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Hot Ptah

BFT 69: Listen and Discuss

174 posts in this topic

Hmm... funny that MG and I both linked to the same Booker album. (I didn't check his link before I posted mine.)

As for that trumpet skronk, I have other thoughts, but have to take a little more time before I commit. I really like the Booker cut, so would definitely like to get a copy of whatever album it's from.

The brass band "Saints..." with rap is harder than I'd initially thought it might be, too - none of the usuals (Rebirth, Dirty Dozen, Tremé, etc. - or even bands that aren't from there, like Youngblood).

Edited by seeline

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I've tried my best to avoid reading anything else in this thread until I had listened to part 2, but it was tough - it kept showing up when I clicked "view new posts." I did glance at enough to see that someone has identified the Skatallites track, but I managed to restrain myself otherwise. Here's part 2 for me:

1. George Russell – “Living Time, Event V” from the New York Big Band album. I love Russell, but this album is not one of my favorites. Stanley Cowell is the pianist. Interesting piece – the best part is the amazing out-of-tempo opening section. But George had some tricks up his sleeve. Just when you start thinking that the piece had gotten too conventional, he builds up to all that wild trumpet stuff. Pretty cool.

That is exactly right, as to artist, album and song. You are SO good at this game!

2. My favorite cut from Hi-Bop Ska by the Skatallites with guest David Murray – “Flowers for Albert.” Love the Skatallites, and this tune fits them well. I’ve heard Murray play this tune solo and with the Octet – it can be joyous or elegiac.

3. Good musicians and nice enough piece, but nothing I need to hear again. The composition has vaguely Corean overtones, but I don’t know who it is.

4. “Ghost of a Chance” by some really nice swing-era piano player – maybe Teddy Wilson, although the touch seems a little heavy for him. I’m amazed at how the touch and timing of the ascending runs (like at the end) sounds like Thelonious Monk when he did similar licks. This is excellent music.

That is correct as to the song and Teddy Wilson, but which album?

5. Another really good track that I don’t know. Good solos and group interaction, and the clarinetist is masterful – Don Byron, maybe. I’m guessing it’s the pianist’s date, since he gets the lion’s share of solo space. Like I say, I don’t know who it is, but this is really good.

It's Don Byron on clarinet. But who is the pianist and what is the album?

6. “Reincarnation of a Lovebird” played by – I don’t really know. Sounds like Bill Frisell on guitar, but then again, he spawned lots of imitators. This is an unusual interpretation - really beautiful, although I’m not sure about the eccentric stuff near the end.

It's Frisell. Who is the clarinetist? There is a good explanation for the eccentric stuff near the end.

7. Cool stuff – I like the middle Eastern influence. I do think it goes on a little long, even with the changes that occur. And once again, I have no idea who it is. Another excellent clarinetist.

8. I’m not familiar enough with this kind of stuff to even venture a guess. It’s very well-done and enjoyable, though.

9. This drove me crazy! I knew it was something I was familiar with – probably in my collection - and I recognized Fletcher Henderson’s band and the soloists: Dickie Wells, Red Allen, Coleman Hawkins, and Buster Bailey (I thought), but I couldn’t remember what the tune was. Then I remembered that odd session the Henderson band recorded under brother Horace Henderson’s name for a British label and pulled out the CD. Yep, it’s “Minnie the Moocher’s Wedding Day.” Pretty good little early swing tune. And I see that I was wrong about the clarinetist. I hate the fake stereo mastering on the issue you used, the CD I have sounds much better.

Yes, that's the song and artists. Which CD issue do you have? I want to get it as I love this recording.

10. Pretty good tenor player in what is, in my opinion, a pretty silly context.

11. Somber and excellent. I heard a little of “Summertime” in there. No ideas as to who it could be.

12. The great James Booker from The Lost Paramount Tapes. Booker is one of my heroes , and one of the few R & B musicians I would classify as a genius. There are times, like near the end of this track, where it sounds like he has three hands, at least. Among the other pleasures of this cut is Jessie Hill’s two-tambourine style – funky, funky, funky. I regret that I didn’t visit New Orleans for the first time until after Booker was dead. I prefer Booker solo, but this is still great. Thanks!

Wow. I am really impressed with your abilities here. It is "The Lost Paramount Tapes", which I ordered by mail from a store in New Orleans. I have never seen a copy in a store.

albumcoverjamesbookerthelostparamounttapes.jpg

13. This is the Coolbone Brass Band from the Brass-Hop album. Ironically, it’s way less funky than if they had just used a second-line street beat. Almost any NOLA brass band is worth hearing, but this ain’t my favorite. The Rebirth or the L’il Rascals playing “Saints” would eat these guys up.

Absolutely correct. Go to the head of the class. I actually have this on the "Doctors Professors Kings and Queens" box set of New Orleans music.

gototheheadoftheclass.jpg

14. More bourbon in the eggnog, please.

Whew! Let me go back and read the rest of the thread, now.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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I don't think this is right, but I'll give it a shot:

Disc One, tk. 5 might be Mary Lou Williams, although Jaki Byard and Roland Hanna both come to mind - and I'm not sure why!

There are some chord voicings on this cut that I don't think would be used by people like Willie The Lion... too "modernistic," i think. But I dont think MLW did that doubling thing (in octaves) very much, unless she was demo'ing older styles.

Edited by seeline

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I don't think this is right, but I'll give it a shot:

Disc One, tk. 5 might be Mary Lou Williams, although Jaki Byard and Roland Hanna both come to mind - and I'm not sure why!

There are some chord voicings on this cut that I don't think would be used by people like Willie The Lion... too "modernistic," i think.

None of those guesses are correct.

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I don't think this is right, but I'll give it a shot:

Disc One, tk. 5 might be Mary Lou Williams, although Jaki Byard and Roland Hanna both come to mind - and I'm not sure why!

There are some chord voicings on this cut that I don't think would be used by people like Willie The Lion... too "modernistic," i think.

None of those guesses are correct.

Yeah... and see my adds. This has me thinking - for whatever reason - that someone is playing "in the style of," but I can't pin it down. (Nick Brignola was very good at doing brief imitations "in the style of," which is what made me think of that whole idea...)

Edited to add: Coolbone! Makes complete sense!

Disc 2, tk. 5 - if Don Byron, it might be Uri Caine. maybe from a JMT release? Or it could be Edsel Gomez...

Edited by seeline

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OK, onward into Disc Two...

1 First there are some cliches from post-WWII serious music. Then a piano solo that sounds like Ramsey Lewis, over an uncommonly interesting arrangement. Then the brass episode raises the weirdness quotient. Some excited tenor. Then the last couple of minutes are surprisingly cool. Somebody explain this one to me.

See Jeff's correct answer.

2 Quick recognition of the tune itself and the tenor solo by its composer. But I haven’t heard this version before. In fact, if I had a band, we’d play this tune, but not like this. Sounds like the rhythm section hasn’t grown into the concept yet. So often in Caribbean grooves, rhythm sections seem to turn on the cruise control.

This is the Skatalites, who originated the entire concept, or were among those who did.

3 Maybe this is from that afternoon Hubert Laws spent over at Deodato’s house. Then again, maybe the Lew Tabackin suggestion is correct (it’s that big vibrato).

4 Well, it sure sounds like Teddy. Exactly like Teddy. So I go to my Teddy records to nail down this

“Ghost of a Chance,” and I can’t. Grrr.

5 HP, I hate you! This is one of those tunes that I’ve been carrying around in my head for years that I can’t identify! Quit reading my brain like this! I’ve heard this record, I own this record -- but I can’t trace it. Probably Don Byron on clarinet, Ralph Peterson or maybe Tain on drums. Please help me get this one out of my head!

It is Byron and Ralph Peterson on drums. Who is the pianist? Which song on which album?

6 Something from a Frisell-Byron collaboration, I think. But I’m probably walking into your trap here.

It is Frisell and Don Byron. Which album?

7 It’s klezmerific. Lots of writing here, and not much improvisation. Something Paul Schoenfeld cooked up? Or something Zorn cooked up on a day when he wished he was Paul Schoenfeld? I envy the clarinetist’s control, and the violinist and tubist ain’t to be sneezed at either. The writing is in the shadow of Stravinsky’s “Histoire du Soldat.” 10:15

8 OK, I’ll mambo. Great stuff from the Land of Extreme Stereo Separation. As someone said, “Mono was like the sound escaping from a closet. Early stereo was two closets.” No guesses other than the usual Tito P., Machito, Tito Rodriguez.

9 Electronically re-processed for stereo. And that sucks some life out of it. I should know the tune but I don’t. Every one of the solos escapes the feeling of routine. I’ll guess Fletcher, because the trumpet reminds me of Red Allen, and the tenor does a fine Ben Webster.

10 Do not adjust your set. Some really, deeply, profoundly beautiful drumming in there – I hope it isn’t a sample. A nice tenor burst. The tenorist keeps reminding me of Sam Rivers, no kidding. I have no idea what it is. I kinda like.

11 After about three minutes, it settles loosely into “Summertime.” Maybe a certain Badger bassist whom you sometimes talk about, HP?

Bucky_Badger.jpg

More to come. I haven’t listened to those last three tunes yet.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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I don't think this is right, but I'll give it a shot:

Disc One, tk. 5 might be Mary Lou Williams, although Jaki Byard and Roland Hanna both come to mind - and I'm not sure why!

There are some chord voicings on this cut that I don't think would be used by people like Willie The Lion... too "modernistic," i think.

None of those guesses are correct.

Yeah... and see my adds. This has me thinking - for whatever reason - that someone is playing "in the style of," but I can't pin it down. (Nick Brignola was very good at doing brief imitations "in the style of," which is what made me think of that whole idea...)

Edited to add: Coolbone! Makes complete sense!

Disc 2, tk. 5 - if Don Byron, it might be Uri Caine. maybe from a JMT release?

It is Uri Caine on piano on Disc 2, Track 5. Which album and song?

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It is Uri Caine on piano on Disc 2, Track 5. Which album and song?

You got me! None of the discs I've been thinking of... not even discs by Uri, though I could be wrong there. (I'm not that familiar with his

work.)

Edited to add: OK - Disc Two, tk. 6 reminds me of "Basquiat" from Don's album Romance with the Unseen.

Edited by seeline

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Disc Two, tk. 5 - "Mr. B.C.," from Sphere Music (I think!) Originally issued on JMT. Ralph Peterson kills!

415W4AR1T0L._SL500_AA130_.gif

I could kick myself for having sold this album...

Edited by seeline

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Disc Two, tk. 5 - "Mr. B.C.," from Sphere Music (I think!) Originally issued on JMT. Ralph Peterson kills!

415W4AR1T0L._SL500_AA130_.gif

I could kick myself for having sold this album...

That is all correct. You win this:

a-trophy.gif

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9. This drove me crazy! I knew it was something I was familiar with – probably in my collection - and I recognized Fletcher Henderson’s band and the soloists: Dickie Wells, Red Allen, Coleman Hawkins, and Buster Bailey (I thought), but I couldn’t remember what the tune was. Then I remembered that odd session the Henderson band recorded under brother Horace Henderson’s name for a British label and pulled out the CD. Yep, it’s “Minnie the Moocher’s Wedding Day.” Pretty good little early swing tune. And I see that I was wrong about the clarinetist. I hate the fake stereo mastering on the issue you used, the CD I have sounds much better.

Yes, that's the song and artists. Which CD issue do you have? I want to get it as I love this recording.

12. The great James Booker from The Lost Paramount Tapes. Booker is one of my heroes , and one of the few R & B musicians I would classify as a genius. There are times, like near the end of this track, where it sounds like he has three hands, at least. Among the other pleasures of this cut is Jessie Hill’s two-tambourine style – funky, funky, funky. I regret that I didn’t visit New Orleans for the first time until after Booker was dead. I prefer Booker solo, but this is still great. Thanks!

Wow. I am really impressed with your abilities here. It is "The Lost Paramount Tapes", which I ordered by mail from a store in New Orleans. I have never seen a copy in a store.

Absolutely correct. Go to the head of the class.

gototheheadoftheclass.jpg

I have the Henderson track on a double CD which I'm sure is now out of print - Ridin' in Rhythm on DRG. If you can find it, it's got some great stuff - Ellington, Benny Carter, Coleman Hawkins, Henderson.

You'll have to get up pretty early in the morning to stump me on James Booker. I got the Lost Paramount CD at the Louisiana Music Factory on Decatur St.

Thanks for sending me to the head of the class. I enjoyed this BFT - thanks for putting it together.

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9. This drove me crazy! I knew it was something I was familiar with – probably in my collection - and I recognized Fletcher Henderson’s band and the soloists: Dickie Wells, Red Allen, Coleman Hawkins, and Buster Bailey (I thought), but I couldn’t remember what the tune was. Then I remembered that odd session the Henderson band recorded under brother Horace Henderson’s name for a British label and pulled out the CD. Yep, it’s “Minnie the Moocher’s Wedding Day.” Pretty good little early swing tune. And I see that I was wrong about the clarinetist. I hate the fake stereo mastering on the issue you used, the CD I have sounds much better.

Yes, that's the song and artists. Which CD issue do you have? I want to get it as I love this recording.

12. The great James Booker from The Lost Paramount Tapes. Booker is one of my heroes , and one of the few R & B musicians I would classify as a genius. There are times, like near the end of this track, where it sounds like he has three hands, at least. Among the other pleasures of this cut is Jessie Hill’s two-tambourine style – funky, funky, funky. I regret that I didn’t visit New Orleans for the first time until after Booker was dead. I prefer Booker solo, but this is still great. Thanks!

Wow. I am really impressed with your abilities here. It is "The Lost Paramount Tapes", which I ordered by mail from a store in New Orleans. I have never seen a copy in a store.

Absolutely correct. Go to the head of the class.

gototheheadoftheclass.jpg

I have the Henderson track on a double CD which I'm sure is now out of print - Ridin' in Rhythm on DRG. If you can find it, it's got some great stuff - Ellington, Benny Carter, Coleman Hawkins, Henderson.

You'll have to get up pretty early in the morning to stump me on James Booker. I got the Lost Paramount CD at the Louisiana Music Factory on Decatur St.

Thanks for sending me to the head of the class. I enjoyed this BFT - thanks for putting it together.

Thanks for the information on a better sounding "Minnie the Moocher's Wedding Day." I am going to try to find "Ridin' In Rhythm."

I am glad that you liked this BFT. I had fun putting it together.

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Disc Two, tk. 5 - "Mr. B.C.," from Sphere Music (I think!) Originally issued on JMT. Ralph Peterson kills!

415W4AR1T0L._SL500_AA130_.gif

I could kick myself for having sold this album...

That is all correct. You win this:

a-trophy.gif

I'm both honored and quite humbled, HP! Thanks for putting together such a terrific BFT. Now if i can *just* nail Disc Two, tk. 7, I'll be a very happy gal!

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I'm gonna take a stab at Disc One, tk. 2 - I think it could be from Dave Douglas' album Freak In, but I'm not 100% sure...

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I'm gonna take a stab at Disc One, tk. 2 - I think it could be from Dave Douglas' album Freak In, but I'm not 100% sure...

That is not correct.

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Thank you, Seeline, for bringing my obsessive quest to nail Disc 2 Track 5 to a successful end!

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Thank you, Seeline, for bringing my obsessive quest to nail Disc 2 Track 5 to a successful end!

De nada! I was being pretty obsessive about it myself - those opening phrases (piano and cl.) have been stuck in my head for a long time.

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Outside chance guess for sure - Disc One, tk. 6 is something by Ray Anderson with Ibrahim Electric, maybe???

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Outside chance guess for sure - Disc One, tk. 6 is something by Ray Anderson with Ibrahim Electric, maybe???

This is not correct.

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No worries, Al! And thanks for all your hard work on this.

*

I just realized that I never responded to this post, so I will now.

Disc 2, tk. 7 - well, I'm going to guess that the accordionist *might* be Guy Klucevsek, but as to the rest (tuba, clarinet and strings), gah - maybe this is from a Tzadik release by someone or other? It's very Balkan/klezmer-ish, but beyond that, I'm not sure if I'm hearing the usual suspects. (Maybe it's a European group?)

Or... is that Chris Speed on clarinet??? Or (hate to keep repeating myself) Don Byron? (Those NY people, always messing around with "weird" fusion music.... ;))

None of the individuals you mentioned are on this song.

and... I think Disc Two, tk. 3 *might* be James Newton, but again, I'm not sure... Whoever it is, they have that gorgeous French flute sound that some of the best classical flutists have (like the late Jean-Pierre Rampal)....

Oh wait - It's Steve Kujala, isn't it?! With Chick Corea, maybe? (I have the disc they made together, but haven't listened to it in ages...)

2nd iteration of "Oh, wait!" - if not Kujala (and I think it's not), then maybe Robert Dick? But the keyboard (is that a Fender Rhodes?) sounds so 70s-ish... I'm sure that it's not Lew Tabackin, but at this point, I'm just making wild guesses!

3d iteration: James Newton. (I think!)

The flute player on Disc 2, Track 3 is not James Newton.

Disc Two, tk. 5 - I'm pretty sure that's Don Byron on clarinet. As for the rest, ??? But maybe it's... John Carter?

This has now been completely identified, by you!

Disc 2, tk. 6 - sounds like Don Byron and Bill Frisell to me - maybe it's from "This Land"?

By now this has been identified as to Byron and Frisell, but not by album. It is not from "This Land."

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One-off listen, no peeking. There were a few moments I really dug on disc 1 and many I really didn't enjoy at all. I still offer thanks for the time spent creating the test; more comments in that regard after track feedback.

1 - No idea. Kinda stiff, pseudo-hip 50s/60s drumming. Sounds movie sound track-ish.

2 - Not my bag, baby. The concept is somewhat interesting, but remixed anything is swill of the highest order IMHO. I do find this more creative than the pop-ish efforts of the early 80s, but it really does nada for me. No idea who it is. Reminds me a bit of Miles' TUTU redone with a CGI mentality.

3 - No clue. I don't have a lot of this sort of stuff in my collection, but I do like it.

4 - Same as three in assessment. There used to be a local radio show on public radio where the guy would play a lot of stuff from this era. He's not on the local outlet anymore (long story: www.thehumblefarmer.com) so I don't get much exposure to this sort of stuff any longer.

5 - No guess.

6 - Differently interesting -- would be more so with real instruments instead of the canned drums. Our drummer likes to play that "remix" beat, but does so on a real kit. In the right spot, it works really well. This just strikes me as over-produced.

7 - Crepuscule With Nellie, I believe. Man, guy didn't write a bad tune, but digitized music collection has removed my ability to pair up the correct title with the correct melody. First few notes of the intro had me thinking Ibrahim, but I'm leaning to someone more toward the tradition. Hmmm... towards the middle I'm leaning Abdullah Ibrahim again. I'll stay there.

8 - This has the feel that I like about Masada. I'd appreciate this more live -- sounds like the animal sounds were instrument produced at first, but losing me now with the crowd sounds dubbed in. I just don't understand the need to do this. Like Billy Harper's latest effort -- it detracts from the music. Can't take the horse -- moving on.

9 - First impulse is that it's too clean. I recall reading a BFT given to David Liebman where he was very down on... either WSQ or one of Bluiett's other bands. He said, "Something like this has to be really tight for it to work." Proof to me that he doesn't get it. This is nice, inoffensive and technically correct in every way. I also find it rather boring and pedestrian.

10 - First impression was to rebel against the swirling sound, but he has Ra-like overtones. That's definitely John Gilmore. I don't have this, but it's got to be Sun Ra. I can't explain why the electronics work on this for me, but not on the other stuff, but it's just... different. I once played Richard Hollyday's Cape Verdean Blues (with Billy Pierce, James Williams, John Lockwood and Alan Dawson) back-to-back with Horace Silver's version. His reaction when to the latter sums it up better than I can: "There! Now you're talking! Sounds like somebody gives a shit."

11 - The song sounds familiar, like it might be a pop song. No idea of the players. It's listenable, but I'm not sure how often I'd spin it. The Bad Plus, maybe?

12 - Maybe I'm taking the easy way out, but sounds like early Duke to me. I can't say what, but I'm guessing late 20s.

13 - Can't explain why this rubs me, but it does. The recording is compressed, and the angular melody doesn't do much for me. Trumpet has an in-your-face sound/approach, which is at at times appealing, but the drums are grating. Tenor sounds like Brecker to me, simply because I'm having such an averse reaction to it. This is precisely the sort of Jazz I tend to avoid, but can't articulate why.

14 - Obviously Stormy Weather. Reminds me of some of those quirky Kenton dates. Interesting, but I wouldn't spin it often. No clue on the who.

15 - No clue. Fun, but not a lasting impression.

16 - Very likable. Basie-esque, but I don't believe it's actually the band. That's B.B. King. I assume this is from that same disc as the recording of Don't Get Around Much Anymore with some of the Ellington guys. B.B. made money, but this guy just gets me.

No doubt this will rub some, but I think it's worth saying. If someone makes a BFT, I'll give them my time -- I think I owe them that when I choose to be a part of these. That said, this is a prime example of why I lobby to keep them to one disc. The general statement is not enhanced by the extra data, and when the test is off-putting to the listener, it makes it difficult to offer constructive commentary. Not sure a rule is necessary, but perhaps judicious restraint on the part of the participants. You can always sign up for a second test for that extra disc, and 80 minutes (for a one-and-out attempt) is not something a lot of us have just kicking around our day that we can just write off. My $.02.

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Planned to do disc two later, because I felt like my reaction to disc one was vicious, and I feel bad about that. However, when I saw 5 pages of responses, I decided to trudge on, I'm just too curious.

Disc 2

1 - Not feeling this in the early going, at all. Never really warmed up to soprano in the big band setting. Feels very soundtrackish to me. Maybe this comes out of watching Starsky & Hutch on DVD last night, but much of these discs has had that sound to me. If I'm watching a car chase, or story development, this would work, but it's not maintaining my interest simply as a listen.

2 - Oh no you dih'n't! That's Flowers For Albert as ska. Not sure what this is right off the bat, but it's one of my favorite David Murray tunes; and it's a disgrace that it doesn't get covered, ever. Ska is fun, but in fairness, if I didn't love David, I'd probably be harder on this. Sounds like Olu Dara on cornet. I'll say George Lewis on trombone, but not with confidence. I know it's NOT Ku-umba or Craig Harris. Not sure of the other tenor, but he's learning the humility of sharing a date with DM. Maybe Bill Saxton, but seems too reserved.

3 - Intro had me thinking "If I could save time in a bottle...," but no idea. Seems very over produced (which is tough to accomplish on a duet).

4 - Not sure, but I like it. Simple, with feeling.

5 - Drums make me think Smitty Smith, just because they're too busy and too aggressive. No idea the clarinet. Just has that busy, schooled sound. Not my bag. One of the disciples of Tyner. Reminds me a lot of the David Holland dates with Gary Thomas.

6 - Self-Portrait in 3 Colors. Not sure who, but it reminds me of the sound of Monk In Motian. I'd have to guess Bill Frisell. It's interesting, but not something I'd spin much. I respect the approach a great deal.

7 - One of my students once told me, "Klezmer was first developed as a form of defense."

8 - I'm a sucker for all latin music. I try to listen to the show on WBUR out of Boston on Saturday night when I can, but after about 3-4 songs, I have my fix and move on. Bari on top of latin -- you had me at hello. I always lean this way on that combination, but that sounds like Mario Rivera on bari, so I'd guess one of Tito's bands.

9 - Simple, honest swing. Wouldn't spin it much, but nice to listen to.

10 - Domo Arrigato, Mr. Roboto. Hmmm... how loudly can I project the notion of NO!

11 - I'm a sucker for arco bass and could listen to it all day long. Not sure who this is, but confident about who it isn't.

12 - realized that for some reason, the final 3 cuts weren't in my rotation, and went back (didn't start till after I'd reached the update). Recognized the tune, and assume it's the Xmas tune, but it does... hmmm... nothing for me. John Valby?

13 - When The Saints Go Marching Into The Remixed Hood. Doesn't touch me. Never a big fan of the many bad versions, and have heard some absolutely lovely versions. Oh, I'm out --- cannot abide rap (and the C is silent).

14 - Ah... so that'd be the Xmas tune. Just, why?

Sorry for my embittered reactions to much of this, but they are honest. Thanks for the test, now off to read.

Edited by Thom Keith

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One-off listen, no peeking. There were a few moments I really dug on disc 1 and many I really didn't enjoy at all. I still offer thanks for the time spent creating the test; more comments in that regard after track feedback.

1 - No idea. Kinda stiff, pseudo-hip 50s/60s drumming. Sounds movie sound track-ish.

2 - Not my bag, baby. The concept is somewhat interesting, but remixed anything is swill of the highest order IMHO. I do find this more creative than the pop-ish efforts of the early 80s, but it really does nada for me. No idea who it is. Reminds me a bit of Miles' TUTU redone with a CGI mentality.

3 - No clue. I don't have a lot of this sort of stuff in my collection, but I do like it.

4 - Same as three in assessment. There used to be a local radio show on public radio where the guy would play a lot of stuff from this era. He's not on the local outlet anymore (long story: www.thehumblefarmer.com) so I don't get much exposure to this sort of stuff any longer.

5 - No guess.

6 - Differently interesting -- would be more so with real instruments instead of the canned drums. Our drummer likes to play that "remix" beat, but does so on a real kit. In the right spot, it works really well. This just strikes me as over-produced.

7 - Crepuscule With Nellie, I believe. Man, guy didn't write a bad tune, but digitized music collection has removed my ability to pair up the correct title with the correct melody. First few notes of the intro had me thinking Ibrahim, but I'm leaning to someone more toward the tradition. Hmmm... towards the middle I'm leaning Abdullah Ibrahim again. I'll stay there.

8 - This has the feel that I like about Masada. I'd appreciate this more live -- sounds like the animal sounds were instrument produced at first, but losing me now with the crowd sounds dubbed in. I just don't understand the need to do this. Like Billy Harper's latest effort -- it detracts from the music. Can't take the horse -- moving on.

9 - First impulse is that it's too clean. I recall reading a BFT given to David Liebman where he was very down on... either WSQ or one of Bluiett's other bands. He said, "Something like this has to be really tight for it to work." Proof to me that he doesn't get it. This is nice, inoffensive and technically correct in every way. I also find it rather boring and pedestrian.

10 - First impression was to rebel against the swirling sound, but he has Ra-like overtones. That's definitely John Gilmore. I don't have this, but it's got to be Sun Ra. I can't explain why the electronics work on this for me, but not on the other stuff, but it's just... different. I once played Richard Hollyday's Cape Verdean Blues (with Billy Pierce, James Williams, John Lockwood and Alan Dawson) back-to-back with Horace Silver's version. His reaction when to the latter sums it up better than I can: "There! Now you're talking! Sounds like somebody gives a shit."

11 - The song sounds familiar, like it might be a pop song. No idea of the players. It's listenable, but I'm not sure how often I'd spin it. The Bad Plus, maybe?

12 - Maybe I'm taking the easy way out, but sounds like early Duke to me. I can't say what, but I'm guessing late 20s.

13 - Can't explain why this rubs me, but it does. The recording is compressed, and the angular melody doesn't do much for me. Trumpet has an in-your-face sound/approach, which is at at times appealing, but the drums are grating. Tenor sounds like Brecker to me, simply because I'm having such an averse reaction to it. This is precisely the sort of Jazz I tend to avoid, but can't articulate why.

14 - Obviously Stormy Weather. Reminds me of some of those quirky Kenton dates. Interesting, but I wouldn't spin it often. No clue on the who.

15 - No clue. Fun, but not a lasting impression.

16 - Very likable. Basie-esque, but I don't believe it's actually the band. That's B.B. King. I assume this is from that same disc as the recording of Don't Get Around Much Anymore with some of the Ellington guys. B.B. made money, but this guy just gets me.

No doubt this will rub some, but I think it's worth saying. If someone makes a BFT, I'll give them my time -- I think I owe them that when I choose to be a part of these. That said, this is a prime example of why I lobby to keep them to one disc. The general statement is not enhanced by the extra data, and when the test is off-putting to the listener, it makes it difficult to offer constructive commentary. Not sure a rule is necessary, but perhaps judicious restraint on the part of the participants. You can always sign up for a second test for that extra disc, and 80 minutes (for a one-and-out attempt) is not something a lot of us have just kicking around our day that we can just write off. My $.02.

Track 7 is not by Abdullah Ibahim.

With regard to Track 8, the composer had a certain purpose for the sound effects. I had not heard the piece until after I read the liner notes, so I knew what the purpose was, and my first listen was colored by that. Your comments, and the comments of others, indicate that the composer did not really accomplish his purpose with the sound effects, because no one who has not read the liner notes understands the composer's purpose.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Planned to do disc two later, because I felt like my reaction to disc one was vicious, and I feel bad about that. However, when I saw 5 pages of responses, I decided to trudge on, I'm just too curious.

Disc 2

1 - Not feeling this in the early going, at all. Never really warmed up to soprano in the big band setting. Feels very soundtrackish to me. Maybe this comes out of watching Starsky & Hutch on DVD last night, but much of these discs has had that sound to me. If I'm watching a car chase, or story development, this would work, but it's not maintaining my interest simply as a listen.

2 - Oh no you dih'n't! That's Flowers For Albert as ska. Not sure what this is right off the bat, but it's one of my favorite David Murray tunes; and it's a disgrace that it doesn't get covered, ever. Ska is fun, but in fairness, if I didn't love David, I'd probably be harder on this. Sounds like Olu Dara on cornet. I'll say George Lewis on trombone, but not with confidence. I know it's NOT Ku-umba or Craig Harris. Not sure of the other tenor, but he's learning the humility of sharing a date with DM. Maybe Bill Saxton, but seems too reserved.

3 - Intro had me thinking "If I could save time in a bottle...," but no idea. Seems very over produced (which is tough to accomplish on a duet).

4 - Not sure, but I like it. Simple, with feeling.

5 - Drums make me think Smitty Smith, just because they're too busy and too aggressive. No idea the clarinet. Just has that busy, schooled sound. Not my bag. One of the disciples of Tyner. Reminds me a lot of the David Holland dates with Gary Thomas.

6 - Self-Portrait in 3 Colors. Not sure who, but it reminds me of the sound of Monk In Motian. I'd have to guess Bill Frisell. It's interesting, but not something I'd spin much. I respect the approach a great deal.

7 - One of my students once told me, "Klezmer was first developed as a form of defense."

8 - I'm a sucker for all latin music. I try to listen to the show on WBUR out of Boston on Saturday night when I can, but after about 3-4 songs, I have my fix and move on. Bari on top of latin -- you had me at hello. I always lean this way on that combination, but that sounds like Mario Rivera on bari, so I'd guess one of Tito's bands.

You are the first one to guess the artist correctly. Do you know the song and time period in which it was recorded?

9 - Simple, honest swing. Wouldn't spin it much, but nice to listen to.

10 - Domo Arrigato, Mr. Roboto. Hmmm... how loudly can I project the notion of NO!

11 - I'm a sucker for arco bass and could listen to it all day long. Not sure who this is, but confident about who it isn't.

12 - realized that for some reason, the final 3 cuts weren't in my rotation, and went back (didn't start till after I'd reached the update). Recognized the tune, and assume it's the Xmas tune, but it does... hmmm... nothing for me. John Valby?

13 - When The Saints Go Marching Into The Remixed Hood. Doesn't touch me. Never a big fan of the many bad versions, and have heard some absolutely lovely versions. Oh, I'm out --- cannot abide rap (and the C is silent).

14 - Ah... so that'd be the Xmas tune. Just, why?

Why--for fun. It's so outrageously over the top that it is amazing on some level. However, the artist's career is no joke.

Sorry for my embittered reactions to much of this, but they are honest. Thanks for the test, now off to read.

I appreciate your honest reactions. Others have said that they like the music. To each their own.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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