn't as busy as he used to be. His sixth wife took everything he had in a bitter divorce, and HB would've been broke if not for his Union pension. 
    RIP. 
     
     
     

    He also gives  credit to Earl Palmer who had so too many  studio gigs and  he recommended Blaine for the ones he couldn't make.  Palmer may have played on even more records than Blaine:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_Palmer


  11. IIRC (and I may not) in the documentary about the wrecking crew both Blaine and Carole Kaye say they started out wanting to be jazz musicians but couldn't make a living at it. 


  12. 6 hours ago, mjzee said:

     

    At the Mosaic open house, I told Cuscuna and Scott about the Grateful Dead's current release model: when they prepare a box set for release, they solicit pre-orders and require payment upon order, so they have the money all up front.  They basically pay all costs for producing the box set out of the pre-order money, requiring no out-of-pocket spending.  It's brilliant, as long as your audience is willing to co-operate.

     

    That's sort of the Tesla model.  (Though they only ask for a deposit.) 


  13. 16 minutes ago, Chuck Nessa said:

    For a long time I have been hoping for an expanded version of "the Okeh Ellington" including all the titles and takes from Pathe, Columbia, Okeh, Harmony, Cameo, Banner and Perfect. 

    I mentioned this to Scott a while back and he said it was "on the list".

    Not holding my breath.

    You'd think one of the Euro labels would have filled the gaps by now, but.......................

    Me too. Though I've gradually begun to find those missing tracks, at my age I'm worried death will find me before I find the rest of them.   BTW Aren't there also a couple of tracks from a label called "Hits of the Week" or something like that?-- I'm travelling and away from my cds and reference books.  I think at least some of those tracks are on the Naxos Duke series. 


  14. I remember when people used to ask it you dreamed in black and white or colour.  Maybe because I was studying with McLuhan at the time, I'd always point out that nobody asked that question before the invention of photography.