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blind-blake

An interesting web site about Jasha Horenstein

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I've just begun to listen to Jascha Horenstein's music, so this is a godsend. Thanks for posting it.

Incidentally, Donald Clarke (musicbox) is a member here.

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I've just begun to listen to Jascha Horenstein's music, so this is a godsend. Thanks for posting it.

Incidentally, Donald Clarke (musicbox) is a member here.

I didnt' realize! Nice web site, Donald.

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Thenk yew, thenk yew, don't applaud, just throw money. :rolleyes:

The sad thing is that the supply of Horenstein airchecks is slowing up. I haven't been able to add anything for more than a year.

Edited by musicbox

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Thenk yew, thenk yew, don't applaud, just throw money. :rolleyes:

The sad thing is that the supply of Horenstein airchecks is slowing up. I haven't been able to add anything for more than a year.

That is too bad. Where did you get that 1930s poster from Palestine? That's an interesting item.

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I am disgracefully bad at remembering where I got stuff. I got that poster either from Joel Lazar, who was Horenstein's assistant during the last few years of his life, or from Mischa Horenstein, a nephew.

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I am disgracefully bad at remembering where I got stuff. I got that poster either from Joel Lazar, who was Horenstein's assistant during the last few years of his life, or from Mischa Horenstein, a nephew.

Interesting. Thanks for keeping the Horenstein flame burning. I'm listening to the Vox recording of Brahm's third right now. Just great.

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I am disgracefully bad at remembering where I got stuff. I got that poster either from Joel Lazar, who was Horenstein's assistant during the last few years of his life, or from Mischa Horenstein, a nephew.

Interesting. Thanks for keeping the Horenstein flame burning. I'm listening to the Vox recording of Brahm's third right now. Just great.

Horenstein's Nielsen Fifth and Mahler First (both on Nonesuch LP I think) were my fine introduction to those great works.

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I am disgracefully bad at remembering where I got stuff. I got that poster either from Joel Lazar, who was Horenstein's assistant during the last few years of his life, or from Mischa Horenstein, a nephew.

Interesting. Thanks for keeping the Horenstein flame burning. I'm listening to the Vox recording of Brahm's third right now. Just great.

Horenstein's Nielsen Fifth and Mahler First (both on Nonesuch LP I think) were my fine introduction to those great works.

Off topic, but I wanted to mention to you that I found the Voicu/Haas record you mentioned in another thread. You were right. Really great stuff. Thanks!

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Some folks might be interested in this story. Back in the late '60s I thought I had a chance to get some foundation money to make classical recordings. My first choice was Jascha Horenstein and set up a meeting with him in Florida where he was conducting the LSO at a festival. We spend a wonderful afternoon in a hotel bar discussing possibilities. We decided to shoot for Mahler 3 which he would be conducting with the LSO a few months later. I still have quotes from the LSO for the necessary sessions. I was ultimately unable to get the funds but Unicorn picked up the ball and recorded it. While discussing other pieces he wanted to record, he mentioned the Roussel symphonies, Dutilleux, Webern and (if the money was restricted to American composers) Ives or Barber. He was most interested in composers with a personal "language".

I still treasure the memories of that afternoon, his rehearsals with the LSO, the 3 concerts we attended and the letter he sent.

Edited by Chuck Nessa

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Some folks might be interested in this story. Back in the late '60s I thought I had a chance to get some foundation money to make classical recordings. My first choice was Jascha Horenstein and set up a meeting with him in Florida where he was conducting the LSO at a festival. We spend a wonderful afternoon in a hotel bar discussing possibilities. We decided to shoot for Mahler 3 which he would be conducting with the LSO a few months later. I still have quotes from the LSO for the necessary sessions. I was ultimately unable to get the funds but Unicorn picked up the ball and recorded it. While discussing other pieces he wanted to record, he mentioned the Roussel symphonies, Dutilleux, Webern and (if the money was restricted to American composers) Ives or Barber. He was most interested in composers with a personal "language".

I still treasure the memories of that afternoon, his rehearsals with the LSO, the 3 concerts we attended and the letter he sent.

Wow! What a great story. Did he ever do a Webern, Ives or Barber recording in the end? How much do you regret not being able to do the sessions yourself? Or do you regret that?

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Does foundation/grant money ever go to the right people? I guess some does, but ....

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