Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
mrjazzman

Art Blakey's favorite/best messenger group

12 posts in this topic

i've been told that blakey has said timmons, golson, morgan, and merritt was his favorite or best messenger group. can anyone verify that?...............

Edited by mrjazzman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes he would introduce groups as "the best dammned jazz messengers since 1963", so that one was pretty high up there.

Although it redefined their sound and approach, the band with Golson didn't spend all that much time together.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good as that group was, I heard that Blakey didn't care for the sometimes complicated drum charts that Golson wrote.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's my favorite. Just wish somebody had recorded them in this config...

April 1969: Woody Shaw-tpt; Tyrone Washington-tsx; George Cables-p; Scotty Holt-b

source (scroll down)

Edited by Rooster_Ties

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I kind of liked the Blakey band with (first) Hank Mobley in the tenor chair, and (later) Wayne Shorter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite was Hubbbard/Fuller/Shorter/Walton/Workman/Blakey, second was W.Marsalis/Watson/Pierce/Williams/Fambrough/Blakey (especially enjoyed Watson's writing for the Messengers, especially "Time Will Tell"). I wish all of the groups between "Indestructible" and "Gypsy Folk Tales" had been recorded more/better. Would have loved to hear more than one semi-bootleg of Billy Harper in the group, would have liked to have heard better what Gary Bartz brought to the group.

Edited by felser

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought it was funny that when Blakey introduced the Clifford Brown, and Lou Donaldson period, he said when they get too old, I'm gonna get me some younger ones. Then he says, I hope to work with them forever.

Just puzzled me..

Anyway, any group he had with Lee Morgan was great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

he said when they get too old, I'm gonna get me some younger ones.

And he kept getting him some younger ones. I saw him live at Penn's Landing a few months before he passed, and Brian Lynch was with him on trumpet and his playing smoked! I was less impressed with some of the other players (a very young Geoff Keezer, the ever-puzzling Javon Jackson). Steve Davis was very good on trombone, and he had a second tenor player, Dale somebody, who played well. I forget who the bass player was, I'm thinking maybe Essiett O. Essiett.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good as that group was, I heard that Blakey didn't care for the sometimes complicated drum charts that Golson wrote.

Golson told me one night last week that blakey didn't want to do blues march("I don't want to do no march")until golson convinced him that it was a blues and that everything would be alright. It turned out to be one of their biggest hits. Golson had just joined the band and had convinced blakey to let him be it's director.........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked the Wayne Shorter/Morgan period with or without Curtis Fuller

In fact I liked all of them up until the mid to late 70s really

I really liked the prestige sides like Childs Dance but the Blue Notes cap it for me...excellent all round

Edited by andybleaden

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[Golson told me one night last week that blakey didn't want to do blues march("I don't want to do no march")until golson convinced him that it was a blues and that everything would be alright. It turned out to be one of their biggest hits. Golson had just joined the band and had convinced blakey to let him be it's director.........

Golson was already a well-respected composer and arranger when he joined the band, Morgan was 19 years old, and Timmons hadn't written any of his signature tunes yet, so it shouldn't have been too much of a stretch for him to become the director. If memory serves, Golson recruited the other guys (Morgan, Timmons, Merritt), who were all from Philly. Timmons had been out on the west coast with Chet Baker and hadn't written (or at least recorded) his signature stuff yet and Morgan had been in Dizzy's big band, blowing away listeners with his break in Tunisia. I heard Blakey twice in the '85-'90 period, and he did "Blues March" (and "Moanin'") both times. I've never particularly cared for "Blues March", but "Moanin'" is the hard bop national anthem, as far as I'm concerned. Timmons wrote some great stuff in that era ("Moanin'", "This Here", "Dat Dere", etc.).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Golson version is one of my favorites although the Shorter group is probably the best. Not really the JMs is the group on the Birdland albums. It's hard to beat the starpower of that five, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.