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Bol

Voltage converter question

12 posts in this topic

Hi folks,

I just moved from US to UK, and brought my CD player and amplifier with me.  I am trying to figure out what kind of voltage converter I need.  I am completely ignorant about these matters, but how much wattage would a normal CD player (NAD C 516BEE) and an ancient Sony amplifier (with built in phono amp) use?  I can't figure it out by looking at the back panels of these things.  If you know any ballpark figure, I would be grateful for your guidance.  Thanks.

And if you know of any brand name of these converters that you think are reliable, I would be happy to have that too.  Lots of choices on Amazon UK.

Edited by Bol

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i think you're going to need a step-up transformer.

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Sorry I missed this one earlier. Dmitry is correct, you simply need a converter. There are a lot of step up converters on the market, but I've never needed one, so I can't recommend a particular make or model. 

As for the math, it isn't necessary. Your equipment will run just fine on any step up, as they all put out 110 volts. Maybe check out some online reviews? I'm sure you could get a decent one for less than $20. 

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No - Not a step up converter. What is needed is a voltage step down converter, from 230/240V AC down to 110/115V AC.  When I did the move back over here I used one for a while until I got my kit of the time internally reconfigured by the manufacturer.

Unfortunately my converter is now stowed away Bol so can't check at this time but from memory I think they are around 1kW rating or thereabouts. Typical U.K. amps are fused at around 2 or 3A, into 240V. The unit I have has a UK plug lead (3 wire with earth) at the back and a bank of North American style 2-pin connectors located at the front. 

Hope this helps !

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It's referred to as a step up converter, but isn't it the same thing as a step down converter? It should plug into a North American socket, and have a female socket to plug into. 

???

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The converter for European use would be a step down converter (as in step down transformer). The front panel usually has a bank of (female) North American type sockets. The power lead at the back would (in the UK) have a 3-pin (live/neutral/earth) UK style fused plug, with earth bonded to the metal casing of the converter.

The whole thing should be CE marked as well, of course !

Edited by sidewinder

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Good lord, sidewinder! I completely misread Bol's initial post! Must be some kind of latent dyslexia on my part, but I read that he was moving to the US FROM the UK! 

My sincerest apologies, Bol! Dmitry and I were COMPLETELY wrong, and sidewinder is 100% correct! 

Though, I'm still confused as to why they are referenced in opposition. You're stepping UP in voltage in the UK, and stepping down in the US. 

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 No problem.

With regard to the step up/down, the convention is source to destination for voltage so for powering 115V rated devices in the U.K. it is step down.

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Ah! Thanks for the explanation. Makes perfect sense. I was only considering the current, and not the source. Duh moment on my part. 

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I always wondered if these simple step/step down converters do anything with the frequency and if this affects audio gear at all. The US uses 110-120 AC Volts at 60 Hz. The UK uses 230-240 AC Volts at 50 Hz.

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I think you need new equipment. But what do I know?

 

You could charge it to your employer maybe?

 

 

 

Bear in mind that my way of doing things is not good. People often tell me so.

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