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The Magnificent Goldberg

BFT 113 discussion

33 posts in this topic

I shouldn't really be starting this thread, but I note you said you were wall to wall busy for a while, so I hope you don't think me rude, Nick. But so much of this music has really intrigued me...

1 Bowed bass solo. The drums have stopped. Am I waiting for something to happen or is this it? Oh, I was waiting for something to happen. This is kind of peculiar, but pretty funky and nice. It’s a string quartet I think. There’s something like a trumpet in there but it turns out to be a tenor sax; and a nice one.

Haven’t the foggiest idea of who or what this is, but it’s definitely OK. I don’t think I could listen to a whole album of it, but just a track is a good thing; particularly as an opener.

2 Is this a soprano sax or Rufus Thomas’ escaped funky chicken? Personally I’d have put this one in at #1.

3 WTF? This sounds like an advertising jingle set to music. I think it’s the same player as #2.

4 Something kinda filmic about this. At least it’s not a car chase; more like a young lady being stalked through the dark. Some sample of a not so young lady from the twenties seems to have been incorporated, rather well. I can’t quite make out the words she’s singing, however. The whole thing seems rather Ellington-ish, in the way that Duke painted pictures on your mind. Oh, it’s live. So not a sample of a twenties singeress but a singer actually present, if off-stage, or singing into a cup mute.

This is really not my cup of tea at all, and yet I’m charmed by it and will be disappointed when it ends, in about a minute. Well, the pianist didn’t want it to finish, either.

5 Oh, I know this tune, but can’t think of the title. Is it a Benny Golson tune? Oh, it’s ‘I remember Clifford’, usually a vehicle for a trumpet player but now a tenor player. And played with such feeling! Do I know this guy? I think I probably don’t. Beautiful, just beautiful.

6 Violin, guitar, piano, bass & drums. Sounds like some kind of tribute to Django & Stephane but there’s a hardness to the swing that strikes me as a lot more modern than they’d have handled it. Damn good, though. Actually, I do wonder whether it isn’t Stephane with another guitarist; because the violinist is playing with great grace. Another one I didn’t want to end.

7 The circus has come to town; but there are only elephants. Oh, it really IS elephants on parade. The band vocal sounds like the Arkestra, but that’s silly.

8 Kind of a meandering tune – or was there a head there at all? Was it improv from the word go? Now a singer with something of Leon Thomas about him, but not the richness of his voice. I am not getting this. It’s so bare that I feel that, to really get it, one needs the context of the other tracks on the album, or performance. What I mean is, this feels to me like something that has life in contrast to something else and, without that something else (or elses) I can’t make progress into it. And there’s definitely something to make progress into. But it’s like ‘Old Man Mose’; you need those ‘seven dancing girls all around him, each one wore a smile’ (to quote Louis Prima). As it is, you’re peeping through a crack and seeing an armchair.

9 Western Swing, probably a modern rendition of it. With an accordion in there. Oh yes, into a rumba they go! I’m seriously digging the rhythm of this, but even Amadou Barry, le Super Accordeon du Fouta is more entertaining than this. (Must get that K7 out and give it another go.)

AmadouBarry01m.jpg

10 Well, here’s another one I don’t know anything about, but it seems to have nothing to draw me in. Reminds me vaguely of Ran Blake. Nipping downstairs to get a cup of tea. ‘Scuse.

11 Some serious avant stuff here but there’s not enough joy in it to get me involved. Some of the harmonies between trumpet and sax sound like avant clichés I’ve heard often before (and never really got on with). Actually, quite a lot of this sounds rather like a bunch of clichés joined together. It’s maybe because I don’t listen to a lot of avant music the right way, but, well…

12 Very Dukish intro. ‘I’ve found a new baby’ with scratching. Or is that a guitar? I’m finding that irritating. The trumpet player’s fine. Also the clarinet and trombone. And the pianist. Well, the scratching’s stopped and we just have music. Nice. Full of the tradition, yet very modern. I’m really liking this. But, again, I wonder what a whole album of this would be like – is this something else that lives because it’s different to its surroundings? Oh, live.

13 Solo piano? Two solo pianos? Doesn’t seem to quite swing. Or is it Earl Hines? Nah…

Well, I didn’t expect to hear anything I’d have listened to by choice, but some of it has really drawn me in, and that’s a very good thing.

Thank you very much Nick.

MG

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I do not think you rude. Actually I am happy you wanted to make some comments, which I am enjoying. I just need to take some time to think about a proper response.

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I shouldn't really be starting this thread, but I note you said you were wall to wall busy for a while, so I hope you don't think me rude, Nick. But so much of this music has really intrigued me...

1 Bowed bass solo. The drums have stopped. Am I waiting for something to happen or is this it? Oh, I was waiting for something to happen. This is kind of peculiar, but pretty funky and nice. It’s a string quartet I think. There’s something like a trumpet in there but it turns out to be a tenor sax; and a nice one.

Haven’t the foggiest idea of who or what this is, but it’s definitely OK. I don’t think I could listen to a whole album of it, but just a track is a good thing; particularly as an opener.

It is a bassist but he is playing cello here. There are three strings, trumpet and sax. As far as the whole album goes, it works for me because there is a nice variation in the arrangements and it presents the music of a terrific composer.

2 Is this a soprano sax or Rufus Thomas’ escaped funky chicken? Personally I’d have put this one in at #1.

That is funny. This actually would have been a good #1 as it was on the album it came from. #3 is the same player from the same album. I probably should have made it 2a and 2b.

3 WTF? This sounds like an advertising jingle set to music. I think it’s the same player as #2.

4 Something kinda filmic about this. At least it’s not a car chase; more like a young lady being stalked through the dark. Some sample of a not so young lady from the twenties seems to have been incorporated, rather well. I can’t quite make out the words she’s singing, however. The whole thing seems rather Ellington-ish, in the way that Duke painted pictures on your mind. Oh, it’s live. So not a sample of a twenties singeress but a singer actually present, if off-stage, or singing into a cup mute.

This is really not my cup of tea at all, and yet I’m charmed by it and will be disappointed when it ends, in about a minute. Well, the pianist didn’t want it to finish, either.

You were right at first, it is a sample from an old recoding. I thought maybe one of the traditional guys could get a two for one ID. Because of location, maybe you have heard of this group.

5 Oh, I know this tune, but can’t think of the title. Is it a Benny Golson tune? Oh, it’s ‘I remember Clifford’, usually a vehicle for a trumpet player but now a tenor player. And played with such feeling! Do I know this guy? I think I probably don’t. Beautiful, just beautiful.

This is a really beautiful tune. You may know this guy, certainly know of him. I would say that this is not his typical style.

6 Violin, guitar, piano, bass & drums. Sounds like some kind of tribute to Django & Stephane but there’s a hardness to the swing that strikes me as a lot more modern than they’d have handled it. Damn good, though. Actually, I do wonder whether it isn’t Stephane with another guitarist; because the violinist is playing with great grace. Another one I didn’t want to end.

My hat is off to you because this is Stephane Grappelli in a more modern setting (from 1978). On the other hand, there is no piano or drums on the track.

7 The circus has come to town; but there are only elephants. Oh, it really IS elephants on parade. The band vocal sounds like the Arkestra, but that’s silly.

I used this mostly for the fun of it although I do like the arrangement and the piano playing. It is Sun Ra.

8 Kind of a meandering tune – or was there a head there at all? Was it improv from the word go? Now a singer with something of Leon Thomas about him, but not the richness of his voice. I am not getting this. It’s so bare that I feel that, to really get it, one needs the context of the other tracks on the album, or performance. What I mean is, this feels to me like something that has life in contrast to something else and, without that something else (or elses) I can’t make progress into it. And there’s definitely something to make progress into. But it’s like ‘Old Man Mose’; you need those ‘seven dancing girls all around him, each one wore a smile’ (to quote Louis Prima). As it is, you’re peeping through a crack and seeing an armchair.

Interesting comments. Not sure how to respond. The album is made up of tracks from a couple of concert dates and I think it is mostly group improv from the get go. This track is listed as a South American folk tune,so after the guitar intro I guess they start with that and improvise from there. As far as the “singing” goes (don't know Leon Thomas), the liner notes say the guy sings when he is happy.

9 Western Swing, probably a modern rendition of it. With an accordion in there. Oh yes, into a rumba they go! I’m seriously digging the rhythm of this, but even Amadou Barry, le Super Accordeon du Fouta is more entertaining than this. (Must get that K7 out and give it another go.)

AmadouBarry01m.jpg

10 Well, here’s another one I don’t know anything about, but it seems to have nothing to draw me in. Reminds me vaguely of Ran Blake. Nipping downstairs to get a cup of tea. ‘Scuse.

Got me again, I really don't know enough about Ran Blake to comment on any similarity

11 Some serious avant stuff here but there’s not enough joy in it to get me involved. Some of the harmonies between trumpet and sax sound like avant clichés I’ve heard often before (and never really got on with). Actually, quite a lot of this sounds rather like a bunch of clichés joined together. It’s maybe because I don’t listen to a lot of avant music the right way, but, well…

This is a fairly recent album but the musicians have been around. Maybe they are playing some of there own cliches.

I sort of knew the two previous tracks would be outside the zone for a good share of the BFT regulars (maybe most) but outside the comfort zone is why I listen to BFTs. If you give something a try, you never know. Thanks for giving it a try.

12 Very Dukish intro. ‘I’ve found a new baby’ with scratching. Or is that a guitar? I’m finding that irritating. The trumpet player’s fine. Also the clarinet and trombone. And the pianist. Well, the scratching’s stopped and we just have music. Nice. Full of the tradition, yet very modern. I’m really liking this. But, again, I wonder what a whole album of this would be like – is this something else that lives because it’s different to its surroundings? Oh, live.

Didn't care for the piano intro, eh? Glad it got better for you. This is a real favorite for me, the tradition but modern thing.

13 Solo piano? Two solo pianos? Doesn’t seem to quite swing. Or is it Earl Hines? Nah…

Well, I didn’t expect to hear anything I’d have listened to by choice, but some of it has really drawn me in, and that’s a very good thing.

Solo.

Thank you very much Nick.

Thanks for having a listen. I wish my comments were as good as yours.

MG

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2 Is this a soprano sax or Rufus Thomas’ escaped funky chicken? Personally I’d have put this one in at #1.

That is funny. This actually would have been a good #1 as it was on the album it came from. #3 is the same player from the same album. I probably should have made it 2a and 2b.

3 WTF? This sounds like an advertising jingle set to music. I think it’s the same player as #2.

6 Violin, guitar, piano, bass & drums. Sounds like some kind of tribute to Django & Stephane but there’s a hardness to the swing that strikes me as a lot more modern than they’d have handled it. Damn good, though. Actually, I do wonder whether it isn’t Stephane with another guitarist; because the violinist is playing with great grace. Another one I didn’t want to end.

My hat is off to you because this is Stephane Grappelli in a more modern setting (from 1978). On the other hand, there is no piano or drums on the track.

7 The circus has come to town; but there are only elephants. Oh, it really IS elephants on parade. The band vocal sounds like the Arkestra, but that’s silly.

I used this mostly for the fun of it although I do like the arrangement and the piano playing. It is Sun Ra.

What?!?!?! I got two?

Gor blimey!

And do I get half a point for #2 & #3?

MG

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2 Is this a soprano sax or Rufus Thomas’ escaped funky chicken? Personally I’d have put this one in at #1.

That is funny. This actually would have been a good #1 as it was on the album it came from. #3 is the same player from the same album. I probably should have made it 2a and 2b.

3 WTF? This sounds like an advertising jingle set to music. I think it’s the same player as #2.

6 Violin, guitar, piano, bass & drums. Sounds like some kind of tribute to Django & Stephane but there’s a hardness to the swing that strikes me as a lot more modern than they’d have handled it. Damn good, though. Actually, I do wonder whether it isn’t Stephane with another guitarist; because the violinist is playing with great grace. Another one I didn’t want to end.

My hat is off to you because this is Stephane Grappelli in a more modern setting (from 1978). On the other hand, there is no piano or drums on the track.

7 The circus has come to town; but there are only elephants. Oh, it really IS elephants on parade. The band vocal sounds like the Arkestra, but that’s silly.

I used this mostly for the fun of it although I do like the arrangement and the piano playing. It is Sun Ra.

What?!?!?! I got two?

Gor blimey!

And do I get half a point for #2 & #3?

MG

Sure, why not. Just don't get too cocky.

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Here's the first part ...

  1. We begin with the age-old BFT debate, is it a bass or a cello? I say cello. Damn good playing, too. The song is "Lady Sings the Blues." After one chorus, the rest of the string quartet arrives. All the string playing is strong and impressive. Third chorus we're joined by a trombone and a tenor. Gee whiz, wonder why I think of Wolter Wierbos and Toby Delius? I need to collect this one. I rarely hear jazz string playing as good as this.

  2. A nice woody clarinet sound. Got no guess.

  3. A clarinet boogaloo. Sounds like the day Perry Robinson and Lou Donaldson got their gig calendars mixed up. How 'bout that bass player?

  4. An appealing 5/4 groove, with more clarinet and trombone, reminiscent of Ellingtonian sounds in a non-retro way. The sample from an old blues 78 floors me (is that Bessie?). The Lincoln Center folks should listen to this. I need to collect this one, too.

  5. "I Remember Clifford," tenor and bass. The tenor is very reverent toward the melody, letting go only at the very end. Beautiful.

  6. One of those Django tunes, I know the tune but not the title. Maybe a David Grisman band? Very well played.

  7. Heh heh. Recognized it from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stay_Awake:_Various_Interpretations_of_Music_from_Vintage_Disney_Films

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Here's the first part ...

  1. We begin with the age-old BFT debate, is it a bass or a cello? I say cello. Damn good playing, too. The song is "Lady Sings the Blues." After one chorus, the rest of the string quartet arrives. All the string playing is strong and impressive. Third chorus we're joined by a trombone and a tenor. Gee whiz, wonder why I think of Wolter Wierbos and Toby Delius? I need to collect this one. I rarely hear jazz string playing as good as this.

  2. A nice woody clarinet sound. Got no guess.

  3. A clarinet boogaloo. Sounds like the day Perry Robinson and Lou Donaldson got their gig calendars mixed up. How 'bout that bass player?

  4. An appealing 5/4 groove, with more clarinet and trombone, reminiscent of Ellingtonian sounds in a non-retro way. The sample from an old blues 78 floors me (is that Bessie?). The Lincoln Center folks should listen to this. I need to collect this one, too.

  5. "I Remember Clifford," tenor and bass. The tenor is very reverent toward the melody, letting go only at the very end. Beautiful.

  6. One of those Django tunes, I know the tune but not the title. Maybe a David Grisman band? Very well played.

  7. Heh heh. Recognized it from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stay_Awake:_Various_Interpretations_of_Music_from_Vintage_Disney_Films

1. You are correct with the cello but there are only 3 strings. Kind of subtle. Of coarse, you have the right song as well. The horn players are not the Dutch boys. And I've been calling this a trumpet, so I stand corrected as well. This has always been a favorite album of mine but I really didn't even realize how good I thought it was until I was looking for tracks for this BFT. I would have been happy using anything from the album.

There is one of the other Dutch musicians on a later track but I tried to stay away from stuff I used the first time around.

2 & 3. These two track go together. I should have made them a and b because I really wan't trying to be tricky or anything. You've expose me, I don't know Lou Donaldson, so I don't get your reference. However, this is Perry Robinson. I think this is a really fun album.

4. Glad you like this one. One of my favorites from the last year or so. I need to look up a couple of things before I make a further comment.

5. Right song and I totally agree with your comments.

6. David Grisman, yes. Django, yes.

7. You are all over this one as well. I was a kid in the 50s with all the Disney stuff and I really enjoy this album, not much jazz content though. I actually thought of using Aaron Neville and Dr. John doing the "Mickey Mouse Club Theme" but that might have been pushing it alittle.

I am glad you checked in. Good comments.

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The sample on track 4 is not Bessie Smith. I'm not that familiar with her sound so I want to check a couple of clips. There is a similarity to the singer here. There was another possible similiarity name wise but I couldn't find any information.

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I will comment on the first seven songs now, and the rest later.

1. This starts with some really good arco bass playing, or maybe it is a cello. On two of my Blindfold Tests I included some Richard Davis arco bass soloing and members here thought it was a cello each time. So now I am less certain of that myself.

Who is this? That is an enjoyable muted trombone solo. The strings are so precise, yet bluesy. Who comprises a precise jazz string ensemble with sax and trombone added, but no piano or drums? I have never heard of this ensemble or recording.

2. What a startling, shrill saxophone sound. You really grabbed my attention, in a good way. I have no idea who it is. Solo sax pieces should sometimes be short like this. Many solo sax pieces seem to last for at least 20 minutes. Saxophonists playing them would do well to take this player's example and be more brief sometimes.

3. This is odd to me. It sounds like an English rock group trying to play jazz, except for the saxophone player, who seems like a real jazz artist.

4. This is so reminiscent of Duke Ellington's late triumphs, like something that might have appeared on "New Orleans Suite" or "Afro Eurasian Eclipse". The pianist is not Duke but gets Duke's feel in his playing. The drummer sounds very much like someone who would have played with Duke from 1960 on. The muted trombone player sounds like he actually could have played with Duke, again from 1960 on.

But it's live, and there is an old recording played while the band is playing. Who could this be? I am really curious. Whoever it is, they understand Duke Ellington better than just about any of the tribute bands which have come along. They get inside Duke's sound and feel.

5. I do not know the saxophone player who is playing "I Remember Clifford" here, but he is good. The bass player is good too, with a full, vocal sound, which I really like.

6. This sounds like Stephane Grappelli with David Grisman to me. It reminds me of the music which Johnny Depp and the gypsies played by the river in the film "Chocolat."

7, Sun Ra and Arkestra doing "Pink Elephants On Parade" from the "Stay Awake" album, Hal Wilner's Disney collection. I have always liked how the Arkestra plays with more precision here than on many of Sun Ra's own albums. That opening brass stuff--the Arkestra's brass never played so cleanly on Sun Ra's own music, perhaps by Sun Ra's preference or design.

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I will comment on the first seven songs now, and the rest later.

1. This starts with some really good arco bass playing, or maybe it is a cello. On two of my Blindfold Tests I included some Richard Davis arco bass soloing and members here thought it was a cello each time. So now I am less certain of that myself.

Who is this? That is an enjoyable muted trombone solo. The strings are so precise, yet bluesy. Who comprises a precise jazz string ensemble with sax and trombone added, but no piano or drums? I have never heard of this ensemble or recording.

Three sets of comments and all likes. Yeah. This is a cello. That does get tricky, especially when the guy playing it is mostly know as a bassist.

2. What a startling, shrill saxophone sound. You really grabbed my attention, in a good way. I have no idea who it is. Solo sax pieces should sometimes be short like this. Many solo sax pieces seem to last for at least 20 minutes. Saxophonists playing them would do well to take this player's example and be more brief sometimes.

3. This is odd to me. It sounds like an English rock group trying to play jazz, except for the saxophone player, who seems like a real jazz artist.

Again, 2 and 3 go together. I screwed up not making that known. Would it help the ID to note the horn is a clarinet. You know, I really don't know anything about the rest of the group. I must go to google.

4. This is so reminiscent of Duke Ellington's late triumphs, like something that might have appeared on "New Orleans Suite" or "Afro Eurasian Eclipse". The pianist is not Duke but gets Duke's feel in his playing. The drummer sounds very much like someone who would have played with Duke from 1960 on. The muted trombone player sounds like he actually could have played with Duke, again from 1960 on.

But it's live, and there is an old recording played while the band is playing. Who could this be? I am really curious. Whoever it is, they understand Duke Ellington better than just about any of the tribute bands which have come along. They get inside Duke's sound and feel.

This one has been well received so far. Another Yeah.

5. I do not know the saxophone player who is playing "I Remember Clifford" here, but he is good. The bass player is good too, with a full, vocal sound, which I really like.

6. This sounds like Stephane Grappelli with David Grisman to me. It reminds me of the music which Johnny Depp and the gypsies played by the river in the film "Chocolat."

MG thought Grapelli. Joe thought Grisman. You got them both. It is a little Dawg music.

7, Sun Ra and Arkestra doing "Pink Elephants On Parade" from the "Stay Awake" album, Hal Wilner's Disney collection. I have always liked how the Arkestra plays with more precision here than on many of Sun Ra's own albums. That opening brass stuff--the Arkestra's brass never played so cleanly on Sun Ra's own music, perhaps by Sun Ra's preference or design.

Again, MG thought of Sun Ra because of the vocalization. Joe knew the album. You KC guys share your collections? I like this arrangement of the song and it is fun.

Thanks for checking in. Good comments.

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Bill,

In regard to #3, I have always thought that the drummer in particular had some rock sensibilities. I could have noted that the clarinet player (leader) was called by Joe and is pretty well known. What I could find about the rest of the group is all jazz related. Actually, the drummer is probably known to most of you guys who are sharper than I am. He has kind of an interesting story.

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Received and listened to briefly on the bus this morning. I know one and have it in my collection so I'm delighted so far...

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Received and listened to briefly on the bus this morning. I know one and have it in my collection so I'm delighted so far...

Always fun to recognize something. Seldom happens for me. Shoot, the last time something was use that I own, I didn't recognize it. :crazy:

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I will now provide my comments on #8 to the end.

8. This is a wonderful track, wow! Could this be Jim Pepper? Otherwise I have no idea who it could be, but I love this song.

9. This sounds like South African jazz with the addition of a banjo (or other stringed instrument) and accordian. I have no idea who it could be, but it is very appealing music.

10. Here we are in the real avant garde. This is as out there as Cecil Taylor gets, but the pianist is too light of touch to be Cecil. I do not know who it is, but this trio is really good at this style of music.

11. This sounds like one of the Arista/Freedom albums I bought in the 1970s. I wonder if I have this one and don't remember it. The pianist could be Muhal Richard Abrams but I am not sure about that. I like the trumpet player very much.

12. "I've Found a New Baby" delivered in a fascinating way--in some parts rather avant garde, then it comes back inside, but always somewhat off-kilter. This is an imaginative group of musicians. I can't wait to find out who this is.

13. I feel that I know this pianist--that the identification is on the tip of my tongue, but I can't do it. Very interesting playing, not cliched jazz piano.

This is a really interesting, enjoyable BFT!

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I will now provide my comments on #8 to the end.

8. This is a wonderful track, wow! Could this be Jim Pepper? Otherwise I have no idea who it could be, but I love this song.

It isn't Jim Pepper. I don't know him well enough (or have a good enough ear for that matter) to comment on any similarities to either of the sax guys here.

9. This sounds like South African jazz with the addition of a banjo (or other stringed instrument) and accordian. I have no idea who it could be, but it is very appealing music.

This is kind of fun. The music has already been likened to Western Swing and South African Jazz. I really thought this would be IDed right away but did wonder if the accordian would throw things off.

10. Here we are in the real avant garde. This is as out there as Cecil Taylor gets, but the pianist is too light of touch to be Cecil. I do not know who it is, but this trio is really good at this style of music.

You are right, it is not Cecil. I may just be the only one who really likes this one but I had to go out a little.

11. This sounds like one of the Arista/Freedom albums I bought in the 1970s. I wonder if I have this one and don't remember it. The pianist could be Muhal Richard Abrams but I am not sure about that. I like the trumpet player very much.

It isn't Mr. Abrams (he is one of my favorite pianists though). Most of these guys were playing in the 1970s but the music is from a live date in 2007. I like the trumpet player very much as well. I am pretty sure you and everyone else know him.

12. "I've Found a New Baby" delivered in a fascinating way--in some parts rather avant garde, then it comes back inside, but always somewhat off-kilter. This is an imaginative group of musicians. I can't wait to find out who this is.

Nice description. This is, I think, a pretty obscure album.

13. I feel that I know this pianist--that the identification is on the tip of my tongue, but I can't do it. Very interesting playing, not cliched jazz piano.

I hope you do get the ID. I only started listening to this pianist a couple of years ago and I can't get enough.

This is a really interesting, enjoyable BFT!

I am really happy you found some interesting stuff. I think there will be some more IDs coming, track 9 for sure. If not I will try to think of some hints.

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Had a few of these in the rotation over the last few days, but by-and-large, just a one-off listen and comment. Much I liked in here and like all good BFTs will cost me money. Only one that I pegged, which is frustrating. I'm most interested in finding out what #13 is.

Track 1 - Lady Sings The Blues and a lovely rendition. My immediate thought is Buell Neidlinger, but there is no degree of confidence there. No idea who the horns are, but that tenor could be Sean Bergin.

Track 2 - There's nothing particularly wrong with this, but it just isn't reaching me. I'm guessing a European musician, but only because it seems to meander more than groove in any particular way.

Track 3 - This is fun. It's not really a conversation, but more like a chat. I wouldn't spend too much time with it, but what I hear here, I like. Seems like it's making an honest effort to pay homage to an older style, 'til the final moments.

Track 4 - The bass hook has me. That smoky, sleepy, trance-like groove -- gets me every time. The best Masada has this feel. Typically don't like sampling, but this is just right. No idea the clarinet. Diggin' the 'bone -- he's got that mute workin'. Could this be a Dave Douglas project? This is nice throughout -- I want this.

Track 5 - I Remember Clifford by a big, modern tenor. Has that muscular tone kind of like Odean Pope, but something about the note choices of the bass and the attack of the tenor has me thinking a European players again.

Track 6 - My first thought was Dave Grisman's version of Minor Swing, but this is newer. I end up on the bill with a band that plays a lot of stuff in this vein, and I always enjoy it for a song or two, but then my interest wanes. The musicianship is impressive, but the impression does not last for me.

Track 7 - This is Sun Ra's take on Pink Elephants on Parade. I think it's taken from this (

Track 8 - Not sure what it is, but I completely love this. Maybe Faruq Z. Bey? It owes a nod to Kahil El'Zabar's Ritual Trio to my ear, but there's not a thing wrong with that. I could listen to this all day and all night.

Track 9 - Nothing not to love here. It has a slight sloppiness that leads me to believe it is authentic. Perhaps music from Mali? Reminds me of Roswell Rudd's Malicool. Again, I could listen to this a lot. I'd love it if U.S. radio would play this sort of thing instead of the tired-ass, glossy-covered shit they were distributing when I was working for Public Radio. Of course, the latter are the only shows that survived the cut... as usual. More Jonas Brothers Jazz for the foreseeable future.

Track 10 - Seems like it's being weird to be weird. Thirsty Ear managed to pull this off as well as anyone so far, particular the Shipp stuff. I like elements of this, but it doesn't fully come together for me. The Doomy piano chords are a win, but it's almost like the string instrument is not listening. I don't believe that's an acoustic bass (unless there are actually two string instruments -- ah yes, that seems to be the case).

Track 11 - Gah! I want the last pianist on this track with this rhythm section! I enjoyed that but have no intelligent guesses. Hell, I don't have any stupid guesses.

Track 12 - Part of me loves this. Part of me hears it as too clean. Yeah, the "collective improv," sort of loses the nice feel they had set up and it turns into "look how fast *I* can play, Mom!" Could this be a Wynton project?

Track 13 - My first impressions were Mal Waldron, but it isn't him; there's more technique (and that's no slight to Mal, just not his style). Could actually be Kenny Barron. If this isn't a tribute to Mal, it should be.

Thanks for the ear porn.

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Had a few of these in the rotation over the last few days, but by-and-large, just a one-off listen and comment. Much I liked in here and like all good BFTs will cost me money. Only one that I pegged, which is frustrating. I'm most interested in finding out what #13 is.

Actually, you pegged more than one.

Track 1 - Lady Sings The Blues and a lovely rendition. My immediate thought is Buell Neidlinger, but there is no degree of confidence there. No idea who the horns are, but that tenor could be Sean Bergin.

Your immediate thought is right on. The tenor plays on a number of his albums I know of.

Track 2 - There's nothing particularly wrong with this, but it just isn't reaching me. I'm guessing a European musician, but only because it seems to meander more than groove in any particular way.

Track 3 - This is fun. It's not really a conversation, but more like a chat. I wouldn't spend too much time with it, but what I hear here, I like. Seems like it's making an honest effort to pay homage to an older style, 'til the final moments.

I think this is fun too. Again, I should have noted 2 and 3 went together. I actually thought it would be noted. Not a European.

Track 4 - The bass hook has me. That smoky, sleepy, trance-like groove -- gets me every time. The best Masada has this feel. Typically don't like sampling, but this is just right. No idea the clarinet. Diggin' the 'bone -- he's got that mute workin'. Could this be a Dave Douglas project? This is nice throughout -- I want this.

This is probably not a well know album or group of musicians. I feel like you do about the sampling. They use the effect on three of the six tracks on the album.

Track 5 - I Remember Clifford by a big, modern tenor. Has that muscular tone kind of like Odean Pope, but something about the note choices of the bass and the attack of the tenor has me thinking a European players again.

The recording label and bass player are European, tenor is an American. I would say this is not his typical style. I need to hear a little Odean Pope.

Track 6 - My first thought was Dave Grisman's version of Minor Swing, but this is newer. I end up on the bill with a band that plays a lot of stuff in this vein, and I always enjoy it for a song or two, but then my interest wanes. The musicianship is impressive, but the impression does not last for me.

The song is Minor Swing and if you read the previous comments you know it is David Grisman as well. I have to be in a certain mood, maybe with a beer in hand, when I listen to this. It takes me back to my younger days when Omaha had a couple of bars with some really good live bluegrass.

Track 7 - This is Sun Ra's take on Pink Elephants on Parade. I think it's taken from this (

Didn't fool anyone on this.

Track 8 - Not sure what it is, but I completely love this. Maybe Faruq Z. Bey? It owes a nod to Kahil El'Zabar's Ritual Trio to my ear, but there's not a thing wrong with that. I could listen to this all day and all night.

I can hear your El'Zabar comment.

Track 9 - Nothing not to love here. It has a slight sloppiness that leads me to believe it is authentic. Perhaps music from Mali? Reminds me of Roswell Rudd's Malicool. Again, I could listen to this a lot. I'd love it if U.S. radio would play this sort of thing instead of the tired-ass, glossy-covered shit they were distributing when I was working for Public Radio. Of course, the latter are the only shows that survived the cut... as usual. More Jonas Brothers Jazz for the foreseeable future.

I like you comments here. Everybody has a different thought on where this music comes from. Maybe that is a good hint for where this does come from.

Track 10 - Seems like it's being weird to be weird. Thirsty Ear managed to pull this off as well as anyone so far, particular the Shipp stuff. I like elements of this, but it doesn't fully come together for me. The Doomy piano chords are a win, but it's almost like the string instrument is not listening. I don't believe that's an acoustic bass (unless there are actually two string instruments -- ah yes, that seems to be the case).

To my tin ear these guys seem to be totally together, they have played together for a long time. It is not a bass and there is only one string. To me, if a string instrument sounds like other ones, it can only be one guy. I'm not sure that makes sense anywhere but in my head.

Track 11 - Gah! I want the last pianist on this track with this rhythm section! I enjoyed that but have no intelligent guesses. Hell, I don't have any stupid guesses.

Do you mean the pianist from track 13? If so, that pianist would fit in perfectly and his actually has a history with some of these musicians, one of the sax players on track 8 as well.

Track 12 - Part of me loves this. Part of me hears it as too clean. Yeah, the "collective improv," sort of loses the nice feel they had set up and it turns into "look how fast *I* can play, Mom!" Could this be a Wynton project?

Not Wynton

Track 13 - My first impressions were Mal Waldron, but it isn't him; there's more technique (and that's no slight to Mal, just not his style). Could actually be Kenny Barron. If this isn't a tribute to Mal, it should be.

Not Kenny Barron.

Thanks for the ear porn.

:smirk:Funny, when I'm on the forum and my wife asks me what I'm looking at, I tell her I'm on my porn site.

Thanks for listening. I am please you liked some of these things.

Edited by NIS

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Thom,

When I was responding to your post the boss told me to get off my ass, we were late to meet some friends for dinner. So, I didn't proof read and put Wynton instead of NOT Wynton for track 12. It is definately not Wynton so I hope I didn't throw anyone off the track.

I was looking at your website. I already knew this but I am in way over my head talking music to a bunch of musicians, writers and just generally knowledgable folks.

I also took a look at your record label site. One of the musicians on track 8 is listed on the home page. Little hint.

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Okay, here we go...

Track 1 - Wow...off to an interesting start! I don't know this, but I like it. Something is telling me Black Saint label here...some of those folks. And the violinist's sound reminds me of Leroy Jenkins at times, but on the other hand, it's too "inside." I love the arrangement. I must know this tenor player, at least. Love the sound when he comes in after the 4:30 mark. This is very cool...lots of soul in this performance.
Track 2 - Is that a bass clarinet? I like this. Way too short though, needed to hear more!
Track 3 - Okay, this is happening...this is just the kind of stuff I love, forward-thinking and backward-looking at the same time. Love the clarinet player, once again. There's a lot of familiar-sounding playing here, but I struggle to come up with names. I'm kinda thinking Cecil McBee on bass, but it's a little hard to tell from the recording. I like this a lot.
Track 4 - While I did enjoy this, and definitely appreciate/respect it, overall it didn't take me anywhere special. Didn't "grab" me. Still, curious as to who it is and what is the story with the singing that comes in after the 2-minute mark...sounds like a sample from an old record.
Track 5 - I Remember Clifford. Always loved this tune. This is a nice version, but I wish it was longer and went somewhere...not enough "meat" for me, but it was nice. Great sounds from both the tenor player and the bass player.
Track 6 - This is not really to my taste, but the musicianship is fantastic...terrific interplay, the players are wonderfully in sync.
Track 7 - Hmmm...I am a little puzzled/baffled by this one to be honest! The one thing I do want to say is that I really like the piano player and was hoping to hear more from him/her...what was there was really interesting.
Track 8 - Wow, this took me to another place. And I was happy to be there. :) This is fantastic, just love the mood and feel of it. Beautiful playing from the alto player especially, he is really feeling it here. The tenor player is coming from a totally different place but sounds great also. Overall this is pretty stunning. Anxious to find out who it is. I feel like I should know who the alto player is, but I'm coming up blank.
Track 9 - This is a fun one. Great energy, nice feel. This sounds somewhere halfway between New Orleans and South Africa. Cool stuff.
Track 10 - This never totally got off the ground for me, but at the same time I'd like to hear more from these folks to really try and key in on what they're doing. This particular piece felt somewhat aimless to me. But the piano player has something to say. I'm just not sure the cellist and drummer are fully involved in the conversation. Hmmm...don't know. I am conflicted about this.
Track 11 - I like it. Some terrific ensemble playing here. And they really settle into a nice groove once the "solos" start. Something about the tenor player makes me think John Tchicai, but I'm sure that's wrong. I really like the trumpet player too...he/she has a very fluid sense of phrasing and note choices. This is cool. I really like the way things start to cook from 6:45 on! The concept here sounds very European, so maybe these are European players, at least the rhythm section.
Track 12 - Ack, the name of this tune is escaping me! This is a very creative take on it though...old meets new. Nicely done. I like the ending bit especially where they fall out of time and then back in at a faster tempo.
Track 13 - This is really good. The first person I thought of was Mal Waldron, but I'm not sure that it's him...though it certainly sounds like someone who is influenced by him. Great performance, and the tune is hypnotic. Curious to find out who this is.
Overall, some terrific stuff here! Thanks so much for the fun! :tup
Edited by webbcity

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Okay, here we go...

Tim, thanks for having a listen.

Track 1 - Wow...off to an interesting start! I don't know this, but I like it. Something is telling me Black Saint label here...some of those folks. And the violinist's sound reminds me of Leroy Jenkins at times, but on the other hand, it's too "inside." I love the arrangement. I must know this tenor player, at least. Love the sound when he comes in after the 4:30 mark. This is very cool...lots of soul in this performance.
Not Black Saint. Buell Niedlinger has been IDed. The tenor player is on a number of his albums.
Track 2 - Is that a bass clarinet? I like this. Way too short though, needed to hear more!
Track 3 - Okay, this is happening...this is just the kind of stuff I love, forward-thinking and backward-looking at the same time. Love the clarinet player, once again. There's a lot of familiar-sounding playing here, but I struggle to come up with names. I'm kinda thinking Cecil McBee on bass, but it's a little hard to tell from the recording. I like this a lot.
Perry Robinson has also been identified. The other guys are not that well know, to me at least.
Track 4 - While I did enjoy this, and definitely appreciate/respect it, overall it didn't take me anywhere special. Didn't "grab" me. Still, curious as to who it is and what is the story with the singing that comes in after the 2-minute mark...sounds like a sample from an old record.
It is a sample from an old record. I think it's neat how they work it in at a live performance. These are probably the youngest musicians on the BFT but they definately have an ear toward the past.
Track 5 - I Remember Clifford. Always loved this tune. This is a nice version, but I wish it was longer and went somewhere...not enough "meat" for me, but it was nice. Great sounds from both the tenor player and the bass player.
Track 6 - This is not really to my taste, but the musicianship is fantastic...terrific interplay, the players are wonderfully in sync.
Track 7 - Hmmm...I am a little puzzled/baffled by this one to be honest! The one thing I do want to say is that I really like the piano player and was hoping to hear more from him/her...what was there was really interesting.
As a Disney compliation, I guess they weren't really worried about the jazz content but I think Sun Ra was a very interesting piano player. I think he started doing some Disney stuff in concerts after this record.
Track 8 - Wow, this took me to another place. And I was happy to be there. :) This is fantastic, just love the mood and feel of it. Beautiful playing from the alto player especially, he is really feeling it here. The tenor player is coming from a totally different place but sounds great also. Overall this is pretty stunning. Anxious to find out who it is. I feel like I should know who the alto player is, but I'm coming up blank.
Thumbs up to your comments. One of these guys is from your part of the world, New England anyway.
Track 9 - This is a fun one. Great energy, nice feel. This sounds somewhere halfway between New Orleans and South Africa. Cool stuff.
Somebody finally went to New Orleans. I thought this one might have been a gimme, especially after Jeffcrom IDed it after a twenty second sound check when he did the download link for me.
Track 10 - This never totally got off the ground for me, but at the same time I'd like to hear more from these folks to really try and key in on what they're doing. This particular piece felt somewhat aimless to me. But the piano player has something to say. I'm just not sure the cellist and drummer are fully involved in the conversation. Hmmm...don't know. I am conflicted about this.
Track 11 - I like it. Some terrific ensemble playing here. And they really settle into a nice groove once the "solos" start. Something about the tenor player makes me think John Tchicai, but I'm sure that's wrong. I really like the trumpet player too...he/she has a very fluid sense of phrasing and note choices. This is cool. I really like the way things start to cook from 6:45 on! The concept here sounds very European, so maybe these are European players, at least the rhythm section.
Happy someone likes this , well beside me. I thought the trumpet player would be guessed. Your European comment is pretty good, even though two of the musicians were born elsewhere. The others are from the UK.
Since we are pretty late in the month, I will note that this is not John Tchicai but he can be found on another track on the BFT.
Track 12 - Ack, the name of this tune is escaping me! This is a very creative take on it though...old meets new. Nicely done. I like the ending bit especially where they fall out of time and then back in at a faster tempo.
Nice comments.
Track 13 - This is really good. The first person I thought of was Mal Waldron, but I'm not sure that it's him...though it certainly sounds like someone who is influenced by him. Great performance, and the tune is hypnotic. Curious to find out who this is.
Well, Allmusic lists Mal Waldron as an influence. This is the second time he was mentioned here in regard to this track. I have seen Cecil Taylor as an influence also but I don't think you would know that from this track.
Overall, some terrific stuff here! Thanks so much for the fun! :tup

Thanks for your comments. I am very pleased you liked some things.

Edited by NIS

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Well, I'm pretty late, as usual, but at least I got my comments in before the end of the month this time. I haven't read the thread, but I imagine that a lot has been identified by now. A few slightly negative comments notwithstanding, there was nothing I hated, and I like most of it very much. (Well, track 12 did kind of annoy me.)

1. A little chamber group plays Herbie Nichols. Cool! I love this; excellent concept and playing all around. I would guess that it’s a Dave Douglas project, but I don’t know for sure.

2. Some really striking clarinet playing; the player has great command of harmonics, “false” fingerings, and extended techniques. It came off like a 21st-century field holler, and that’s a good thing.

3. Perry Robinson, playing “Atomic Twist” from his 1978 album The Traveler. This is a hoot. Philip Wilson and bassist Frank Luther sound great here, as does pianist Hilly Dolganes, about whom I know nothing. Robinson has such a strange sound on clarinet; it’s not my favorite clarinet sound, but it’s his own – he could never be mistaken for anyone else, and that’s half the battle of playing jazz.

4.Well, I don’t know this piece, but it sure sounds like Wynton Marsalis. All the following comments are based on the assumption that it is indeed Wynton – if it’s not him, I don’t know who it is.

Lots of folks here think hate all of Wynton’s output. I don’t like what he represents, but I think that he’s creating some excellent music and some boring music. Whether or not this is Mr. Marsalis, this is excellent. I love the feel and the interpolated blues vocal, which seems to come from another world. I’ll be interested to find out about this one, and if it’s WM.

5. Good, as far as it went. I just went these guys took it “I Remember Clifford” a little further down the road.

6. Here’s where a prejudice of mine affects my judgment. This is very well done; everyone is talented and accomplished. I just wish they hadn’t done it. The whole “gypsy jazz” movement bores me, except when it’s Djano playing. I know that this says more about me than about this music.

7. Sun Ra and the Arkestra playing “Pink Elephants on Parade” from Hal Willner’s Disney album. This is a hoot, and inspired Ra to bring a bunch of Disney songs into the book. I like the way that you can pick out individual voices in the ensemble blend, like John Gilmore’s. I’ve always liked this one.

8. This is beautiful, although I don’t know who/what it is. The tenor player/singer made me think of Charles Lloyd, but I don’t know if Mr. Lloyd has recorded with this instrumentation. The alto player is scary good – wonderful sound, excellent technique, good ideas, and a four-octave range.

9. “Please Let Me Stay a Little Longer,” by the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, from Funeral for a Friend, one of my favorite brass band albums. David Hidalgo of Los Lobos is the guest accordionist. Great Caribbean groove here. It’s excellent, and it’s not even close to being my favorite track on the album.

10. This is certainly an enigmatic little piece. It’s intriguing, but a challenge – not just because of the “advanced” musical language, but because the string player (a cellist?) seems like he’s in a different world than the pianist and percussionist. There might be a connection there, but so far I’m not hearing it so much.

11. Now these guys make it work, for the most part. For much of the piece, they are each following his/her own path, but the paths are parallel, and all going in the same direction, something I didn’t hear with our string player above. It could be argued that this piece goes on too long – I hear a natural stopping point at around five minutes, but the trumpet player disagrees, and so the piece goes on. But it’s still excellent collective improvising.

12. They found a new baby, indeed. Some interesting stuff here, but I there’s an annoying undertone to this – like they’re making fun of older jazz as much as paying tribute. Again, maybe that’s me.

13. Another Herbie Nichols tune to bookend this blindfold test – I think. But I can’t come up with the name, so maybe I’m wrong about the composer. But this is an nice performance by a performance who has heard Mal Waldron.

Interesting stuff - I'm looking forward to finding out more.

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Well, coupla embarrassments in my comments.

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First off, thank you for setting up the BFT download link for me and allowing me to have some fun.

Well, I'm pretty late, as usual, but at least I got my comments in before the end of the month this time. I haven't read the thread, but I imagine that a lot has been identified by now. A few slightly negative comments notwithstanding, there was nothing I hated, and I like most of it very much. (Well, track 12 did kind of annoy me.)

Well, a couple of things were know by almost everyone, but there is actually alot left to ID.

1. A little chamber group plays Herie Nichols. Cool! I love this; excellent concept and playing all around. I would guess that it’s a Dave Douglas project, but I don’t know for sure.

You have read the comments, so you know who this is. This has always been a favorite album but when I was putting the BFT together I found that I liked it even more than I thought. Great arangements but it is all about the tunes for me. According to the liner notes, Neidlinger had told his friend Herbie Nichols that some day he would make an album of his tunes with strings.

2. Some really striking clarinet playing; the player has great command of harmonics, “false” fingerings, and extended techniques. It came off like a 21st-century field holler, and that’s a good thing.

3. Perry Robinson, playing “Atomic Twist” from his 1978 album The Traveler. This is a hoot. Philip Wilson and bassist Frank Luther sound great here, as does pianist Hilly Dolganes, about whom I know nothing. Robinson has such a strange sound on clarinet; it’s not my favorite clarinet sound, but it’s his own – he could never be mistaken for anyone else, and that’s half the battle of playing jazz.

You are all over this one. Track 2 is from the same album.

4.Well, I don’t know this piece, but it sure sounds like Wynton Marsalis. All the following comments are based on the assumption that it is indeed Wynton – if it’s not him, I don’t know who it is.

Lots of folks here think hate all of Wynton’s output. I don’t like what he represents, but I think that he’s creating some excellent music and some boring music. Whether or not this is Mr. Marsalis, this is excellent. I love the feel and the interpolated blues vocal, which seems to come from another world. I’ll be interested to find out about this one, and if it’s WM.

It is not Wynton.

5. Good, as far as it went. I just went these guys took it “I Remember Clifford” a little further down the road.

6. Here’s where a prejudice of mine affects my judgment. This is very well done; everyone is talented and accomplished. I just wish they hadn’t done it. The whole “gypsy jazz” movement bores me, except when it’s Djano playing. I know that this says more about me than about this music.

7. Sun Ra and the Arkestra playing “Pink Elephants on Parade” from Hal Willner’s Disney album. This is a hoot, and inspired Ra to bring a bunch of Disney songs into the book. I like the way that you can pick out individual voices in the ensemble blend, like John Gilmore’s. I’ve always liked this one.

8. This is beautiful, although I don’t know who/what it is. The tenor player/singer made me think of Charles Lloyd, but I don’t know if Mr. Lloyd has recorded with this instrumentation. The alto player is scary good – wonderful sound, excellent technique, good ideas, and a four-octave range.

Not Charles Lloyd.

9. “Please Let Me Stay a Little Longer,” by the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, from Funeral for a Friend, one of my favorite brass band albums. David Hidalgo of Los Lobos is the guest accordionist. Great Caribbean groove here. It’s excellent, and it’s not even close to being my favorite track on the album.

Of coarse, I never expected to get a NO piece by you. Terrific album alright. I actually tried to sell it once. I do worry about myself.

10. This is certainly an enigmatic little piece. It’s intriguing, but a challenge – not just because of the “advanced” musical language, but because the string player (a cellist?) seems like he’s in a different world than the pianist and percussionist. There might be a connection there, but so far I’m not hearing it so much.

So, you are the third musician in the group that thought these guys were not quite on the same page.

11. Now these guys make it work, for the most part. For much of the piece, they are each following his/her own path, but the paths are parallel, and all going in the same direction, something I didn’t hear with our string player above. It could be argued that this piece goes on too long – I hear a natural stopping point at around five minutes, but the trumpet player disagrees, and so the piece goes on. But it’s still excellent collective improvising.

12. They found a new baby, indeed. Some interesting stuff here, but I there’s an annoying undertone to this – like they’re making fun of older jazz as much as paying tribute. Again, maybe that’s me.

I never would have thought that they were making fun, instead maybe having fun with the music if that is different. The leader is the piano player, who has reworked alot of older stuff on albums.

13. Another Herbie Nichols tune to bookend this blindfold test – I think. But I can’t come up with the name, so maybe I’m wrong about the composer. But this is an nice performance by a performance who has heard Mal Waldron. This one is not a Herbie Nichols tune, actually Don Cherry. Mal Waldron has been mentioned by a couple of the group.

Interesting stuff - I'm looking forward to finding out more. : 0 )

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Wow - I didn't remember that wild clarinet solo from the Perry Robinson album. I'll spin the whole thing tomorrow.

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So #9 is the Dirty Dozen Brass Band? I have seen them live and have other albums by them but I could not identify this one. I need to get this album by them.

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