bluemonk

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About bluemonk

  • Rank
    Groover
  • Birthday 01/07/1973

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  • Gender Male
  • Interests I really dig bebop. That's probably my favorite jazz style, but I really like all kinds of jazz just as long as it's not too crazy.<br /><br />Other interests: art, writing, television, film, animals, basketball, tennis, among other things...
  1. What album turned G. Benson over to the dark side?

    If you've said the same thing yourself, then why the hell are you telling me what I should say and should not say? Sounds like you need to follow your own advise.
  2. The guitar corner

    WHATEVER....you're opinion and that's all it is.
  3. What album turned G. Benson over to the dark side?

    As I said before, I don't like him and I'm just going to leave it at that.
  4. What album turned G. Benson over to the dark side?

    Well now. Tell us how you really feel. Being a sellout would imply that he's doing it only for the money. History says otherwise. So he's not doing it for the money? I think you're way off base here, Jim. Everything he does is motivated by money. It has to be. Listen to his music. It sucks! I do things that are motivated by money, too. Does that mean I'm a sellout? You do what you can do to make a living; he found something he was good at and could make money at and he stuck with it and made a whole bunch of bread. Good for him. It's obvious from bootlegs that I've heard and from the stories of people in this thread that he can still burn on guitar in a jazz setting. Does that mean he is required to do so by some strange obligation to jazz / guitar nerds? And if he doesn't he sucks? The music business is extremely tough. I applaud anyone who actually has talent and musicianship for making it, however they can. Is Larry Goldings selling out because he's touring and recording with James Taylor? You know you're right, Jim. Benson has no obligation to anybody. People like his music and hey if you're cool with him singing "On Broadway," then who cares what others think, right? Enjoy his crappy music. I told people on here what I thought about him, so take it or leave it. I'm just expressing my opinion, and that's all it is, an opinion.
  5. What album turned G. Benson over to the dark side?

    Being a sellout would imply that he's doing it only for the money. History says otherwise. So he's not doing it for the money? I think you're way off base here, Jim. Everything he does is motivated by money. It has to be. Listen to his music. It sucks!
  6. What album turned G. Benson over to the dark side?

    George Benson can kiss my ass! I hate him and his music.
  7. What album turned G. Benson over to the dark side?

    Sorry, but his music is like Top 40 Radio minus the vocals. He might have been able to swing at one time, but he gets my vote for biggest sellout in jazz history.
  8. AOTW May 10-16 Kenny Wheeler

    For me, Angel Song was the recording that made me appreciate Wheeler's music much more. I think it is his best recording. You have such a wonderful cast of musicians each being completely empathic with each other and the music. The interplay between them all is really astounding. I also find It Takes Two! to be quite good too. Gotta love the two guitar lineup of John Abercrombie and John Parricelli and the bass playing of Anders Jormin.
  9. Stanley Crouch

    Stanley Crouch has caused more destruction in jazz than Kenny G. Crouch, as far as I'm concerned, has always been an enemy of this music. He is the epitome of the words "jazz purist." Everyone who listens to jazz knows it has progressed. I don't need a damn pinhead like Crouch, or any other jazz critic for that matter, telling me otherwise.
  10. Dave Easley

    Don't worry about it, Jim! I like yours and Dave's playing a lot. I went on your website and am very impressed with what you had to say...musically.
  11. Arthur Blythe

    Another album that doesn't get mentioned much is McCoy Tyner's "4 X 4." It has Arthur Blythe on it, Freddie Hubbard, John Abercrombie, Bobby Hutcherson, Al Foster, and Cecil McBee. Very good session.
  12. Arthur Blythe

    I liked Arthur Blythe's work on the two Joey Baron recordings "Down Home" and "We'll Soon Find Out." Great, great albums! Bill Frisell - guitar Arthur Blythe - saxophone Ron Carter - bass Joey Baron - drums
  13. Arthur Blythe

    Don't forget Henry Threadgill. Those guys like David Murray, Arthur Blythe, Julius Hemphill, and Threadgill definitely moved the music forward into unchartered territories.
  14. If I can bring a box set it would be "The Complete Verve Master Takes," but if had to choose one it would be "Bird & Diz."
  15. Any new guitarist on the scene worth listen to.

    Well, I certainly am not afraid to explore the electric guitar's potential. I've been playing for 18 years and I've always been fascinated by the electric guitar. Whether it be effects, amplifiers, guitar synthesizers, I'm pretty adventurous, but that all changed many years ago when I heard Jim Hall for the first time and my mind was blown. Hall has such a simple sound, but is beautiful in its sparity of effects. He might have a little reverb, but that's it. Hall has finally through the years picked up a few pedals like a Digitech Whammy pedal and a few others. It's interesting that he refused effects for so long, but now I think they can help you create your own sound. When you hear guys like Hall stomp on an effects pedal, it's refreshing, because people don't usually associate him with anything but a guitar and amplifier. I think effects are crucial to my own sound, but I don't go overboard with them. Reverb, delay, and sometimes distortion is all I really need.