CardinalJazzFan

Blindfold Test #163

38 posts in this topic

Late to the party, but I'm still enjoying it.

I've been fascinated with Track 5 for decades. One of Rushing's great performances. And the presence of Jimmy Jones really changes the band.

Didn't recognize 12 until I picked up on Jack Bruce's voice. It's a chunk of "Escalator Over the Hill."

Can't wait to know the identity of 14. Something out of Scandinavia, perhaps? I have a lot of discs that sound like the string music in the first few minutes of this track.

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11 hours ago, Spontooneous said:

Didn't recognize 12 until I picked up on Jack Bruce's voice. It's a chunk of "Escalator Over the Hill."

homer-doh.jpg

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Yes, Track 12 is a track from Carla Bley's "Escalator Over the Hill."

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Actually, Track 11 is also from Escalator Over the Hill. Tracks 11 and 12 make up Side 5 of the 3 LP set of Escalator Over the Hill.

Don Cherry and the Desert Band begin the music on Side 5 with our Track 11, entitled “A.I.R. (All India Radio)”.

That is followed on Side 5 by our Track 12, “Rawalpindi Blues”. Track 12 starts out with Jack’s Traveling Band (Jack Bruce, John McLaughlin, Carla Bley, Paul Motian). Then the Desert Band with the Sand Shepherd (Don Cherry) closes “Rawalpindi Blues” and Side 5 of the album.

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1 hour ago, Hot Ptah said:

Actually, Track 11 is also from Escalator Over the Hill. Tracks 11 and 12 make up Side 5 of the 3 LP set of Escalator Over the Hill.

Don Cherry and the Desert Band begin the music on Side 5 with our Track 11, entitled “A.I.R. (All India Radio)”.

That is followed on Side 5 by our Track 12, “Rawalpindi Blues”. Track 12 starts out with Jack’s Traveling Band (Jack Bruce, John McLaughlin, Carla Bley, Paul Motian). Then the Desert Band with the Sand Shepherd (Don Cherry) closes “Rawalpindi Blues” and Side 5 of the album.

That is all correct. 

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Here is something I have wondered about "Rawalpindi Blues", Track 12 on this Blindfold Test.  In the booklet that comes with the LP set of Escalator Over the Hill, the lyrics are printed in a back section. The lines that Jack Bruce sings on "Rawalpindi Blues"  are credited to "Jack". There are responses sung by someone else, to what Jack is singing, credited to "His Friends." For example, :"His Friends" sing "let me stay away from you," and "what will we ever do with you."

There is a separate section in the front of the booklet with the title "Musicians." . It shows that Jack's Traveling Band, the band on "Rawalpindi Blues",  consists of John McLaughlin, Carla Bley, Jack Bruce, and Paul Motian. There is no mention of "His Friends" in that musician credits section.

There is yet another section near the front of the booklet with the title "Cast.", That section lists characters' names and which musicians and singers play them. It does not say which songs they appear on. In the "Cast" section, "His Friends" are Charlie Haden and Steve Ferguson.

So is it Charlie Haden and Steve Ferguson singing the response parts on "Rawalpindi Blues"/ I have read that Charlie Haden was part of a family country band as a child. I am not sure if Charlie Haden could sing well.

It is not made certain and clear, in the booklet and its credits.

Edited by CardinalJazzFan

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You've provided two cuts from EOTH, neither of which I recognized, one of which I liked a big whole lot, the other which I found kind of annoying.

For me, all of this adds up a need to revisit ETOH more than just casually, so thank you for that!

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4 hours ago, JSngry said:

You've provided two cuts from EOTH, neither of which I recognized, one of which I liked a big whole lot, the other which I found kind of annoying.

For me, all of this adds up a need to revisit ETOH more than just casually, so thank you for that!

I am glad if I inspired you. My favorites are the Overture (Side 1 of the three record set) and Side 5, but there are other pleasures throughout.

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No one has mentioned it so I will say that I like John McLaugjlin’s electric guitar solo on “Rawalpindi Blues”.  My reaction is that it is a compelling electric guitar solo without the overwhelming flurry of fast notes that was the characteristic of his Mahavishnu Orchestra playing not long after this. It was a different approach for John, which he did not explore further in recordings as far as I know. 

Edited by CardinalJazzFan

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Sorry, thought I had posted, but I don't see it.  

Track 01 - A west coasty sound to me.  Not a strong point for me.  I like this.  It's not earth shattering, but quite pleasant.  No guesses.

Track 02 - My first thought was Roy Eldredge, but it's pretty clear it wasn't him.  The tune is Avalon.  Oh!  There's Jaws.  Okay, so this must be Sweets with his ass on fire.  Very cool.

Track 03 - Fiery alto.  It's Phil Woods for sure.  Later than the period I prefer, but that SOB sure could play!  Growly tenor.  Couldn't place him at first, then it hit me -- Lew Tabackin.  Lew is weird.  I'll love him for two tracks, but then remember why he's on my second-tier list.  However, when he shows up after not hearing him for awhile, he always leaves me with a positive reaction.  A former teacher put it this way:  "He married well."  Sounds corker, here, though!  Drummer is too busy to swing, particularly on the breaks.  Somehow I missed that it was Limehouse Blues until the out-chorus.

Track 04 - Oh!  That's a Randy Weston tune.  Tanjah.  Not sure which version, but one I am less familiar with.  Seems like either one of his older (pre-1990) bands, or something very recent.  Sound leads me to believe the former... welp, there goes that theory, because there is Billy Harper.  Going back to the collection, my instincts weren't far off, but for some reason, I thought this album was newer than it is.  It's from this.    

Track 05 - Jimmy Jones!  Ellington Jazz Party, Hello Little Girl feating Dizzy on trumpet, Little Jimmy Rushing on vocal and Jimmy Jones on piano.  Woodyard... man!  This was one of my favorite albums growing up, particularly this track.  BITCHIN'!  Though, with the headphones and modern mastering, I have to say the post-production work on this is more maddening than ever.  The splicing (and applause on my vinyl copy) were (are) horrendous.  Friggin' Columbia.

Track 06 - Sounds like Betty Carter, but I'm not sure what it is.  The opening rhythm section had me thinking it was one of the George Coleman dates with Harold Mabern, so I'll stick with that guess on piano, but no idea who the others are.

Track 07 - Sure sounds like the Ellington band to me, but from earlier than I'm really solid on (that should bother me more than it does).  Yeah, definitely Carney and Hodges, so it's Duke.  Even the stuff that predates the bulk of my listening maintains one solid truth -- Ellington ALWAYS commands your attention.  Perfectly content to listen to this multiple times over, right now, though I can't be more specific about who/what it is.  

Track 08 - Oooo... tasty.  Song is familiar, but I'm not going to get it.  I love the feel of this.  Subdued, clean, but very interesting.  Ah!  Now, who's the alto?  Could be Phil Woods, again, but seems warmer to my ear.  Pleasant, thoughtful, and... well, warm.  No guess on the guitarist, but very tasteful.  Good pick -- looking forward to the reveal.  That breath controlled vibrato suggests old school... perhaps one of the teacher-types?

Track 09 - Very Early for this sort of song. I swear I have heard this before, which means I'm a tool, because I should be able to ID it, and cannot.  

Track 10 - Loving the droning (more than the keys, but it works).  Not sure I'd go to this a lot, but definitely the sort of thing I'd love to have swimming around my collection.  In fact, it has a distinct under-water feel to it.  Again, looking forward to the reveal. If the trumpets were more in-your-face, I would guess Kenton, because it's weird (in a very good way).  Reverb is a lot, but again, it works.  The trumpet soli kind of lost me... reminds me of some of the Bill Dixon stuff in my collection.

Track 11 - Sounds like Cherry to me, but oddly, I'm not familiar with this.  There was a time in my life where my Friday nights were occupied with listening to music like this... on a schedule.  I kind of miss that.  I'm going to have to finish the rest of the test in another listening session, but I have to admit, I'm intrigued after this cut.

Track 12 - Don't know what it is, but I want a whole lot more of it!!!

Track 13 - Has the quirky, anti-swing rhythm of Braxton.  I like the drums/bass, but the horns are leaving me with that Braxtonian emptiness.  Solo section, that feeling continues until the trumpet, which is obviously Kenny Wheeler.  Just not feeling the alto nor the melody.

Track 14 - Clueless about this, and a little cold by it, until about the five minute mark.  NOW we're getting somewhere.  Maybe a Manglesdorff project?  A very enjoyable slice of mayhem is what this becomes.  

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2 hours ago, tkeith said:

Sorry, thought I had posted, but I don't see it.  

Track 01 - A west coasty sound to me.  Not a strong point for me.  I like this.  It's not earth shattering, but quite pleasant.  No guesses.

Track 02 - My first thought was Roy Eldredge, but it's pretty clear it wasn't him.  The tune is Avalon.  Oh!  There's Jaws.  Okay, so this must be Sweets with his ass on fire.  Very cool.  Yes, it is Sweets and Jaws.

 

2 hours ago, tkeith said:

Track 03 - Fiery alto.  It's Phil Woods for sure.  Later than the period I prefer, but that SOB sure could play!  Growly tenor.  Couldn't place him at first, then it hit me -- Lew Tabackin.  Lew is weird.  I'll love him for two tracks, but then remember why he's on my second-tier list.  However, when he shows up after not hearing him for awhile, he always leaves me with a positive reaction.  A former teacher put it this way:  "He married well."  Sounds corker, here, though!  Drummer is too busy to swing, particularly on the breaks.  Somehow I missed that it was Limehouse Blues until the out-chorus.   Phil and Lew, yes. I saw Lew live several times with the big band, and then in a Salute to Newport all star group, and he always played great live.

Track 04 - Oh!  That's a Randy Weston tune.  Tanjah.  Not sure which version, but one I am less familiar with.  Seems like either one of his older (pre-1990) bands, or something very recent.  Sound leads me to believe the former... welp, there goes that theory, because there is Billy Harper.  Going back to the collection, my instincts weren't far off, but for some reason, I thought this album was newer than it is.  It's from this.    Yes.

Track 05 - Jimmy Jones!  Ellington Jazz Party, Hello Little Girl feating Dizzy on trumpet, Little Jimmy Rushing on vocal and Jimmy Jones on piano.  Woodyard... man!  This was one of my favorite albums growing up, particularly this track.  BITCHIN'!  Though, with the headphones and modern mastering, I have to say the post-production work on this is more maddening than ever.  The splicing (and applause on my vinyl copy) were (are) horrendous.  Friggin' Columbia.  Yes, you are correct. I wonder what they cut out with the splicing.

Track 06 - Sounds like Betty Carter, but I'm not sure what it is.  The opening rhythm section had me thinking it was one of the George Coleman dates with Harold Mabern, so I'll stick with that guess on piano, but no idea who the others are.  It is Betty Carter, but not Harold Mabern..

Track 07 - Sure sounds like the Ellington band to me, but from earlier than I'm really solid on (that should bother me more than it does).  Yeah, definitely Carney and Hodges, so it's Duke.  Even the stuff that predates the bulk of my listening maintains one solid truth -- Ellington ALWAYS commands your attention.  Perfectly content to listen to this multiple times over, right now, though I can't be more specific about who/what it is.  It is the Ellington band.

Track 08 - Oooo... tasty.  Song is familiar, but I'm not going to get it.  I love the feel of this.  Subdued, clean, but very interesting.  Ah!  Now, who's the alto?  Could be Phil Woods, again, but seems warmer to my ear.  Pleasant, thoughtful, and... well, warm.  No guess on the guitarist, but very tasteful.  Good pick -- looking forward to the reveal.  That breath controlled vibrato suggests old school... perhaps one of the teacher-types?  As you will find out in the Reveal today, it is Phil Woods.

Track 09 - Very Early for this sort of song. I swear I have heard this before, which means I'm a tool, because I should be able to ID it, and cannot.  It is Very Early.

Track 10 - Loving the droning (more than the keys, but it works).  Not sure I'd go to this a lot, but definitely the sort of thing I'd love to have swimming around my collection.  In fact, it has a distinct under-water feel to it.  Again, looking forward to the reveal. If the trumpets were more in-your-face, I would guess Kenton, because it's weird (in a very good way).  Reverb is a lot, but again, it works.  The trumpet soli kind of lost me... reminds me of some of the Bill Dixon stuff in my collection.

Track 11 - Sounds like Cherry to me, but oddly, I'm not familiar with this.  There was a time in my life where my Friday nights were occupied with listening to music like this... on a schedule.  I kind of miss that.  I'm going to have to finish the rest of the test in another listening session, but I have to admit, I'm intrigued after this cut.  It is Don Cherry.

Track 12 - Don't know what it is, but I want a whole lot more of it!!!  Me too. I wish that the artist had continued with more music like this.

Track 13 - Has the quirky, anti-swing rhythm of Braxton.  I like the drums/bass, but the horns are leaving me with that Braxtonian emptiness.  Solo section, that feeling continues until the trumpet, which is obviously Kenny Wheeler.  Just not feeling the alto nor the melody. It is Braxton and Kenny Wheeler.

Track 14 - Clueless about this, and a little cold by it, until about the five minute mark.  NOW we're getting somewhere.  Maybe a Manglesdorff project?  A very enjoyable slice of mayhem is what this becomes.  Not Mangelsdorff.

I am glad that you got this in, as I am posting the Reveal today. My responses are in red next to your comments.

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On ‎10‎/‎27‎/‎2017 at 2:56 PM, CardinalJazzFan said:

Here is something I have wondered about "Rawalpindi Blues", Track 12 on this Blindfold Test.  In the booklet that comes with the LP set of Escalator Over the Hill, the lyrics are printed in a back section. The lines that Jack Bruce sings on "Rawalpindi Blues"  are credited to "Jack". There are responses sung by someone else, to what Jack is singing, credited to "His Friends." For example, :"His Friends" sing "let me stay away from you," and "what will we ever do with you."

There is a separate section in the front of the booklet with the title "Musicians." . It shows that Jack's Traveling Band, the band on "Rawalpindi Blues",  consists of John McLaughlin, Carla Bley, Jack Bruce, and Paul Motian. There is no mention of "His Friends" in that musician credits section.

There is yet another section near the front of the booklet with the title "Cast.", That section lists characters' names and which musicians and singers play them. It does not say which songs they appear on. In the "Cast" section, "His Friends" are Charlie Haden and Steve Ferguson.

So is it Charlie Haden and Steve Ferguson singing the response parts on "Rawalpindi Blues"/ I have read that Charlie Haden was part of a family country band as a child. I am not sure if Charlie Haden could sing well.

It is not made certain and clear, in the booklet and its credits.

That is an interesting question. I seem to recall hearing Charlie Haden sing somewhere else, but I can't place where. I do not know who Steve Ferguson is.

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2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

That is an interesting question. I seem to recall hearing Charlie Haden sing somewhere else, but I can't place where. I do not know who Steve Ferguson is.

There's a track with his  singing as a young man on Rambling Boy. 

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