Teasing the Korean

Suggest Me Some Brazil

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Well, Jim R already knows this (I think), but I'm not big on the Morelenbaum-Sakamoto collaborations. It's not that I dislike anyone involved - far from it! - but somehow, all of the studio albums strike me as lacking something that's very much there on discs like the one by Quarteto Jobim-Morelenbaum. They're almost too laid back and dispassionate for my taste; the only cut on the NYC disc that really hits me is a tango, of all things. (Not that I'm opposed to the form by any means ;), but it's a fairly dark, angst-y piece in comparison with the rest of the cuts.)

I'll even go so far as to say that I think the way the Q. J-M disc was recorded suits Paula's voice *much* better - there's a far warmer sound, and the vocal harmonies created for that disc are a big plus for me. (I think Paula literally sounds better when she's got a lower voice to play off of, in both lead lines and parts.)

Could it be that the Morelenbaum-Sakamoto discs were made (i think) for a non-Brazilian public, while the Jobim-Morelenbaum disc was targeted at Brazil 1st, then other markets? I wonder... I know at least one other person who was touring here (coming from Brazil) at the same time in 2002 who felt that the Morelenbaums and Sakamoto were getting the lion's share of press coverage, which is (as far as I'm aware) pretty on-target. It was unfortunate, in the sense that the other artists in question have a tremendous amount to offer and would (I think) have gotten better attendance at their gigs if the tours hadn't coincided. (Which had something to do with the randomness of travel visa denials at that time - a lot of artists got left out in the cold by the strictures that were put in place after 9/11, including a number of Brazilians - for no seeming reason.)

You make some interesting observations, Ellen. I've never really tried comparing M2/S with Q. J-M directly, but I can understand what you're saying. For me, I simply love both. I think there's definitely something of a darker, more melancholy atmosphere (perhaps more sentimentality) on some of the M2/S recordings, which I never found to be a negative thing... I just associate it with the fact that Jobim had passed away within the fairly recent past when the group was organized. As I'm sure you know, Ryuichi was even using Tom's piano on "Casa", and mentioned in one interview that he was very moved to have that opportunity. He also mentioned that one of their goals was to make more people aware of the scope of Jobim's compositional ability, to get beyond the stereotypes of his popular bossa hits, and show more of his classical side. This might account for some of the more laid back vibe of much of the group's work (and again, I suspect you know that... I just thought I'd spell some of that out for other who might be reading this). At any rate, you may also be right about the marketing and presentation differences between M2/S and Q. J-M. I hadn't thought about that either, probably because I'm so attracted to both. To each their own, as they say. :)

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You know, I think the way in which the Q J-M disc was recorded and mastered is a lot more appealing to me - it has (for lack of a better term) a warmer sound, and I think the fact that everyone on there had known and worked with each other for so long is one of the things that makes it a real standout. And I do love the charts, no question.

I'd need to go back and re-listen to my copies of Casa and A Day in NY to be able to comment with any real insight, though - it's been a good while since I last heard both. OTOH, the Q J-M disc is one of my all-time faves. (Not that I keep a list or anything... :))

My guess is that with Casa, I was anticipating something along the lines of Q J-M Vol. 2, and it's got a very different sound and feel. I don't mind the moodiness at all; but if anything, it struck me (back when it 1st came out) as almost *too* reverent.

Like I said, I need to replay both discs! I wish I had a copy of their live disc; that's probably the one for me, out of all of them.

Edited to add: The Q J-M disc has a lot of swing (balanço). And some of Jobim's "nordestino" compositions are on there (i.e., influenced by music from the northeast of Brazil). Those are big pluses for me! :)

Edited by seeline

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Jim, Bev (and all) - this is my candidate for one of the best all-Jobim discs - David Ganc & Quarteto Guerra-Peixe Interpretam Tom Jobim

davidgancequartetoguerrapeixeinterpretamtomjobim.jpg

David has several full tracks available for listening on his site: http://davidganc.com/en/discografia/carreira

Tracks:

1. Garoto

2. Sue Ann

3. Água de Beber

4. Estrada do Sol

5. Meu Amigo Radamés

6. Mojave

7. Modinha

8. Só Danço Samba

9. Rancho nas Nuvens

10. Você e Eu

Edited to add: Casa has improved with age! (Or my ears have adjusted to it, or maybe both. :)) If anything, some of the charts remind me of Jobim's instrumental interpretations of the pieces. Still, I think it could have a tad more bite, a bit more Rio samba feel. But that's a taste thing entirely.

Edited by seeline

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Love Casa, A Day in New York, etc. Amazing stuff. I view it as classical music when I listen sometimes. There's such delicacy and subtlety at play.

I really love Paula's most recent albums, I know many don't, but I think they're a marvelous fusion of the old and the new, which I don't see as a bad thing, and Jacques plays some incredible cello solos on these!

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You might like the David Ganc album I mentioned above. Quarteto Guerra-Peixe's cellist (Ricardo Santoro) is wonderful. And David is an incredible multi-reed player. He's fluent in English... I wish he was better known here, but he's chosen to work mainly in Brazil.

Edited by seeline

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Thanks for the tips. :) Will be keeping my eyes and ears open.

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Unfortunately, David's Jobim album is on a label (Kuarup Discos) that recently went bankrupt, but you might be able to get a good used copy...

Am listening to A Day in NY now. This is my pick of the two - makes you feel like you're in the room with all of the musicians. My only real beef is with the way Ryuichi ended "Samba do Avião." It's perfect otherwise! One really great thing (IMO) is Luiz Brasil's guitar work. And - as is mentioned in the liners - this is the working group that toured. I think that shows, in the charts, interpretations and overall feel - very tight!

Edited to add: OK, now I want the live CD. Yikes! (Because of the cost.)

Thanks, Jim, Lon, Harold, Bev, and all for making me give these CDs another hearing. It's been a nice evening of listening for certain! :)

Edited by seeline

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Love Casa, A Day in New York, etc. Amazing stuff. I view it as classical music when I listen sometimes. There's such delicacy and subtlety at play.

I really love Paula's most recent albums, I know many don't, but I think they're a marvelous fusion of the old and the new, which I don't see as a bad thing, and Jacques plays some incredible cello solos on these!

Yes! Lon - You already know I love these records and really it was you who introduced me to Paula via Berimbaum. I love that album, all of the above mentioned Paula and the newest album Telecoteco.

Berimbaum really caught my attention and I started to delve into Brazilian music with the help of Loronix and also a close friend who hipped me to Baden Powell and Vinicius, etc. Of course I was aware of Jobim but not to the extent I am now. I didn't realize the full scope of his genius.

I'm not sure what it is that some of you guys don't like about those last two Paula albums - it might make for some interesting conversation for those who don't like those to state their case. Friendly discussion on fine points of music and listening, etc.

Jim, Bev (and all) - this is my candidate for one of the best all-Jobim discs - David Ganc & Quarteto Guerra-Peixe Interpretam Tom Jobim

davidgancequartetoguerrapeixeinterpretamtomjobim.jpg

The samples sure sound good. I have to hunt this down.

Edited by Harold_Z

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You'll probably need to check for a used copy. (The label it came out on went bankrupt earlier this year, unfortunately.)

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You'll probably need to check for a used copy. (The label it came out on went bankrupt earlier this year, unfortunately.)

I just grabbed a new copy on Amazon. $29.00. I hate to pay that much but from the samples this really sounds like a different approach. I think I'm going to like it.

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I'd also recommend his album Caldo-de-Cana (another Kuarup Discos release).

caldodecana.jpg

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Jim, Bev (and all) - this is my candidate for one of the best all-Jobim discs - David Ganc & Quarteto Guerra-Peixe Interpretam Tom Jobim

Fabulous record - Seeline recommended it to me a couple of years back over on the AAJ Brazil thread. I also like this one:

Caldo-de-Cana-thumb.jpg

The one I'd like to find, but appears to be missing in action, is this:

mariosevedavidganc.jpg

Edit: (Sorry, Seeline! Crossed post!)

Edited by Bev Stapleton

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Not to hijack my own thread but:

Last night - as often happens to me on Friday nights - I found myself awake way past my bedtime, having drunk too much red wine, and scouring Youtube for interesting music.

I came across this ten minute clip from a film I'd never heard of before, featuring segments of VINICIUS, BADEN POWELL and QUARTETO EM CY PERFORMING SONGS FROM OS AFRO SAMBAS:

BTW, I have a room that filled with LPs and CDs, God knows how many I have, but if I can take only one album with me to the afterlife, I will not hesitate to choose "Os Afro Sambas," the original 1966 version at least.

YOU HAVE TO WATCH THIS CLIP IF YOU HAVE NOT SEEN IT ALREADY.

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Thanks for the clip, great! I love that record "Os Afro Sambas" too. A classic.

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Two great Brazilian musical dolphins

SubPageDolphin.jpg

Some years ago I became smitten by the Luiz Eca tune 'The Dolphin', hearing it first on a Stan Tracey CD and then later done by Louis Stewart, Bill Evans and Stan Getz.

Today, whilst listening again to the Quarteto Jobim-Morelenbaum album I was completely transfixed by the tune 'O Boto'. Looking it up on Google it turns out to mean 'The Dolphin'.

So well done dolphins...you've inspired two fabulous tunes. I will check my tins of tuna with greater care in future to ensure you are not being harmed.

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The boto isn't the kind of dolphin that's found in the ocean. It's a freshwater river dolphin: http://www.acsonline.org/factpack/Boto.htm

There's a *lot* of folklore regarding the boto, which is believed to be able to change itself into human form. When the boto does this, he (it's always a man) comes to town, acts charming, drinks a lot, and seduces a girl or two. he then goes back to the river, abandoning his human form - and the women he leaves behind. (The women are usually pregnant by the boto.)

There are songs (and a movie) about women who've been deceived by the boto. The belief in the legend is quite strong, even today. (There's a song about the boto on Mônica Salmaso's 1st album, btw...)

Edited by seeline

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Interesting, Seeline.

In Scottish/Irish folklore there's a similar tale, but a woman is involved. She sheds her seal skin to come ashore in human form. What usually happens is a chap falls for her and hides the skin. She lives a human life but always seeks the skin, eventually finding it and returning to the waters.

The Selkie

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I was thinking of that while I was writing about the boto... funny how one is always in female form, while the other is always male. I think (would have to check to be sure) that the boto mythology/legends originated with Indians in the Amazon basin, so there's probably much more background (about various animals and possible shape-shifting abilities).

There are a lot of other fantastic creatures in Brazilian folklore. Unfortunately, all of the web sites that deal with these things in depth are in Portuguese only. Here's a good start, though (in English): http://www.maria-brazil.org/brazilian_myth...c_creatures.htm

The song on Mônica's 1st CD is "Tajapanema." It was written by Waldemar Henrique, whose song lyrics (and musical style) were very much influenced by the folktales, beliefs and "local" music of the Amazon region.

Edited by seeline

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Why haven't more of you commented on that AMAZING CLIP of VINICIUS and BADEN POWELL doing OS AFRO SAMBAS tunes? THIS IS THE GREATEST ALBUM EVER MADE!!!

You need to watch it, srsly, k thnx bai.

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TTK - That IS a terrific clip. Thanks for posting it.

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Not to hijack my own thread but:

I came across this ten minute clip from a film I'd never heard of before, featuring segments of VINICIUS, BADEN POWELL and QUARTETO EM CY PERFORMING SONGS FROM OS AFRO SAMBAS:

That's not (I think!) Quarteto em Cy - see the IMDB page for Pierre Kast's documentary on Vinicíus, Les Carnets Brésiliens. The footage on YouTube might have been ripped from a newer doc, Vinícius. (Haven't seen either, but I'd very much like copies of both.)

There are a *lot* of people in the 2nd part of that clip - I wonder if anyone has a complete list of names?

Edited to add: D'oh! I only just noticed the French TV watermark in the lower right-hand corner of the vid...

Edited by seeline

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That's not (I think!) Quarteto em Cy

I thought I recognized one of them, I could have been wrong.

Still, I'm pretty sure that Vinicius and Baden Powell are in the crowd someplace. ;)

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Oh, I think you're probably right about at least one of them being in that clip... but from your original post on this, I thought it was a stage or TV performance.

As for me, I really *do* wonder who all those kids are... or were.

Edited by seeline

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Why haven't more of you commented on that AMAZING CLIP of VINICIUS and BADEN POWELL doing OS AFRO SAMBAS tunes? THIS IS THE GREATEST ALBUM EVER MADE!!!

You need to watch it, srsly, k thnx bai.

Great clip, TTK. Very 60s...you can almost see the John Paul Sartres sticking out of the back pockets.

There's a very 70's TV music show clip of Vinicius doing Berimbau and half of the Canto de Ossanha (with Toquinho and Jobim [a bit further in]) here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AP0t2E6rqWA...feature=related

Not as dark and haunting as your clip. This is how I remember European music TV in the 70s...though the music was never as good.

That Os Afro Sambas album is a marvel - though I've only acquired the original in the last year or so. I very much like this later version and the interpretation on the second disc here:

OsAfroSambas-thumb.jpgafrosambas.jpg

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