tkeith

Blindfold Test #184, July, 2019 access and discussion

16 posts in this topic

Welp, since Ken has posted the answers to #183, I'll go ahead and unleash the beast for #184.

Download and online player are in the usual place: http://thomkeith.net/index.php/blindfold-tests/

There's a range in here.  I expect a number of folks to do very well on this one.  Hopefully, there are some surprises, as well.  Good luck!

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Track 3 is "Pithecanthropus Erectus," the Mingus piece.  Great composition and performance, but this is not the famous version with Jackie McLean and Mal Waldron, nor do I think it's Mingus.  This has me wondering.

Track 4 features some fine trumpet playing, and it has that Blue Note vibe.  I would guess early Freddie Hubbard, but that is only a guess and I think it's someone less well-known.

 

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12 hours ago, Milestones said:

Track 3 is "Pithecanthropus Erectus," the Mingus piece.  Great composition and performance, but this is not the famous version with Jackie McLean and Mal Waldron, nor do I think it's Mingus.  This has me wondering.

Track 4 features some fine trumpet playing, and it has that Blue Note vibe.  I would guess early Freddie Hubbard, but that is only a guess and I think it's someone less well-known.

 

Correct tune on track 3, and you are correct that it is not Mingus.  I'm wondering what you're wondering.  ;)

I hear what you're hearing, and it's a good, on-point analysis.  You are correct that this is someone lesser known, at least lesser known than Freddie.

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12 hours ago, tkeith said:

Correct tune on track 3, and you are correct that it is not Mingus.  I'm wondering what you're wondering.  ;)

I hear what you're hearing, and it's a good, on-point analysis.  You are correct that this is someone lesser known, at least lesser known than Freddie.

That is a fine fine version of the MIngus tune.   I'm not placing it.  Thought maybe it would be from a Dannie Richmond group, but that does not exist.  I see a version on an incredibly obscure Abraham  Burton album, and I really like Burton.  Is it from that?   #4 made me think of Woody Shaw more than Freddie Hubbard, based on the writing and instrumentation.  I have a lot more listening to do on that track and the whole BFT.

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29 minutes ago, felser said:

That is a fine fine version of the MIngus tune.   I'm not placing it.  Thought maybe it would be from a Dannie Richmond group, but that does not exist.  I see a version on an incredibly obscure Abraham  Burton album, and I really like Burton.  Is it from that?   #4 made me think of Woody Shaw more than Freddie Hubbard, based on the writing and instrumentation.  I have a lot more listening to do on that track and the whole BFT.

Not Burton (though I'd LOVE to have included some of his stuff -- THE guy of his generation of tenors, IMHO). 

I see where the instrumentation on #4 would lead you down a Shaw path, but I don't hear the trumpet player from that side of the coin -- definitely more out of the Freddie side. 

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Well, #2 and #8, different as they sound, are both from this same excellent album , cuts B-2 and A-4 respectively.  Frank Strozier - that is one underrated alto player there.  The pianist, Harold Mabern, gave it away for me, he's immediately recognizable (and wonderful).  I have the album, but wonder how many people are even aware of it.

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#1 seems plenty familiar.  Obciously an older cut from the length and fidelity, but the sax player does not sound old-fashioned to me.

#2 I identified.

#3 is that great "Pithecanthropus Erectus" that I look forward to the ID on

#4 is was discussed earlier.  Good, but does not knock me out.  I would guess it is a trumpet player older than Hubbard?

#5 is certainly of interest to me, but I'm not placing it.  Less than stellar sound quality, but great feeling in the performance.  60's-70s, recorded overseas by expatriates?

#6  is wonderful, I am not placing it, look forward to the reveal.

#7 builds beautifully, has amazing trumpet playing.  Surely I must own this?  It is the pick of the BFT for me, as good as the other cuts are.  I have hopes of ID'ing this yet.

#8 I identified.  Strozier and Mabern shine on this fine re-imagining of the Marvin Gaye masterpiece.

#9 is right in my wheelhouse.  I also imagine I own this, and hope to ID it yet.

#10 is really good, does not sound familiar.  Compelling sound and good soloists

#11 is very well-played, though it doesn't knock me out.  

#12 another one I surely own and need to ID.  Tip of my tongue, and quite wonderful.

Thanks Thom, this BFT is a joy and a gift that will keep on giving throughout the month.   I am challenging myself to ID #7,#9 and #12, and certainly looking forward to the ID's on #3, #5, #6, and #10.  

 

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I will make a wild guess and say Bobby Hutcherson on #6.  The piece has a 70's vibe, and I don't know Hutch's work too well from that period. But I'm totally guessing here.   

On #7 I'm agreeing with Felser within a half-minute...now listening to more.  These may be minor players (or not), but this is a sterling performance on a simple but beautiful melody.  Tempo picks up.  Crisp cymbal work behind the pianist.   Trumpet again, actually would like the tempo to slow down. Tasty bass solo.  Really good stuff, very cohesive group.   

Track 9 has some nice straight-ahead playing.  I particularly like the drummer, who sounds like Billy Higgins (or someone quite close in style).

Track #10...probably the guitarist is the leader.  He does not sound like a major figure in either tone or style.   Some good crackling trumpet. The tenor man does not sound very distinctive to me.  Guitar comping is pretty cool, and the drum fills are even better. Fairly subtle and very effective drum solo--I'll guess (without much confidence) DeJohnette.

Track #11...another group sounding really together.  Tenor player is good, a bit like Jimmy Heath in that he never wastes notes, though it does't sound like Jimmy at all. 

Track #12...basic mainstream quintet but quite good.  It has a Blue Note fade...   No guess here. 

All quality stuff, but featuring lesser-known talents (I would suspect).  Well, none of us want to include the likes of Miles, Trane, Monk, Dolphy, etc.  

Edited by Milestones

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23 hours ago, felser said:

Well, #2 and #8, different as they sound, are both from this same excellent album , cuts B-2 and A-4 respectively.  Frank Strozier - that is one underrated alto player there.  The pianist, Harold Mabern, gave it away for me, he's immediately recognizable (and wonderful).  I have the album, but wonder how many people are even aware of it.

Quite correct.  A fun story accopanies the reveal on this one.

21 hours ago, felser said:

#1 seems plenty familiar.  Obciously an older cut from the length and fidelity, but the sax player does not sound old-fashioned to me.

You may know the tune, but unlikely the version.  My guess is you DO know all the players.

21 hours ago, felser said:

#2 I identified.

#3 is that great "Pithecanthropus Erectus" that I look forward to the ID on

Indeed.

21 hours ago, felser said:

#4 is was discussed earlier.  Good, but does not knock me out.  I would guess it is a trumpet player older than Hubbard?

He is not.

21 hours ago, felser said:

#5 is certainly of interest to me, but I'm not placing it.  Less than stellar sound quality, but great feeling in the performance.  60's-70s, recorded overseas by expatriates?

Negative, but I'm glad it's got your mind working.  This one has a great story to it.

21 hours ago, felser said:

#6  is wonderful, I am not placing it, look forward to the reveal.

It's an album I was slow to warm up to, but it always captures my attention.  A bit outside of my normal sphere.

21 hours ago, felser said:

#7 builds beautifully, has amazing trumpet playing.  Surely I must own this?  It is the pick of the BFT for me, as good as the other cuts are.  I have hopes of ID'ing this yet.

Mmmm... could be....

21 hours ago, felser said:

#8 I identified.  Strozier and Mabern shine on this fine re-imagining of the Marvin Gaye masterpiece.

#9 is right in my wheelhouse.  I also imagine I own this, and hope to ID it yet.

I will be shocked if both are not true.

21 hours ago, felser said:

#10 is really good, does not sound familiar.  Compelling sound and good soloists

Agreed.  You likely know some of the personnel.

21 hours ago, felser said:

#11 is very well-played, though it doesn't knock me out.  

Was listening to another cut off this album today and it knocked me out.  Perhaps I chose poorly.

21 hours ago, felser said:

#12 another one I surely own and need to ID.  Tip of my tongue, and quite wonderful.

I will be surprised and impressed if you get this one.

21 hours ago, felser said:

Thanks Thom, this BFT is a joy and a gift that will keep on giving throughout the month.   I am challenging myself to ID #7,#9 and #12, and certainly looking forward to the ID's on #3, #5, #6, and #10.  

 

Glad you enjoyed, sir!

15 hours ago, Milestones said:

I will make a wild guess and say Bobby Hutcherson on #6.  The piece has a 70's vibe, and I don't know Hutch's work too well from that period. But I'm totally guessing here.   

Not Hutch.  Definitely a name I have seen in these parts, though.

15 hours ago, Milestones said:

On #7 I'm agreeing with Felser within a half-minute...now listening to more.  These may be minor players (or not), but this is a sterling performance on a simple but beautiful melody.  Tempo picks up.  Crisp cymbal work behind the pianist.   Trumpet again, actually would like the tempo to slow down. Tasty bass solo.  Really good stuff, very cohesive group.   

The reaction is no surprise.  A terrific band with terrific personnel.  Unfortunately, a recording slightly off the radar.

15 hours ago, Milestones said:

Track 9 has some nice straight-ahead playing.  I particularly like the drummer, who sounds like Billy Higgins (or someone quite close in style).

Smiling Billy is correct (and now Felser will nail it).

15 hours ago, Milestones said:

Track #10...probably the guitarist is the leader.  He does not sound like a major figure in either tone or style.   Some good crackling trumpet. The tenor man does not sound very distinctive to me.  Guitar comping is pretty cool, and the drum fills are even better. Fairly subtle and very effective drum solo--I'll guess (without much confidence) DeJohnette.

Not Jack, but I'm sure he is an open influence.  Not the guitarist's date.

15 hours ago, Milestones said:

Track #11...another group sounding really together.  Tenor player is good, a bit like Jimmy Heath in that he never wastes notes, though it does't sound like Jimmy at all. 

I can see why your ears would take you there.  I think Jimmy gets less credit for his influence on the modern style.  A lot of guys, I would say, have him as an influence-once-removed; he influenced someone they consider a direct influence. 

15 hours ago, Milestones said:

Track #12...basic mainstream quintet but quite good.  It has a Blue Note fade...   No guess here. 

All quality stuff, but featuring lesser-known talents (I would suspect).  Well, none of us want to include the likes of Miles, Trane, Monk, Dolphy, etc.  

I mean, I WANT to... but that takes a lot of other options for a test out of play if you're trying to create a cohesive listening experience.  The last track has been a pleasant discovery for me.  Actually, true of 10-12.

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By discovery, do you mean things you have heard for the first time in the last few years?  Stuff that is new to your ears?  Artists you may know, but you keep going deeper into their output?

For probably all of us, jazz is like that--always something new to discover, even when not "new" it the usual sense.

 

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51 minutes ago, Milestones said:

By discovery, do you mean things you have heard for the first time in the last few years?  Stuff that is new to your ears?  Artists you may know, but you keep going deeper into their output?

For probably all of us, jazz is like that--always something new to discover, even when not "new" it the usual sense.

 

Basically new to me.  Stuff I didn't even know was out there.  Sometimes, that's stuff that's 60-70 years old.  In this case, it's newer than that.

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This is a wonderful Blindfold Test, Thom. I will have more reactions after listening some more. Miraculously I actually know one of the songs. Track 4 is Malachi Thompson, Miyako, from his Delmark album, “47th Street.”

I used to receive Jazz Record Mart’s monthly magazine/catalogue. I received it for many years. I ordered a lot of Delmark albums from it over a long period of time. Including several by Malachi Thompson. I enjoy his approach to trumpet playing, which is always thoughtful and never routine. 

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8 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

This is a wonderful Blindfold Test, Thom. I will have more reactions after listening some more. Miraculously I actually know one of the songs. Track 4 is Malachi Thompson, Miyako, from his Delmark album, “47th Street.”

I used to receive Jazz Record Mart’s monthly magazine/catalogue. I received it for many years. I ordered a lot of Delmark albums from it over a long period of time. Including several by Malachi Thompson. I enjoy his approach to trumpet playing, which is always thoughtful and never routine. 

Correct, sir!

 

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Some impressions:

Track 9 has a “McCoy Tyner in the 1970s” vibe for me. McCoy is obviously not on it, but it has that feel (which I love). The tenor sax player is a very high quality player. I can’t identify him. The bass and drums have listened a lot to Ron Carter and Tony Williams. The drummer plays with that Tony Willams style that Miles Davis called the “Rat Patrol” sound (after a mid-1960s TV show and its music). 

Track 10 is on the edge of post bop and avant garde where so much music I love resides. The trumpet player is very distinctive and soulful. The guitarist plays a nearly avant garde solo that holds together in a compelling way, full of tension. This group plays with a nice groove. I like this a lot.

Track 11 features a really good alto sax player playing a compelling solo. It reminds me of an anecdote about Lester Young on a JATP tour bus in the 1950s. A young bop saxophonist walked up to his seat and blew wild, fast bop licks in Lester’s face. Lester said “that’s nice but can you tell me a story?” The alto sax player on Track 11 is telling a story. 

Track 12 is a really together ensemble playing with feeling and with a nice groove. There is a sense of purpose here that is too often missing in jazz recorded after 1985, to pick a random date. 

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6 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

Some impressions:

Track 9 has a “McCoy Tyner in the 1970s” vibe for me. McCoy is obviously not on it, but it has that feel (which I love). The tenor sax player is a very high quality player. I can’t identify him. The bass and drums have listened a lot to Ron Carter and Tony Williams. The drummer plays with that Tony Willams style that Miles Davis called the “Rat Patrol” sound (after a mid-1960s TV show and its music). 

I get what you're saying, but this band (all of it) probably leans a little more towards post-bop than McCoy, though the connection is certainly there.

6 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

Track 10 is on the edge of post bop and avant garde where so much music I love resides. The trumpet player is very distinctive and soulful. The guitarist plays a nearly avant garde solo that holds together in a compelling way, full of tension. This group plays with a nice groove. I like this a lot.

You have nailed precisely why I included this track.  The whole album is not here, but it IS creative and worth the listen.

6 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

Track 11 features a really good alto sax player playing a compelling solo. It reminds me of an anecdote about Lester Young on a JATP tour bus in the 1950s. A young bop saxophonist walked up to his seat and blew wild, fast bop licks in Lester’s face. Lester said “that’s nice but can you tell me a story?” The alto sax player on Track 11 is telling a story. 

Again, precisely why this track was included.  You've pegged what makes this album special for me -- sounds like they give a damn.

6 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

Track 12 is a really together ensemble playing with feeling and with a nice groove. There is a sense of purpose here that is too often missing in jazz recorded after 1985, to pick a random date. 

Again, you are right on it.  Tracks 11+12 give me hope that the music I love is not dead, but in fact thriving in small pockets.

 

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Coming in just under the wire on this. Some killer stuff here as always Thom! I did listen a little bit ago while at work, and had hoped to write some comments about each track but this month has sadly been kind of a bitch. So all I can tell you is that the Marvin Gaye cut, which is beautiful, is from Louis Hayes' "Variety is the Spice" (which you introduced me to, of course), and there might be a cut on here from Rene McLean's "Watch Out" which I think I introduced you to? It's been a while since I've listened to that one but I *think* I heard something from it here.

This was a fun listen during a lousy workday! Will have to go back and re-listen when I have time. Thanks for putting this together and for letting me know to check it out!

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