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The Magnificent Goldberg

BFT 150 Discussion and apologies for the delay

65 posts in this topic

Sorry for the delay, folks - I thought it was October I was doing this, but Bill reminded me yesterday evening.

I'll send the material to Thom Keith in a couple of hours.

MG

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OK - the BFT folder is now with Thom Keith.

I'll change the title of this thread so people know it's for discussions, if anyone's talking to me still :)

MG

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We are still with you! I can't wait to hear what you have come up with!

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Track 1

"Sheik of Araby Boogie". Now who would that be by? Axel Zwingenberger? Well, it's not Albert Ammons!

Track 21

"There Will Never Be Another You". Gene Ammons?

Track 23

Jay McShann?

Edited by BillF

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Sorry Bill, zero correct answers so far. Title of #1 isn't even 'Sheik of Araby boogie" :)

But 21 is 'There will never be another ewe'. Not Jug, but a player fairly well known around these parts.

MG

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Nice to get both an Azure (18) and an Azure-Te (6) in one sitting.  With regard to the former, I would have thought perhaps a Wild Bill Davis ensemble, but so far I'm finding no evidence.  In fact I'm struggling to find much evidence of any ensemble recording of the tune with this instrumentation.  Oh well, I'm probably using the wrong search terms.  With regard to #6, that sounds like Louis Jordan.  I love it, and I don't think I own it (!).

Edited by Jim R

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10 hours ago, Jim R said:

Nice to get both an Azure (18) and an Azure-Te (6) in one sitting.  With regard to the former, I would have thought perhaps a Wild Bill Davis ensemble, but so far I'm finding no evidence.  In fact I'm struggling to find much evidence of any ensemble recording of the tune with this instrumentation.  Oh well, I'm probably using the wrong search terms.  With regard to #6, that sounds like Louis Jordan.  I love it, and I don't think I own it (!).

Yeah! BOINNNNNG!!!! First score to you Jim. #6 is indeed Louis Jordan. It was recorded about three months after Wild Bill Davis' original had been done and, of course, features Wild Bill too. I got my copy in the Louis Jordan Bear Family box. Expensive but worth every penny.

I thought people might guess Wild Bill Davis for #18. And it ain't. The correct version is researchable, however.

MG

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Okay, this is probably an odd little observation, but on #12... at the line "everything will be okay", the phrasing of the word "be" (and more so the tone of the voice right there) really really reminds me of Roy Brown.  But the rest of it doesn't sound like Roy, and it couldn't be Roy unless there's something weird happening here.  Okay, that was useless and pointless, but I had to say it anyway.  Now back to listening.

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I think I sort of lucked into figuring out #17.  The opening reminded me of the Basie band.  I knew who the vocalist was not (Joe Williams, for example), and I subconsciously knew that I have something of an inexplicable "hole" in my collection vis a vis a great singer who I knew to have collaborated with Basie- Arthur Prysock.  I do have the album they did together, but that's about all the Prysock I own.  When I checked on the song titles for that record, I noticed that "Close Your Eyes" was not on there.  This led me to checking Prysock's discography, which led to the discovery that this recording featured Prysock with the band of one Mort Garson... ? ...who I must admit I had never even heard of.  You learn something every day.  There's a Youtube video of Prysock singing this on American Bandstand, by the way, although it cuts off before the finish.

I still don't know who is singing on track 7 (haven't attempted any searches for this song title), but these lyrics are pretty hilarious- and I mean that in a good way.  :)  Very well played, as they say.

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Ok, some open time this evening and this is a buttload of tunes here, so let's see what we got here, with, of course, the usual thanks and disclaimers firmly in place...

TRACK ONE - don't know the tune exactly, but it sounds like it's got something to do with bells or clock or something judged by the intro and outro. Not sure if it's a "pure" boogie pianist as the left hand seems more accurate than functional. You got all kinds of possibilities here, ranging from an America cabaret type to somebody like Frankie carle or Freddie slack to some "European" entertained, all kinds of options. It's nicely played and guaranteed to bring a smile.

TRACK TWO - If this was a big band, it would be Maynard Ferguson, it's got that same kind of lack of pretension and simultaneous lack of depth, which is a charmingly winning combination, ok? Tenor player sounds like he/she has already played all those licks a gazillion times before, and this sounds to have been not that far into this type of thing, so, seasoned. A recurring "Move" reference. Red Prysock, maybe? Gator? Totally badass command of the instrument and the language. Totally show-biz to, but  to paraphrase the song There Were Such Things. It would be corny if it weren't so real!

TRACK THREE - geez, I know that voice...not Joe Carroll, or is it? Tight band, they've done this before.

TRACK FOUR - Opening guitar sounds like Freddie Robinson, which would allow for something from the late WorldPacificJazz/Chisa Crusaders transitional era, but as it turns out, Bob Crewe, Ben E. King, and...yeah, ok. Does not sound like Freddie Robinson as it goes on, can't tell what happened by the end, I didn't get that far. Sorry.

TRACK FIVE - I'd have preferred a vocal come in at some point, but that's just me.

TRACK SIX - Nice, "Azure Te". That's pretty. If it was designed to be a hit, I hope it was. I love it when good stuff finds a market.

TRACK SEVEN - NOT Happiness, NOT Joe. Let's get that straight up front. Easy enough to research, and glad to see that it's a singer I most always like, with All Time Pro All Purpose Baaaaad Man on tenor, composed by the Old Jazz Pimp himself. This disc is one to look for, I'm thinking.

TRACK EIGHT - some French or Cole Porter song, geez, I am forgetting more and more things these days. Is that Jimmy Forrest? Might be Budd again. Whoever it is, strong Bechet influence, this is a tune Bechet played a lot, right, why can't I recall the title...If you're gonna call on Bechet like this, you best be up to the task, because Bechet...Bechet was a stong man, that cat LED. No pussyfooting with Bechet, and this cat gets that, none of that weepy vibrato sentimentality like the weaksters call on, no, this cat GETS it. I like how the drummer leaves no doubt that this WILL be straight four RIGHT there, nobody go anywhere else, we are where we are going do be, do it HERE. And the tenor player sets that from jump, so we got a syndicate here, no bullshit, no ambiguity, not that ambiguity is bad, it's not, but it's not RIGHT for this kind of an expression. This shit is RIGHT.Those cats are playing. Five stars, Leonard, five in the pocket goddamn stars.

TRACK NINE - They too have done this before, maybe too often for the bari player's pleasure, but you never know. Sounds like everybody was getting paid well and that goes a long way.

TRACK TEN - Gotta be Big Maybelle. If not, that's just scary, that there could be another Big Maybelle. Not bad, just scary. The world can hold only so much of that, and yes, that's the world's problem, not Big Maybelle's. The world tried to fit it into Janis Joplin, which just goes to show you - never trust the world to do god's work, the world will always fuck it up. Always. And doing the research,...Valerie Simpson, really!!!! and Jo Armstead, her I don't know as well...so what is this Port label: https://www.discogs.com/label/184524-Port-Records looking at the 45 label there, looks like names upon names upon names, meaning that's where the money went before Big Maybelle got her little bit of pocket change...she sounds kinda tore down here, but getting tore down didn't mean shit to Big Maybelle, that kind of thing lives until it dies and then lives forever.

TRACK ELEVEN - "Old Country". Nat got paid, good for Nat. That almost sounds like Sammy Davis, Jr., which is not necessarily a bad thing. But almost is not does. That also almost sounds like either Bud Shank or Art Pepper on alto, but I don't know why it would be either. Would like to know who the engineer was, the drums are very soft but miked very well, excellent job. It's a familiar voice, known more for pop than jazz?, but again, I don't remember things like I used to. But I can see the body staging going on with every line, it's that kind of thing, presentational.

TRACK TWELVE - Ok, I was thinking pretty standard fare, but then that piano behind the tenor started splitting the time into another place, and whoa..."Get Rich Quick", "R&B" and whoa! ANOTHER song by the Old Jazz Pimp himself! Apart from that...had not heard all of these sessions, definitely not this one, and it confirms my belief that this guy was a real badass singer, never mind all the hoopla and stagecraft, the dude had a gift vocally. "Miss Ann" kinds hinted at it, but you can here it here, before he knew what it would mean to sound like him, if you know what I mean. So, is that with Johnny Otis' band?

TRACK THIRTEEN - That's just weird. Like, you keep your spirit up right until the day you die but you also be broke as hell and got no money but to play in the home with whatever they got there so ok kind of weird. That's not Lou Donaldson is it? God, I hope not. If these guys were worth recording, they were worth some better production than that. Or maybe the producer lived in the home with them and just had more bank. One never knows, do one?

TRACK FOURTEEN - WHOA! Brook! Did not know this record. That was a guy who transcended his backing, always. Gotta be a Mercury album. Funny story, kinda/maybe. A while back, I inherited the records of my wife's aunt on her father's side. She was from West Virginia, married a guy from West Virginia, settled into a comfortable-ish West Virginia lifestyle, then they moved to Florida (pre-retirement) and lived out life there. They were not at all "musically sophisticated people", and their record collection reflected that, but damn did they have some Brook Benton records, Brook Benton & Lloyd Price (ABC stuff), for some reason those tow voices resonated with them. A record like this is a window into why, maybe. The beat is real, the layering cheesey as hell (Prima-shuffle un-Wild-ed) but not creepy, not at all, and on top of it all, Brook just wiggles all up and down and inside that shit, not oozing, mind you, not that liquid, but wiggling. I was surprised to see how many standards Brook Benton recorded, a lot of them, actually. But that's a weird splice in there, what happened? And if not Brook Benton, ok, never mind.

TRACK FIFTEEN - "Among My Souvenirs", as they let you know. Funny how they're going for that Billie/Lester vibe, and they get the vibe, but the time is not the same, it dances but it doesn't float. No problem with that, it's a god rendition, just an observation, maybe that magic is magic because if everybody, or even many, could do it, it wouldn't be magic.

AH! - It's A Lonesome Old Town, that's TRACK EIGHT, finally came to me. That's not French or Cole Porter, what was the guy's name, Ben Barney, Barnie, Barnacle Bill The Barney Fife & Drum Corps Principle's Office Space Program Notes To You (re:Abe Most), whoever the hell, like I said, I don't remember like I used to, I just follow the words wherever they go. Found it, Sam The Man, alright no wonder, hell yeah, that's how you do it, for real. That is now my favorite version of this song, at least for now. Kinda hard to top Sinatra's, but that's a whole other thing, and there is room at the top for anything that can make it there. And that one does. So, is that a Japanese band? Please tell me that it is, that would be perfect, either that or somebody who hired Sonny Greer.

TRACK SIXTEEN - Not hard to research, all those Tangerine 45s out there, how many? Some are freaking spectacular, some merely excellent, all of them carrying the scent of a write-off, as did most things Tangerine, but, that's how the business used to run, and assuming that people got paid session fees, everybody, band, copyist, singers, etc, cash the check now, worry later. Archaeologists, have fun! I was halfway expecting this to be Dorothy Morrison (by the voice, not the gig), but who was Vernita Moss?

TRACK SEVENTEEN - MORE REVERB THAN GOD! Wait, that IS God...at least the voice. That stuttering alto lick, that's a Jerome Richardson specialty. If this was done on Old Town, good luck on getting personnel lsitings, but the odds are good. I went on an Arthur Prysock bender at Dusty Groove a year or two ago and bought everything they had, everything. All at once, just paid however much and said send it here. Spent about a week reveling in it all, a few things maybe not really in there. but jeesus, so much of it was, DEEP in there. Songs sung so clearly you can understand every emotion, some of the best singing of these songs that ANYBODY'S done, you have my word, internet. So, hello god, y'all don't need that much reverb, but I get that you gotta sound good an AM radio. Mort Garson made some some funny moves from time to time, but when he got it right, whoa, just give the man a song, a tempo, and let god do the rest, god got it from there. And yeah, this one here IS the voice of god: https://www.discogs.com/Arthur-Prysock-Intimately-Yours/release/2002585 Anybody so inclined needs to get all of that one. And this one: https://www.discogs.com/Arthur-Prysock-Mister-Prysock/release/2534243 If Billy Eckstine finally got crushed by trying to go where he was never going to be welcome, Arthur Prysock knew where home was and enriched it deeply, lovingly, and beatutifully.

TRACK EIGHTEEN - "Azure"...research shows Earl Grant, and who was in that band? I still have not really investigated Earl Grant, bad adolescent memories of EZListening Radio moments, but you keep pointing out things that are marvelously not that.

TRACK NINETEEN - Had to do some digging, but...Gloria Lynne. Sweet. Billy, not T-Bone got paid, hopefully.

TRACK TWENTY - Ok, George, what record was this? Fatback Band, ok. so this is what Perception did besides Johnny Hartman, Larence Of Newark, & Dizzy/Moody records, eh? Quite an ambitious label it seems. To be honest, without George, I don't think I'm in. But, George, so no choice but to be in.

TRACK TWENTY-ONE - Oh hell yeah. I have this record, almost put this cut on one of my earliest BFTs, thanks for finally getting it in here. Red, and not Holloway, Red not white, but deep blue, Red, the brother of the god of track 17, between this guy and Rusty Bryant, imagine how many nights of THIS will never be known except to those who were there, which the more I think about it, might well have been the point/intent/etc.

TRACK TWENTY-TWO - This is good, is there any historicals of note, or is it just good? Either way works the first time through.

TRACK TWWNTY-THREEEEEEEEEEEEEEE - Jacquet? On both alto and tenor? Kinda sounds like Basie, kinda not. Not sure if they'd all play that way if there weren't civilians in the room. Up to a point, yeah, but not all this like that.

Damn, dude, that's a lot of tunes, a lot of tracks, a lot of cuts, 23 skidoopopadashebamaklookamopmop, as they say. Most of it I liked, and a few things are finders (and then keepers). Nothing except the Ben E. King thing was less than at least somewhat pleasurable, and the aces were doubled down into spades AND plowshare, so lay down sally, let's eat the lamb.

Onward!

 

 

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7 hours ago, Jim R said:

I think I sort of lucked into figuring out #17.  The opening reminded me of the Basie band.  I knew who the vocalist was not (Joe Williams, for example), and I subconsciously knew that I have something of an inexplicable "hole" in my collection vis a vis a great singer who I knew to have collaborated with Basie- Arthur Prysock.  I do have the album they did together, but that's about all the Prysock I own.  When I checked on the song titles for that record, I noticed that "Close Your Eyes" was not on there.  This led me to checking Prysock's discography, which led to the discovery that this recording featured Prysock with the band of one Mort Garson... ? ...who I must admit I had never even heard of.  You learn something every day.  There's a Youtube video of Prysock singing this on American Bandstand, by the way, although it cuts off before the finish.

I still don't know who is singing on track 7 (haven't attempted any searches for this song title), but these lyrics are pretty hilarious- and I mean that in a good way.  :)  Very well played, as they say.

BOINGGGG!!!! You're right about #17, Jim. Yeah, the backing is VERY Basie-ish. It's from the Old Town album 'Everlasting songs for everlasting lovers'.

No luck with #12, I see. It's a little while since I listened to my Roy Brown, but the connection on the way they pronounce words never got me. There's more of a connection in terms of both being 'mighty, mighty men', as it were. You should recognise the bandleader and tenor player, who is VERY well known around these parts.

MG

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3 hours ago, JSngry said:

Ok, some open time this evening and this is a buttload of tunes here, so let's see what we got here, with, of course, the usual thanks and disclaimers firmly in place...

TRACK ONE - don't know the tune exactly, but it sounds like it's got something to do with bells or clock or something judged by the intro and outro. Not sure if it's a "pure" boogie pianist as the left hand seems more accurate than functional. You got all kinds of possibilities here, ranging from an America cabaret type to somebody like Frankie carle or Freddie slack to some "European" entertained, all kinds of options. It's nicely played and guaranteed to bring a smile.

TRACK TWO - If this was a big band, it would be Maynard Ferguson, it's got that same kind of lack of pretension and simultaneous lack of depth, which is a charmingly winning combination, ok? Tenor player sounds like he/she has already played all those licks a gazillion times before, and this sounds to have been not that far into this type of thing, so, seasoned. A recurring "Move" reference. Red Prysock, maybe? Gator? Totally badass command of the instrument and the language. Totally show-biz to, but  to paraphrase the song There Were Such Things. It would be corny if it weren't so real!

TRACK THREE - geez, I know that voice...not Joe Carroll, or is it? Tight band, they've done this before.

TRACK FOUR - Opening guitar sounds like Freddie Robinson, which would allow for something from the late WorldPacificJazz/Chisa Crusaders transitional era, but as it turns out, Bob Crewe, Ben E. King, and...yeah, ok. Does not sound like Freddie Robinson as it goes on, can't tell what happened by the end, I didn't get that far. Sorry.

TRACK FIVE - I'd have preferred a vocal come in at some point, but that's just me.

TRACK SIX - Nice, "Azure Te". That's pretty. If it was designed to be a hit, I hope it was. I love it when good stuff finds a market.

TRACK SEVEN - NOT Happiness, NOT Joe. Let's get that straight up front. Easy enough to research, and glad to see that it's a singer I most always like, with All Time Pro All Purpose Baaaaad Man on tenor, composed by the Old Jazz Pimp himself. This disc is one to look for, I'm thinking.

TRACK EIGHT - some French or Cole Porter song, geez, I am forgetting more and more things these days. Is that Jimmy Forrest? Might be Budd again. Whoever it is, strong Bechet influence, this is a tune Bechet played a lot, right, why can't I recall the title...If you're gonna call on Bechet like this, you best be up to the task, because Bechet...Bechet was a stong man, that cat LED. No pussyfooting with Bechet, and this cat gets that, none of that weepy vibrato sentimentality like the weaksters call on, no, this cat GETS it. I like how the drummer leaves no doubt that this WILL be straight four RIGHT there, nobody go anywhere else, we are where we are going do be, do it HERE. And the tenor player sets that from jump, so we got a syndicate here, no bullshit, no ambiguity, not that ambiguity is bad, it's not, but it's not RIGHT for this kind of an expression. This shit is RIGHT.Those cats are playing. Five stars, Leonard, five in the pocket goddamn stars.

TRACK NINE - They too have done this before, maybe too often for the bari player's pleasure, but you never know. Sounds like everybody was getting paid well and that goes a long way.

TRACK TEN - Gotta be Big Maybelle. If not, that's just scary, that there could be another Big Maybelle. Not bad, just scary. The world can hold only so much of that, and yes, that's the world's problem, not Big Maybelle's. The world tried to fit it into Janis Joplin, which just goes to show you - never trust the world to do god's work, the world will always fuck it up. Always. And doing the research,...Valerie Simpson, really!!!! and Jo Armstead, her I don't know as well...so what is this Port label: https://www.discogs.com/label/184524-Port-Records looking at the 45 label there, looks like names upon names upon names, meaning that's where the money went before Big Maybelle got her little bit of pocket change...she sounds kinda tore down here, but getting tore down didn't mean shit to Big Maybelle, that kind of thing lives until it dies and then lives forever.

TRACK ELEVEN - "Old Country". Nat got paid, good for Nat. That almost sounds like Sammy Davis, Jr., which is not necessarily a bad thing. But almost is not does. That also almost sounds like either Bud Shank or Art Pepper on alto, but I don't know why it would be either. Would like to know who the engineer was, the drums are very soft but miked very well, excellent job. It's a familiar voice, known more for pop than jazz?, but again, I don't remember things like I used to. But I can see the body staging going on with every line, it's that kind of thing, presentational.

TRACK TWELVE - Ok, I was thinking pretty standard fare, but then that piano behind the tenor started splitting the time into another place, and whoa..."Get Rich Quick", "R&B" and whoa! ANOTHER song by the Old Jazz Pimp himself! Apart from that...had not heard all of these sessions, definitely not this one, and it confirms my belief that this guy was a real badass singer, never mind all the hoopla and stagecraft, the dude had a gift vocally. "Miss Ann" kinds hinted at it, but you can here it here, before he knew what it would mean to sound like him, if you know what I mean. So, is that with Johnny Otis' band?

TRACK THIRTEEN - That's just weird. Like, you keep your spirit up right until the day you die but you also be broke as hell and got no money but to play in the home with whatever they got there so ok kind of weird. That's not Lou Donaldson is it? God, I hope not. If these guys were worth recording, they were worth some better production than that. Or maybe the producer lived in the home with them and just had more bank. One never knows, do one?

TRACK FOURTEEN - WHOA! Brook! Did not know this record. That was a guy who transcended his backing, always. Gotta be a Mercury album. Funny story, kinda/maybe. A while back, I inherited the records of my wife's aunt on her father's side. She was from West Virginia, married a guy from West Virginia, settled into a comfortable-ish West Virginia lifestyle, then they moved to Florida (pre-retirement) and lived out life there. They were not at all "musically sophisticated people", and their record collection reflected that, but damn did they have some Brook Benton records, Brook Benton & Lloyd Price (ABC stuff), for some reason those tow voices resonated with them. A record like this is a window into why, maybe. The beat is real, the layering cheesey as hell (Prima-shuffle un-Wild-ed) but not creepy, not at all, and on top of it all, Brook just wiggles all up and down and inside that shit, not oozing, mind you, not that liquid, but wiggling. I was surprised to see how many standards Brook Benton recorded, a lot of them, actually. But that's a weird splice in there, what happened? And if not Brook Benton, ok, never mind.

TRACK FIFTEEN - "Among My Souvenirs", as they let you know. Funny how they're going for that Billie/Lester vibe, and they get the vibe, but the time is not the same, it dances but it doesn't float. No problem with that, it's a god rendition, just an observation, maybe that magic is magic because if everybody, or even many, could do it, it wouldn't be magic.

AH! - It's A Lonesome Old Town, that's TRACK EIGHT, finally came to me. That's not French or Cole Porter, what was the guy's name, Ben Barney, Barnie, Barnacle Bill The Barney Fife & Drum Corps Principle's Office Space Program Notes To You (re:Abe Most), whoever the hell, like I said, I don't remember like I used to, I just follow the words wherever they go. Found it, Sam The Man, alright no wonder, hell yeah, that's how you do it, for real. That is now my favorite version of this song, at least for now. Kinda hard to top Sinatra's, but that's a whole other thing, and there is room at the top for anything that can make it there. And that one does. So, is that a Japanese band? Please tell me that it is, that would be perfect, either that or somebody who hired Sonny Greer.

TRACK SIXTEEN - Not hard to research, all those Tangerine 45s out there, how many? Some are freaking spectacular, some merely excellent, all of them carrying the scent of a write-off, as did most things Tangerine, but, that's how the business used to run, and assuming that people got paid session fees, everybody, band, copyist, singers, etc, cash the check now, worry later. Archaeologists, have fun! I was halfway expecting this to be Dorothy Morrison (by the voice, not the gig), but who was Vernita Moss?

TRACK SEVENTEEN - MORE REVERB THAN GOD! Wait, that IS God...at least the voice. That stuttering alto lick, that's a Jerome Richardson specialty. If this was done on Old Town, good luck on getting personnel lsitings, but the odds are good. I went on an Arthur Prysock bender at Dusty Groove a year or two ago and bought everything they had, everything. All at once, just paid however much and said send it here. Spent about a week reveling in it all, a few things maybe not really in there. but jeesus, so much of it was, DEEP in there. Songs sung so clearly you can understand every emotion, some of the best singing of these songs that ANYBODY'S done, you have my word, internet. So, hello god, y'all don't need that much reverb, but I get that you gotta sound good an AM radio. Mort Garson made some some funny moves from time to time, but when he got it right, whoa, just give the man a song, a tempo, and let god do the rest, god got it from there. And yeah, this one here IS the voice of god: https://www.discogs.com/Arthur-Prysock-Intimately-Yours/release/2002585 Anybody so inclined needs to get all of that one. And this one: https://www.discogs.com/Arthur-Prysock-Mister-Prysock/release/2534243 If Billy Eckstine finally got crushed by trying to go where he was never going to be welcome, Arthur Prysock knew where home was and enriched it deeply, lovingly, and beatutifully.

TRACK EIGHTEEN - "Azure"...research shows Earl Grant, and who was in that band? I still have not really investigated Earl Grant, bad adolescent memories of EZListening Radio moments, but you keep pointing out things that are marvelously not that.

TRACK NINETEEN - Had to do some digging, but...Gloria Lynne. Sweet. Billy, not T-Bone got paid, hopefully.

TRACK TWENTY - Ok, George, what record was this? Fatback Band, ok. so this is what Perception did besides Johnny Hartman, Larence Of Newark, & Dizzy/Moody records, eh? Quite an ambitious label it seems. To be honest, without George, I don't think I'm in. But, George, so no choice but to be in.

TRACK TWENTY-ONE - Oh hell yeah. I have this record, almost put this cut on one of my earliest BFTs, thanks for finally getting it in here. Red, and not Holloway, Red not white, but deep blue, Red, the brother of the god of track 17, between this guy and Rusty Bryant, imagine how many nights of THIS will never be known except to those who were there, which the more I think about it, might well have been the point/intent/etc.

TRACK TWENTY-TWO - This is good, is there any historicals of note, or is it just good? Either way works the first time through.

TRACK TWWNTY-THREEEEEEEEEEEEEEE - Jacquet? On both alto and tenor? Kinda sounds like Basie, kinda not. Not sure if they'd all play that way if there weren't civilians in the room. Up to a point, yeah, but not all this like that.

Damn, dude, that's a lot of tunes, a lot of tracks, a lot of cuts, 23 skidoopopadashebamaklookamopmop, as they say. Most of it I liked, and a few things are finders (and then keepers). Nothing except the Ben E. King thing was less than at least somewhat pleasurable, and the aces were doubled down into spades AND plowshare, so lay down sally, let's eat the lamb.

Onward!

 

 

Phew! Lotta stuff you said there, Jim. Gonna do it in instalments... well, maybe.

BOINGGGG!!! Starting with the correct answers, anyway, so people aren't kept in suspense.

2 Yes, one of your guesses hits the mark. It's Gator; 'Y'all' from the album 'Loose', and if anyone sez it's not like what I understand as being that tune, and it ain't from that album, 'cos I've got the CD, well, it IS from that LP, but never put on CD. The earlier tune of that name - a different one - was on the Willis Jackson & Johnny Hammond Smith album.

4 Yes, it's Ben E King. Sorry you don't like this; I do :)

7 Yes, that's Etta Jones.

8 Yeah, you got it eventually. And I don't know what band it was, because MGM didn't give a shit about lounge music and never told us. But it's been released twice; first, in 1962, on an album called 'Mist of the Orient', then it was called 'Sam Taylor in Tokyo', so you COULD be right about the Japanese band. Who knows? WERE there Japanese bands who could have played this in '62? Oh and the whole LP is WELL worth finding and listening to; this track weren't a fluke.

12 You got Little RIchard, too. It's not the Otis band - those cuts were done later for Peacock. This was from his first session, done in Atlanta for RCA Victor, and the bandleader, tenor player and, presumably, arranger, was the greatest jazz musician of all time, as my mate wrote on the wall of one of Dobells  listening booths - Fred Jackson.

16 "who was Vernita Moss?" you said. Who indeed? As far as I can identify, this is the only cut on which she sang lead. It's from 1971.

17 Yes, it's Arthur Prysock, but I am slightly confused because it doesn't come from either of those albums you referenced.

18 Another Yes. Glad to be introducing you to Earl Grant so nicely. See if you can find the 45 of 'Sweet sixteen bars' - I don't think it was ever on an LP. One of my greatest mistakes was getting rid of mine.

19 Yes, Gloria Lynne. And the song is credited to Crowder, Eckstine, Hines, not Walker. Do you know who the players are?

20 I didn't think even you would get this. Yeah, it's George Adams playing with the Fatback Band. It is, by the way, the only track on which he solos. But THIS!

21 Yes to Red Prysock.

Bloomin' 'eck, that's eleven correct answers.

More comments later.

MG

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OK, time for a few comments on Jim's post.

3 Yes, I think you probably DO know this singer; but a fair bit later and in a rather different context. Sleeve notes don't say who was in the band, but I thought of Pepper and Shank, too. It IS an LA production, as I guess you could tell from the sound.

6 Jim R already got this one.

10 I do hope you don't rush outside and dive under a bus when you find out who this one actually WAS. I am CERTAIN you know this singer.

14 Brook Benton is a good, but inaccurate guess. Actually, Brook is one of the people SERIOUSLY missing from my collection. Always has been, dunno why. Bought one single back in '61 or so and loved it, though I flogged it eventually. Never bought anything else.

22 No historicals of note. This is just YET ANOTHER very excellent record from a very good pianist, who should probably be revered more than he is.

23 What do you mean civilians, Jim? Non-musicians? I don't understand. Or maybe I do, but don't want to think it out loud.

MG

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10 is Big Maybelle, right? Those other people were the songwriters.

Civilians just means paying customrrs. It's an old, old term.

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Sorry, didn't understand. This is not a song written by either of them. And it's not sung by Big Maybelle, either. If memory serves, Valerie Simpson was a sixties/seventies songwriter. This song is a good bit older than that.

MG

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The 45 gives them both as songwriters, though.

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Yeah, no doubt. But it's not the song on the BFT, Jim. That's a different song, sung by someone else you should be equally familiar with. And I'll bet you've got recordings of the same song by other people. It's from the Benny Goodman band book.

MG

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Oh shit, I see what I've done. Not Big Maybelle, Big Mama Thornton. I stand by the rest of the post, except the songwriting part.

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Not Big Mama Thornton, either. And you WON'T say it's weird when you find out who it really is, so you won't stand by that part of the post :)

MG

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I told you, I don't remember like i used to....

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Correction - it's not from the Goodman book, it's from the Isham Jones band book and was also a Herman item. I don't remember like I used to, either :) 

MG

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Taking no personal credit for this, but I got some homies...we have two Gene Mc Daniels performances on this BFT, correct?

So I guess RosettaTharpe, then? Honestly, a little of her goes a long way for me, unlike my first two guesses. 

Gotta get that Gene McDaniels/Marty Paitch record, I had noooooo idea.

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Oh yeah, you could hide Fatback Band, but there is no hiding George Adams!!!!

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OK. 14, if not Brook Benton...The feel of the strings is very Nelson Riddle-ish, theway they ease into the sound rather than attack it head on. So I wwould think Capitol records and...Ed Townsend just as a guess, but that does not return any results. More work to do on this one.

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