Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
paul secor

Essential Solos

54 posts in this topic

I received Mosaic Records Sunday Jazz Gazette and saw this:  https://jazztimes.com/features/40-essential-solos/
I
was familiar with some of the solos (though no doubt not familiar enough), some are not to my taste, and others I had never paid attention to.
The article presented me with music to listen to and think about.
Perhaps folks here will add some favorite solos of their own. Perhaps even some obscure ones.
(Apologies if this repeats a previous thread.)
I'll add a favorite of my own - one that's not so obscure. Pres on Billie's "I Must Have That Man".

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rollins: You Don't Know What Love Is

Bill Evans: Tenderly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everybody's.

Wayne here. not just the solo, but especially the solo, his attacks, dynamics, tonal manipulations, spacing of phrases, this is a master at work.

 

Lester and Nat here, individually and collectively.

 

Early imprinting - Phil Woods on these two, Zoot on the first I think I can still sing them,

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And to Linda Oh, for catching Oliver's magnificence as an improviser, nothing but the fullest love. The solo in question is one of the marvels of the 20th Centruy imo, seeing as how it asks and answers so many questions that now seem inevitable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed! Oliver's solo on Stolen Moments is magic.

 

My favorite solo of all-time is Gary Bartz on Misty from There Goes The Neighborhood. It gets me excited every time I hear it. It isn't a flawless solo by any means but it has so much joy in it. His mastery of time is incredible, plus he burns forever too. Its a ride man. I think its accentuated by the Kennys more sedated solo before it. The way he returns to the theme and flies away, so beautiful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Miles' pleading, storytelling solo on  the quintet version of "When Lights Are Low," with its occasional suggestions that Miles' melodic sense of  the time had a kinship with that of Richard Rodgers -- e.g. the way Miles exits the solo.
 


 

Pres' solo on "Taxi War Dance" (and Dickie Wells' solo too):
 


 

Monk's solo on "Little Rootie Tootie":
 


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Superb solos by Curtis Amy + Dupree Bolton back-to-back ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Art Pepper's solo on "Besame Mucho":
 


 

Sonny Rollins' "St. Thomas":
 




 



 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh man, Eric Dolphy’s solo on Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting from Mingus at Antibes. 

Coltrane on Afro Blue from Live At Birdland.

Ray Draper on Clifford’s Kappa from Ray Draper Quintet (featuring John Coltrane). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul Desmond's solo on "Blues In Time:"
 




 

Jackie McLean's solo on "Help":
 


 

Clifford Brown's solo on "I Can't Get Started":
 

 

Albert Stinson's solo on "My Joy" (begins at about 4:50):
 

 

Johnny Dodds on "Perdido St. Blues" (sober trumpeter George Mitchell too):
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Larry Kart said:

Albert Stinson's solo on "My Joy" (begins at about 4:50):
 

 

:tup:tup:tup!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The haunting solo by Clifford Brown really hits the spot ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Charlie Parker, "Warming Up a Riff"

Lester Young, "These Foolish Things"

Bud Powell, "Parisian Thoroughfare"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bud: "It Never Entered My Mind" - some of the most deeply felt music I've ever heard

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jimmy Yancey, "At the Window"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, paul secor said:

Bud: "It Never Entered My Mind" - some of the most deeply felt music I've ever heard

 

It's almost unbearably poignant (IMHO).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Simon Weil said:

It's almost unbearably poignant (IMHO).

Your words speak more eloquently than mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes to Johnny Dodds and George Mitchell in "Perdido Street Blues."

AND Johnny Dodds in King Oliver's :Someday Sweetheart."

And Johnny Dodds in his "Hear Me Talking."

And Johnny Dodds in his 1938 "Melancholy" and Charlie Shavers too.

:wub::wub::wub::wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Art Pepper and Warne Marsh on "All the Things You Are" (don't miss the exchanges toward the end):
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oscar Pettiford (cello) on "Now See How You Are," with Mat Mathews:
 

 

Ira Sullivan (on tenor) with Red Rodney on "Ubas":
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fred Hopkins solo (starting at 3.45) structured as survey of bass playing history .... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Milcho Leviev (starting at 4.20) ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coltrane rides the wave - provided by Paul Chambers + Philly Joe Jones - perfectly ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.