JSngry

BFT 27 - DISC TWO DISCUSSION

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Disc Two might be a little more challenging, but it's also the Home Of The No-Brainer, so enjoy!

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1) Well, the alto player is announced, so no need to guess. I would admit however that in this context, I never would have ID'd him although a few of his signature licks are present. Sounds like a terrific party, way south of the border.

2) This track would be quite useful at Gitmo. Definitely NMCOT.

3) I'd rather hear Otis Redding on this one. Syrupy alto, not to my taste.

4) Billie Holiday standard, another one of those mysterious female vocalists you seem to favor.

5) Can say with absolute certainty that if that's not Freddie on tpt, I'll hang it up altogether. Can't ID anyone else, but Hubbard's favorite patterns are all over the place on this disc. Sounds like a post '60s date. "Without a Song", great tune.

All right, I'll listen some more. Would like to be more positive about these discs. Big Al, where are you?

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OK I'll bite.

#2

1: I know it’s got that intro but surely this isn’t Cannonball Adderley??? - I always hate those thingies that sound like an orangutang hooting (Airto Moreira uses one on Miles’ It’s About that Time). I’ll do a Dan Gould & say NMCOT here. Oh, hang on, 2:30 or so & we get a tart toned alto riffing over it, which as actually pretty nice. This whole track sounds like a bunch of prerecorded stuff & overdubs stuck together: I doubt it was really played “live”...? Alas, here comes the chorus & the trainwhistles again. Good lord this thing goes on forever. Well, I liked disc one a lot but this one starts with something I could do without...

2: Wow, that’s got to be the most out-of-the-ordinary opening to a sax+strings date I’ve ever heard. Fascinating stuff, even if it’s a bit cluttered. Hard to made sense of it as a coherent piece – is this adventurous film music, or just borrowing from film music?

3: a pretty-pretty version of “Try a Little Tenderness” w/ strings. S’nice; I got most out of the one-handed piano solo. Perhaps this is a track like the Clooney on the previous J.S. BFT where Jim’ll be making the (correct) point that strings do not necessarily = syrup, but still.......

4: Another Holiday-influenced vocalist (mixed way up, & definitely not as laid-back as Billie!!). No idea who anyone here is, it all sounds fine (except that bum note at the end of the piano solo), nothing that really gets me excited. I wish I could hear the sax more clearly, as he has a slight edge to his interaction with the singer (as if he's mocking her), & is the player on here I'm most interested in.

5: “Without a Song”. Weirdly thrashy racing bass & drums accompaniment. Lots of Hubbard licks in the trumpet solo but I don’t think it’s Freddie. Now, the tenor player – he gets me a lot more interested. Hang on, it’s surely Clifford Jordan. Ick, I hate the accompaniment, though. Not sure who any of these players are except Jordan. Oddly enough on the bridge during the opening head statement Jordan sounds like Warne Marsh. -- AMG search suggests that my tenor i.d. is wrong (& the real guy is a surprise) but I was nearly on the money on the trumpeter: is this the one?

6: I think this is more likely the work of overdubbing rather than a live two-piano situation, given that some of the repeated left-channel riffs seem “pre-set”. Pity about the muffled sound. Randy Weston meets Conlon Nancarrow! I really have no idea who this is.

7: A really nice big-band blues with soprano leading. Aside from saying that I think it's a good track I don't have a lot to comment. I normally love the sound of vinyl but this is one track where I feel that it'd be likely even more impressive if it got remastered. No idea who it is.

8: I have nothing much to say about this one, which isn’t to say I disliked it, just that despite the rhythmic ingenuity & some interesting sounds & textures I began to long for another lead instrument after a while. & then out of the blue comes the trombonist – huh?? A really good trombonist too, probably Ray Anderson. On that hunch I did a search & I think I got this one: here.

9: Yeeech, this one gets all my neanderthal “not synths!” instincts going, & I’m looking at the track time with a sigh & see that I’m in for the long haul.... Not quite sure what on earth we’re listening to – keyboards? electronic wind instrument? guitar? At least the sax is identifiable though it’s still somewhat processed. It's not that I hate this as that I just don't care.

10: damn odd: the tune sounds familiar from Tina Brooks' True Blue: "Nothing Ever Changes My Love for You", though they play it as if they were machinegunning it. Ugh. More of that more-is-more rhythm-section performance that Jim seems to love & I generally don't :D .... I don't know: it's all pretty frantic & exciting but are they "saying something" as the adage goes? No idea who this is, any of the players. -- A little searching suggests it's probably this one.

11: I ain't guessing on this one!

On the whole I liked disc 1 a whole lot more--Jim seems to have put the "weird" stuff on this one & the "nromal" stuff on #1, & while I like weird stuff too I like different weird stuff evidently. The one I'm more curious about is #2, the outerspace jazz+strings+trafficnoise track.

Edited by Nate Dorward

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Nate, #6 isn't overdubbed to my knowledge. Two pianos in real time.

The compressed sound is, unfortunately, courtesy of the original LP. This label seemed to favor that type sound on many of their releases, for who knows what reason. Most unfortunate...

And I think you (and others) will probably be surprised as to the identities of those involved on track 2. Not film music, nor borrowing from film music (not really), but...

I'll leave it at that for now. Let's just say that in this case, this might be considered "film music" in the sense that "hot jazz" might be considered "cartoon music"...

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A couple of beers and a bottle of wine later, here I come to embarrass myself. Two very different feels on the two discs, but I wouldn't say one was better or worse (except for track 9 on this one - see below). Either way, thanks as always to compilers and distributors. Great stuff. This is the first time I've ever been in on the "ground floor" of one of these. Fun.

Track 1: A giveaway? Not really a giveaway. I'd have to be somewhere I could dance like a fool to really listen to this. Reminds me of the feeling I get watching Black Orpheus: happy, maybe a little out of place, but not really caring. Would have been scared to guess the alto player without the help at the beginning. Don't know how anybody couldn't dig this: "happy people," indeed.

Track 2: This is a fascinating track - apparently the party is over, at least for all but the most die hard. This is the kind of thing that sends my girlfriend running from the room. I swear that sounds like Stan Getz (at 2:30 in or so), but I can't imagine under what what circumstances he would have recorded something like this. The two tenor blow out at the end is probably the most exciting two minutes of the entire BFT so far.

Track 3: Just beautiful (minus the hokey keys - though mercifully mixed way down). I imagine many will say "ick," but the bottle of wine I'm drinking tells me "awwww.... damn." There is a faint echo of revivalism in the rhythm section: listen to the steady strum of the guitar player. This is wedding dance-worthy, and I mean that in the best way. Probably a sax player I own stuff by, but can't blindly ID.

Track 4: Great obligatti by the tenor. Don't know my singers very well, obviously. Fine bop-based piano. What is that quote at 2:20? That's gonna drive me crazy: well-known standard. Like the mix of fine articulation and off-kilter pitch in the singer; just this side of the contrived singing that bothers me so much. Not great, but a fun listen.

Track 5: The stuttering, funk/blues-inflected trumpet phrases say Freddie Hubbard to me; and another standard I should know. Same tenor from the last track? This really cooks, and is an album I will buy once revealed - worth the 12+ minutes. Knowing Jim's love for the Marsh, I quickly thought that in the head, but the solo proved me wrong. Great left-hand bumpy work in the piano solo. If this is Hubbard, no wonder he busted his chops at some point; absolutely blistering. Like I said, I will buy this.

Track 6: Guess I should think this is exciting, but it kind of wears on me; think I'm just not in the right mood. Like where the piano in the left channel is playing that balladic stuff around 3-4 minutes in and the right channel keeps going with that incessant line. Kind of Stanley Cowell-ish, but I'm tired after listening to this one (unlike most Cowell I've heard). Not enough direct interplay for me.

Track 7: How many sopranos are there, really? Feel like I should know this one, eerily familiar. Again, I'd liek to hear the whole album here: reminds me of the Akiyoshi-Tabackin big band, one of my favorites. Too short to say much else, but it hits that special spot.

Track 8: Nice African influence (bass & percussion), via the Caribbean (steel pans). Sounds like an Ibrahim (Brand) percussion section (the ostinato especially), and makes me want a cool drink and the beach. Most importantly, this is the kind of band I'd like to be in, cause iot would just be so much damn fun to play in. A quick Google search brings up Andy Narell; maybe him? The 'bone solo is fantastic. Really nice, sustained groove.

Track 9: Oh God... no. Is it bad if I laughed? Totally kills my mood. An 11 minute track approximately.... 11 minutes too long. You have better taste than me, but this makes me wonder. I mean God, I even like Rush, but this is dreadful. Even sounds like Sonny Rollins on tenor, in slightly calypso mood (I guess the connection with the last track), but as if you put late-Rollins in a blender, with only the worst elements, just to see what came out. If that is a keytar, I might just take back all the nice things I said about this test. Seriously, I am now interested for the answers just to see what possible justification there is for this monstrosity. Next...

Track 10: Whew... much better. A little Lifetime-y in the rhythm section. Oh my jeezus, if I couldn't get George Adams from that tenor, I'd hang it up. I think? All that time spent with the Pullen-Adams group must be worth something: love his rootsy, swirling and totally surprising approach. No idea about the rest of the group, but seems worth a listen. 2:00-2:30 give the tenor as Adams to me. Not exactly my cup of tea, but I'd like to hear how they handle some different tempos, etc. beofre I hang it up. This is a tune Clifford Brown recorded but I can't come up with the name.

Track 11: Not much to say here. Didn't really need it, but I assume you had a reason.

Whew... 2 discs of fun, with a lot of great tunes in there. I really appreciate your broad taste, even within a "jazz" context, and imagine it would be fun to drink a 6 pack at your place, digging through your LP collection. Interested to see what others have to say.

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I can see right now (as I could when I did the compiling...) that Track 9 os gonna be a, er.... "tough sell". :g:g:g

No matter. I can see how the instrumentation/textures will put some (most? all?) y'all off, but afaic, what's being played us a total gas. Not at all cliched, extremely creative, actually more than a little wack in places (check those keyboard lines in the solo, and the tenor attacks/articulations), and totally fun. I put it in because it's a pretty goofy piece of music, goofy in the "how the hell did they come up with THIS crazy shit?" kind of way. Not but a handful of musicians could come up with what constitutes the innards of this one, never mind playing it like they do. It ain't a buncha fuzoid kids fresh outta Berklee, if you know what I mean.

But hey, that's just me. Pretty much expected a lot of derision on this one, so no hard feelings at all if everybody dumps all over it. But I will predict this - sooner or later, somebody will name the players, and everybody's opinions will remain exactly the same. ;)

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As for Track 11, the closer, nah, didn't really have a reason, other than as a goof and that I like the way it ends the disc. Old hippies don't die, they just resort to studio gimmickry, doncha' know!

But I can tell you this - if you aren't familiar the original album, you'll most likely never guess who it is. :crazy::crazy::crazy:

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Here goes nuttin...

Disc 2:

1. Whoa... like most of disc 1, this one’s new to me too. One can NOT have too much Cannonball (a scientifically proven fact), but I’d have to say that this one doesn’t do as much for me as his Bossa Nova album... but then I’ve never been to Carnaval, and can’t dance, so what the hell do I know. :) Not really a big samba / extended rhythm party kind of guy, I guess. This is fun in its own way, though, and a heck of a document. No doubtaboutit.

2. Well, this definitely sets a mood... just not the kind of mood I’m generally after. I did enjoy the “middle” part, though (the third minute or so, roughly speaking). Hey, that’s something. :)

3. “TALT”. Lush. The first thing that popped into my head was “Robert Farnon”. That’s probably wrong, but that’s who I was reminded of, in terms of the sound and the arrangement. Not a favorite tune of mine yet, but this could help to move it up the ladder. As for the saxoffonist, no real clue... yet.

4. EJ, and I do not mean to imply that this is Eddie Jefferson. <_< Now, although I’ve always thought that I do not much care for this singer (this EJ that is, I dig Eddie Jefferson), her voice seems to be somewhat less annoying to me as I listen to this (nice compliment, eh? :rolleyes: ). See, I’ve always associated a certain “whiny” sound to her. I still hear it here, but it’s not bugging me as much as usual. Well, maybe there’s hope for me after all. Obvious what the tune is (another one that’s not a fave of mine)... but I don’t know who’s accompanying EJ here.

5. Without A... Clue as to who is playing here (but I do know the tune, and this one is closer to being a fave). This sounds like a post-1990ish recording to me (and I don’t attach any judgements to that automatically, BTW... I can get into Criss Cross just as much as any more venerable label, as long as the music is good). This is good, in my book. I’m dealing with some distractions as I try to listen to this (would somebody tell that guy to QUIT with the leaf blower?) and jot down these notes, but I think I may dig this even more upon further spins.

6. Interesting... at first the tune sounded familiar, but the arrangement has me guessing. This style of playing isn’t my favorite, but it’s fun to be challenged this way, and I find this to be pretty tasty. I’m not a Keith Jarrett fan, but this style reminds me of him. Pretty chords and pretty colors, though, I have to say. Thought I caught some Richard Rodgers-like colors at certain moments...

7. Oooh, yeah. This reminds me of Oliver Nelson, though I don’t recognize it specifically as such. Soprano... soprano... Nelson played soprano too, I believe... but I don’t know this recording. Man, this is fantastic... oh, SHIT- it’s OVER already! Ohhhh, mannnnnnnnnnn!!! That’s just wrong.

8. I remember the first time I heard steel drums (I hope that’s what this is), I was immediately attracted to the sound. I’ve since decided that I like them best in small doses, however (let’s see how long this goes...). Yeah, that was short enough for me. ;) Nice ‘bone work too. I don’t think I’d buy it, but then I’m getting cheaper all the time.

9. Not a style that I’m crazy about, but for what it is, I have to say this is quite well-executed. Was this born out of Sonny’s “Don’t Stop The Carnival” kind of a vibe? I don’t know a lot about this style, obviously. Anyway, too much emphasis here on rhythm for my taste, and 11 minutes is just way too much for me (probably blissful to a lot of folks, though, so I can at least be happy about that :)).

10. NECMLFY (better known as NeckUMlify). This is a nice tune... I just wish they had played it a tad slower (fast is fine, but this is too fast for me). I don’t like the screechy style, not by a trumpet, not by a sax, not no way nohow... I do not like them Sam I am. Pretty impressive musicianship, of course (if I could play that fast, I’d probably do it too :D).

11. Hey... what the... you didn’t tell us the disc was going to self destruct! RUN FOR YOUR LIVES!!!

:mellow: hmm... at first I was reminded of “My little GTO”, but before I could figure out what it really was, it... just... sped off...

Whew, Fun stuff, Jim. The leaf blower’s gone... time to go back to track 1...

Thanks to Jim, and also to the antlered one (you know who you are) for sending the discs along.

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And I think you (and others) will probably be surprised as to the identities of those involved on track 2. Not film music, nor borrowing from film music (not really), but...

I'll leave it at that for now. Let's just say that in this case, this might be considered "film music" in the sense that "hot jazz" might be considered "cartoon music"...

I take you mean that it's formal contemporary classical music?

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Real quickly, wanted to say that I've spun both discs today and really enjoyed them. An ecclectic and wildly entertaining collection of tunes - as I've come to expect from Jim.

I'll be listening to both discs over the next few days as well, but I'm hitting the road tomorrow and won't get a chance to post my comments until early next week. But so far I'm really digging what I'm hearing. Many thanks to Jim and Mark for the discs... :tup

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A quick post on my impressions from yesterday.

Track 3 - Hank Crawford - after he left Atlantic (Kudu or where he went after that) . He doesn't go into too much blowing here, but he wasn't supposed to. That wasn't the goal here. Playing the melody well is - and Hank does that. The rhythm section is subdued too, although it's probably the NYC crew of that era, (although I don't hear Purdie, Rainey) and they are pretty much cooling it - also per production values. I'd guess this to be from the middle to late 70s. You could call it a precursor to "smooth" jazz.

I pretty much stopped buying Hank's stuff after the Atlantic period. My fav from Atlantic is "Mr. Blues plays Lady Soul". Hank live in the studio front of a swingin' big band with the rhythm section cooking !

Track 4- Etta Jones and Houston Person. Swingin' and warm. Just what it was supposed to be and pretty much what they sounded like in person.

Track 7 - this is bugging me. I should know this. Gotta listen more today.

Track 8 - is that a Kalimba or is it steel drums ? I think Kalimba. Is the bone Steve Turre? Beautiful chops!. Is it his record?

Track 9 - this is the track that nobody digs...well ...I dig it. Don't know who it is, but I'm curious. The bass sounds like Jaco, but doesn't display the prodigious technique, so I guess it's not him. This is FUSION in the good sense of the term afaic. I dig the keyboards and whoever is doing the organ sounds is on the money and keeping it interesting - putting the the church/gospel element in there.

More listening today.

Edited by Harold_Z

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1. So this track should be a "gimme," but this sure doesn't sound like any Cannonball I've heard. Ok, there's the alto...this sounds like he was overdubbed onto the latin band we heard at the beginning of the track. They don't sound totally in sync. Kind of an odd track, really.

2. Ok, another one of those "machine guns / strings / sax blow outs" that seems ubiquitous these days. What a bizarre track. Is this "live" or an assemblage? I'm really curious to read who this is.

3. a little too lush and overly sweet for my tastes. Not really my cup of tea. The sax is ok, but still bordering on schmaltz.

4. someone very influenced by Billie Holliday. Not really my cup of tea.

5. This is more like it. Early on, the rhythm section seems out of sync with the horns. They (the rhythm section) are a freight train, out of control running down the tracks and the horns are trying to stay on for dear life. Freddie Hubbard? No clue on the tenor, although I really enjoy his playing.

6. dual pianos, no clue who this is. Out of ignorance I would guess Jarrett, but don't think that is correct. I go back and forth on my estimation of this track, so I could see myself either loving or hating this album.

7. I really liked this track. Soprano, which should narrow things down a bit, but I'm not hearing enough to go on to identify anyone.

8. Another bizarre track. Steel drum / percussion…the track quiets down, and then the trombone kicks in. What an odd song. I’d have to guess Ray Anderson, based on the quirkiness, and this doesn’t sound like Weirbos, definitely someone American.

9. Ouch, that synth is horrible. I want to give this track a chance, but the synth is killing this one for me. Really cheesy, awful. And over 11 minutes long, too. I’m hearing nothing redeeming here. Everything is processed to death. I would use this track as an example of the worst excesses of over-production and dated effects. This is one of the reasons people hate fusion. In some ways this almost sounds like something Prince would have done in the 80’s. The writing is different, which helps, but not enough to redeem the track in any way. Ugh.

10. Another track where the rhythm section sounds like they had way too much caffeine and can barely contain themselves. Quite a breakneck pace they are setting. I’m really enjoying the tenor. Was this recorded live? I would have loved to have seen this band in person.

11. This sounds like a brief studio excerpt from the recording of In A Silent Way. Based on that I'll guess Zawinul.

What a bizarre disc, Jim! I had a lot of fun listening to this, even to the tracks I didn't really enjoy. Nicely done!

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And I think you (and others) will probably be surprised as to the identities of those involved on track 2. Not film music, nor borrowing from film music (not really), but...

I'll leave it at that for now. Let's just say that in this case, this might be considered "film music" in the sense that "hot jazz" might be considered "cartoon music"...

I take you mean that it's formal contemporary classical music?

Not quite an apt analogy on my part, I'm afraid. What I meant to imply was that this is a work by somebody who was thoroughly grounded in 20th Century "classical" music, and who brought that grounding to their work in other arenas, although never as strongly as on this piece.

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The love for Track 9 continues to grow! :g:g:g

A lot of "I'd have never guessed it was Cannonball if I didn't know upfront it was him", which is why I included it. But more about that when the answers get posted.

Still no ID of Track 3, but I'm sure it's jsut a matter of time (as it is for the beloved Track 9 :g )

VERY interesting to read the guesses/comments on Track 6 (none of which are even remotely correct :crazy: ). Keep'em comin'!

Joh B hit on something very interesting re: Track 11, something that I also noticed when pulling this album out for this compilation. But no, this cut actually predates IASW, and Zawinul is nowhere in sight!

As with Disc one, reading the comments is very enjoyable. Glad that mich of the music is proving to be, in various turns, enjoyable, challenging, and unfamiliar. Some good detective work done so far as well.

Looking forward to reading more posts!

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Oh yeah, listening with the accompaniment of a leaf-blower is entirely optional!

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Still no ID of Track 3

NOT HANK ?!!

Then it must be SAM BOURNE !!

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re: Track 11, something that I also noticed when pulling this album out for this compilation. But no, this cut actually predates IASW, and Zawinul is nowhere in sight!

Does the rest of the album have this same sound or is this cut an aberration?

I'll try to get my comments on disc #1 posted tomorrow.

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Not quite an apt analogy on my part, I'm afraid. What I meant to imply was that this is a work by somebody who was thoroughly grounded in 20th Century "classical" music, and who brought that grounding to their work in other arenas, although never as strongly as on this piece.

OK, I'll await the answers to find out more....! I can think of a few names who'd fit the bill loosely (e.g. Roger Kellaway, Mel Powell....) but nothing that strikes me as obvious.

Just posted revisions to my original responses to fill in the few tracks I missed the first time round & finish off a sentence I left hanging.

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re: Track 11, something that I also noticed when pulling this album out for this compilation. But no, this cut actually predates IASW, and Zawinul is nowhere in sight!

Does the rest of the album have this same sound or is this cut an aberration?

I'll try to get my comments on disc #1 posted tomorrow.

The whole album is an abberation, actually...

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Not quite an apt analogy on my part, I'm afraid. What I meant to imply was that this is a work by somebody who was thoroughly grounded in 20th Century "classical" music, and who brought that grounding to their work in other arenas, although never as strongly as on this piece.

OK, I'll await the answers to find out more....! I can think of a few names who'd fit the bill loosely (e.g. Roger Kellaway, Mel Powell....) but nothing that strikes me

Two good, but incorrect, guesses, although one leads you closer to the answer than the other...

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1. Exciting occasion no doubt. Have to be there and under the influence of something to enjoy it.

2. Is it a fire at the beginning? I was prepared to dislike this but as it went I found it growing on me just a little. Not something I would choose to listen to though.

3. Try a Little Tenderness. Schmaltzy. Don’t recognize the alto or piano.

4. What a Little Moonlight Can Do. Voice is a little familiar but don’t know her. Like the piano.

5. Without a Song. Sounds like Woody Shaw, although there’s a trademark Hubbard horse neigh effect. Favourite track on the disc for me.

6. Piano duet? No idea.

7. Don’t recognize the sop sax. Quite nice.

8. Steel drums. No idea about this either.

9. I avoid this kind of thing normally. Monotonous.

10. Can’t appreciate this at all.

11. Ditto.

Lots that I like here even though I am stony ground for much of it too. Thanks a lot for a different and noteworthy BFT, Jim.

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Hopefully, people who haven't yet posted about Disc Two will do so, but if not, hey, that's cool too.

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OK, I'm ready to commit on the 2nd disc. Here goes:

1. On first listen it seemed like Jim was playing a trick on us, splicing a Cannonball intro onto a Brazilian recording. But it seems that this is Cannonball, such at it is. I love the early Cannonball, but wasn’t moved by his solo here. No idea who the singer is. At the end, we do hear Cannonball’s voice.

2. Is this one of Ornette’s things with strings? Very busy and cacophonous. NMCOT

3. “Try a Little Tenderness” Listened to this all the way through, and while I liked the alto player, couldn’t put a name on him. Later it occurred to me that this may be Cannonbball, perhaps from his “Lush Life” albums with strings? Lovely playing.

4. “What a Little Moonlight Can Do” Yes! The late great Etta Jones, in marvelous voice! Assume the tenor is Houston Person. I saw Etta only once, not long before she died, and was gassed.

5. “Without a Song” Freddie Hubbard, from his great “The Hub of Hubbard” album. Eddie Daniels, tenor, Louis Hayes on drums, Richard Davis on bass, can’t remember the piano. Freddie is in great form on this!

6. How many pianos here? I hear at least three, but maybe there are more. It seems like this would work best if one were sitting in the middle with all the pianos surrounding the listener. Might this be the Piano Choir from their Strata-East record? I recall that Stanley Cowell was on that date, can only guess who else.

7. A nice soprano player, good arrangement, although no names pop into my head. Does Bunky Green play soprano as well as alto? I promised myself I wouldn’t cheat by looking anywhere.

8. Althouigh I’m sure there must be others, the only jazz steel pan player I can think of is Andy Narell, although I’m not saying this is him. The trombonist can hit some high notes, and having played trombone I know how hard that is, but overall I think his playing is sloppy. The rhythm section gets a nice groove.

9. If you can’t say something nice………………

10. The tune is vaguely familiar, I think. The band spends too much time playing the head, and not enough time blowing. The soloists try to build excitement too quickly. If everybody had been given a little more time to develop their ideas, and not been in such a hurry to achieve orgasm, this might have been more satisfying. It’s all a bit cluttered.

11. Oh man, this is like, so far out. You don’t know what you’re doing to my head!

An eclectic selection, to say the least, Jim.

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9. Was this born out of Sonny’s “Don’t Stop The Carnival” kind of a vibe? 

Can't say that I know, but that's an interesting stylistic link. I definitely heard the "Latin" undercurrent running through it, and that's what prompted me to to pull it and sequence it after the more overtly Latin Track 8. As noted before, initial selection/sequencing was very much spur-of-the-moment, and what you hear in terms of stylistic affinity must've been akin to what I was hearing/feeling at the moment.

And the selection of Track 10 springs directly from this Track 9, for several reasons!

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Track 1 Is this Cannonball?? To my ear it sounds more like Phil Woods in need of a blood alcohol test. In any event, I like this track a lot. Everyone’s having fun.

Track 2 This could be a cut from a war protesting album like Charlie Haden’s liberation music orchestra, although it is not LMO. At the same time I have a strong feeling that I have seen a movie with this music…

Track 3 David Sanborn. “Try a Little Tenderness” from “Pearls” He was a hero for many college altoists of ‘80s including myself. This CD is too mellow for me to hear Sanborn so I have played it only a few times. I guess he wanted to make a “with strings” album of his own.

Track 4 No clue.

Track 5 Sounds like Freddie Hubbard although the tone lacks his presence somehow (it sounds brighter and lighter). Probably it is just because of the recording, which is too echowy. Buster Williams on bass.

Track 6 Paul Bley and Michael Nyman doing duet… Very farfetched.

Track 7 It seems that the arranger got the idea of this opening from Oliver Nelson’s Stolen Moments. I could imagine hearing this at the end credit of a ‘70s movie. No idea on the soprano sax.

Track 8 Nice relaxing track for a hot summer day. Good trombone player.

Track 9 “Db Waltz” from “Domino Theory” by Weather Report. I don’t know why I remember this track so well as if I had heard it yesterday. I have not heard it for a long time. Probably it is because I heard it when I was absorbing everything eagerly. Lately I am having a hard time remembering a new song. Ugh!

Track 10 Jack DeJohnette on drums. The bass sounds like Stanley Clarke. Chick Corea on Rhodes. Wait a second… is this George Adams on tenor?? Yes it’s him. And who is this high note trumpet player? Jon Faddis or Marvin Peterson?? Hmm…my guess is getting only wilder but I would like to hear the whole album when I find it out.

Track 11 Funny and quirky track Steve Swallow and Carla Bley would play. I was smiling to hear this one closing this interesting disc.

Disc two has more divergent styles of music and I liked the variety a lot. I would like to hear the rest of albums from which you took some of these tracks. Thanks for the fun, Jim.

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