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CJ Shearn

Kenny Burrell's "Phinupi"

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with the talk we did earlier on in my jazz in American music class this semester about rhythm changes (not the chords themselves just recognizing the sound of the progression) is this tune based on it? I've been able to spot rhythm changes a lot more often now. wow, I haven't listened to this for a long time, Louis Smith is a killer.

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Sounds like "rhythm" to me! Rhythm can be played so many different ways it's sometimes hard to tell. The bridge seems to adhere to the general form. This song really cooks! Thanks for reminding me about this fine tune.

As an aside, next time your watching the Cartoon Network check out the Flintstones theme song, a pretty hip little rhythm tune.

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CJ:

In all my jazz listening so far, I've not been able to ascertain exactly what "rhythm changes" sound like. I know it means it is based on the chord progression of "I Got Rhythm" but I can't say I know that song (that's pre-1950, right? Not an era I have listened to much) and haven't been able to isolate the pattern. So, whatever you have learned recently that made it "click" for you, I'd greatly appreciate you sharing that info. Thanks!

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well, Parkertown, how to hear rhythm changes? heres the best way a non muso but critical listener like me can explain: first, count the number of bars in the tune. each head or "A" section of a rhythm changes tune has 8 bars. The "B" section or bridge is another 8 bars, and there is commonly no written melodyt, mainly an improv. then you head back to the "A". On "Phinupi" you'll notice Duke Jordan improvises on the "B" section, so it is what's an AABA 32 bar tune. Another example is "Oleo". Also, keep the melody "I Got Rhythm" in mind, it can help you hear the form of the tune. Also learned a simpler way of hearing blues changes.. the standard blues progression is I-IV-I-V-I. what that means is the root of the chord is "I" which lasts for four beats, then the chord shifts to the "IV" position, four steps away from the "I". the "IV" chord moves back to the "I" chord, the "I" to the "V", then back to the "I". Newk's "Blue Seven" is an example of a blues progression which is ambiguous b/c it isn't clear where the bass line that opens it up is moving sometimes and also the bizarre Monkish theme which propels it, picking notes that seem quite unrelated and making a very logical thematic statement...... well, that's how my professor analyzes it anyway. Some of the theory stuff to me is like "huh" but once I heard examples these things suddenly made sense.

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The more rhythm you hear the better you will be able to recognize the form. Here are some examples of rhythm tunes...

Jumpin' At The Woodside

Anthropology

Flying Home

The Theme

The Serpent's Tooth

Dexterity

Kim

Ah-Leu-Cha

One Bass Hit

Salt Peanuts

Seven Come Eleven

Eternal Triangle (This one has a very interesting bridge)

Cottontail

There's original rhythm which is more or less based on "I Got Rhythm" changes. There's what's sometimes referred to as "Jazz Rhythm" which typically uses diminished chords in the first 2 bars of the A-section. Then there's rhythm with alterations which is a catch-all category for everthing else.

A typical rhythm bridge starts on the major third of the primary key and cycles up a perfect forth every two bars. Another common approach to the bridge is a chromatically descending theme, starting on the major 3 of the primary key and descending a half-step every two bars. Then there's the eternal triangle bridge which breaks all the "rules". There's also the "Sears and Roebuck" bridge which is a bridge based on I-IV-V blues changes with a secondary dominant thrown in. Hopefully this isn't too technical. But a little information on form may help you recognize the sound of rhythm.

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Eternal Triangle (This one has a very interesting bridge)

Sundog,

You've got me interested now! I don't have my CD with me, and I can't 'hear' the bridge in my head! How does the channel of this one go?

Cheers!

Red

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Red,

The Eternal Triangle bridge is a unique non-traditional way to play through the bridge in rhythm. In the key of Bb here's the progression...

| B-7 | E7 | Bb-7 | Eb7 |

|A-7 D7| Ab-7 Db7| G-7 C7| F#-7 B7|

It's begins on B-7 and cycles to it's related dominant chord (E7) then does the same thing a half step lower in bars 3-4 (Bb to Eb). Bars 5-8 are just a a series of descending ii-V progressions. Pretty slick little bridge. I believe this song was written by Diz and Sonny Stitt. Kudos to them for thinking outside the box.

I don't know of another case in which this bridge was actually utilized in an original tune. However, I do know that players will call for it, just to mess with newbie jazzbos in jam sessions. Yes, I have been victimized. :D

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Many thanks CJ and Sundog! Thanks for helping me with my learning...

I don't really understand it yet though, but I will try to listen to the tracks mentioned and apply what you've said.

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Thanks Sundog,

I'll have to try that one out; it looks pretty interesting. It 's almost, but not quite, substituting its way around the normal bridge, except up a fifth...hmmm. Pretty cool...

...Unless you're on the receiving end when it's called - that's a bit unkind!

Thanks again, much appreciated!

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thanks Parkertown. I'm glad my very basic explanation was helpful.

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| B-7 | E7 | Bb-7 | Eb7 |

|A-7 D7| Ab-7 Db7| G-7 C7| F#-7 B7|

Okay guys, feel free to tell me if this is a totally obvious and/or stupid question but I'm pretty sure I've heard Monk employ this half-step ii-V idea in ALOT of his compositions, but I don't think he restricted himself to just the bridge...

Also, my brain wants to interperet the above progression as a string of tritone subs leading to the tritone sub of F7...

Do I have it all wrong??

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