tkeith

BFT #101 Discussion

41 posts in this topic

Sorry for the delay, folks. I was away for part of the weekend and didn't want to walk on the previous test. I think everybody has it (Bill, your redux is in the mail) now. Feel free to let 'er rip.

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I just want to be first for a change.

The last track of the BFT is the first track here.

(Another composition from this disc figured in my BFT 84.)

That's the only ID I've got so far.

More comments and silliness later. I just wanted to be the annoying first guy.

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Yes, but in my mind, it'll always be the first track from here, an album I purchased for 88¢ at Looney Tunes in Boston.

:tophat:

Also, in a private conversation, webbcity ID'd that and another song, but he's being shy... or just saving up for a one-shot post.

Edited by Thom Keith

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Okay, here we go...go easy on me... :excited:

Track 1 - The tune is Sonny Rollins' "Don't Stop the Carnival" but I can't identify any of the players. I'm sure I know some of them and will feel stupid when I find out, but oh well. The presence of the cello did make me think of Ahmed Abdullah's bands, and the trumpet player even sounds a bit like him, but I wouldn't bet money on that. Great performance! Love it.

Track 2 - Great stuff! Of course it's "Lonely Woman". As to WHO it is, the first obvious guess would be Billy Bang on violin but what's confusing me is that the bass player sounds like Sirone to me, and then you would think Leroy Jenkins would be on violin, and that's definitely not Jenkins... ? Still does sound like Billy Bang though. Not sure on the others. Fantastic version of this tune though.

Track 3 - "Dervish" by Eight Bold Souls...Ed Wilkerson Jr., Mwata Bowden, Dushun Mosley, Naomi Millender, et.al. Great album, just picked this one up recently...weird coincidence! This one is a lot harder to find than their others...their first record, I think? These guys always have a hint of Threadgill to my ears, and that's a good thing. And that's not to say they're not original, they sure as hell are! Saw Wilkerson perform in Chicago once and it was mindblowing. Mwata Bowden too, what a phenomenal musician.

Track 4 - This is a "stealth" recording, isn't it? If that's the case, then my guess is "The Cookers", based on inside info I have about you. ;) What a band!

Track 5 - Hmmm...I like this tune a lot. The piano player sounds a lot like Stanley Cowell at the beginning, at least harmonically. I don't think it's him though. Bass player has a Ron Carter sound going on, but it's obviously not Ron. No idea on the drummer. Damn this is tough! This one is killing me actually...I need to know who this is.

Track 6 - Oh man, this is right up my alley. The tune reminded me of Shamek Farrah at first but then the vocals came in and completely threw me off. I'm excited to find out who this is too. I'll make a wild guess that this is one of Eddie Henderson's bands or something but that's probably completely wrong. Definitely something from that period though...Norman Connors? Man, I'm dying to hear the answer to this one...

Track 7 - Love this one too, but again I've got no clue on the players. Love the tenor player...damn! Who the hell is that? Aha, trumpet...thought this was a trio. And an alto player too...they keep coming out of the woodwork. The alto player especially sounds like someone I should know. Sounds like he is taking a cue from Arthur Blythe. This is a really great group.

Track 8 - This has got to be Billy Harper, right? I'm still getting familiar with his playing, but from the opening notes it just sounds like one of his bands (and his compositional style too, from what I know). Love the bass solo! Another great one...where do you come up with all this stuff?

Track 9 - To be honest the tune is not exactly my cup of tea, but the saxophonist is killer. I'm guessing James Carter.

Track 10 - Wow, this one sounds really familiar but I can't place it. Nice tune. I'll leave it at that...am anxious to find out who this is.

Track 11 - Not even going to take a guess at this one either, but I like it! Great players all, whoever they are. Love the way the sax player builds his solo, and the drum solo is killin!

Track 12 - "Now is the Time" by Dick Griffin! With Clifford Jordan! 'Nuff said! As they used to say in Downbeat... Five Stars.

I always beat myself up about these things, and I'm sure I'll be shocked to learn what I missed, but that aside...these are some great picks! I just enjoyed listening. :)

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1. I like the instrumentation and the calypso feel underneath. The tenor is familiar and the trumpet seems to have some Cherryisms. I cant identify the track, but it was an enjoyable start.

2. Lonely Woman. In the beginning, the bassist manages to sound a bit like Haden. Not necessarily when it gets to the arco solo. Sounds like there could be multiple bassists and drummers. No, the two of them are just playing a lot of music. I am really enjoying the rumbling underneath the soloists. Nice tenor solo. The violin sounds too accomplished to be Ornette himself, but he/she is very effective. The violin sounded a lot like Billy Bang. Perhaps this is from the Jazz Doctors recording, Intensive Care with Frank Lowe Donald Rafael Garret and Denis Charles? I have heard a few tracks by this group and love it all. This is a great track.

3. It took me a few listens, but the tenor got me to thinking about Edward Wilkerson, so this must be 8 Bold Souls. Another band that I love. If it is not 8 Bold Souls, this band reminds me a lot of some of the Chicago ensembles I have heard. Fantastic solos by saxophone and trombone. Enthusiastic thumbs up for this one. Did you fade this out?

4. The piano feature in the beginning did not really grab my attention, but once the alto sax solo with who I believe to be Oliver Lake started, I was able to focus in. This sounds like a private recording of a live performance. That could be why the piano did not really get me too far in the background. Anyway, Lake always commands my attention in a good way! I can not identify the tenor saxophonist, but he/she makes a positive contribution to the proceedings. Once it got my attention, this was another enjoyable track despite the extra effort required because of the shortcomings in the sound.

5. Swinging relatively straight ahead piano trio. There is something familiar about the playing here. Enjoyable performance, but nothing specific making an impression on me at first listen.

6. I am pretty sure I have this. I think it is from a Clifford Jordan album. That is definitely who the tenor saxophonist sounds like. In a way the track sounds very much of its time the mid seventies but it is a sound I enjoy. Very soulful like it could be part of the sound track to one of the black exploitation films. None of the solos are particularly memorable, but the overall vibe works for me.

7. Tenor-bass-drums trio. I am most drawn to the foundation from the bassist. The tenor is solid and I imagine someone that I have heard, but the bassist here is holding this all together for me. Oh now there is a trumpet. Glad to hear because I am not sure the tenor would have held my attention for the full ten minutes. I hear some of the post Cherry splashiness in his/her playing that I typically enjoy. Oh and now an alto. Perhaps the most appealing sound and interesting improvisation of the three soloists so far. I would probably enjoy hearing more from this group.

8. Often I would really be into something like this. Maybe I am a little distracted, but right now it is not really doing much for me. Certainly passionate/energetic playing, but beyond acknowledging that … I guess I am looking for a tad bit more composition/structure/form other than the sketch we have here before everyone just goes for it. Like I said, there are times when I could just get caught up in the energy and expressive of the moment and not need anything more. This is just not one of those times. Maybe I will revisit this track when I am in a different mood.

9. I know this one. Darn it! What is it again? I am sure it is something I own. Is it the Leaders? Yes, I think so. Saw them at Sweet Basil around the time of this recording which is one of the Black Saint recordings. Big fan of this group. Arthur Blythe, Chico Freeman, Lester Bowie, Kirk Lightsey, Cecil McBee and Famadou Don Moye. Thanks for this!

10. Searching for something familiar, but nothing I can identify. The tenor at times sounds a little bit like Ricky Ford, but not enough to make me commit. Nice piano solo. Cant say I know who this is, but I do like it.

11. This sounds like one of those foundational things that I should know better than I do. Well played.

12. Another song that sounds a bit of its time. Soprano could be someone like Gary Bartz. Trying to get into the vibe as on track 6, but it is not happening for me this time later in the day. Norman Connors?

Edited by relyles

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#9 is an Arthur Blythe composition, which he has recorded more than once. Blythe is the alto sax soloist here. This version is with The Leaders--Blythe, Lester Bowie, Chico Freeman, Kirk Lightsey, Cecil McBee, Don Moye. I am going to try to find which album by The Leaders it is on--I don't have the albums with me now.

This is just great music!

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Boy, looks like I blew #9! Not that I'm surprised! ;)

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Okay, here we go...go easy on me... :excited:

Track 1 - The tune is Sonny Rollins' "Don't Stop the Carnival" but I can't identify any of the players. I'm sure I know some of them and will feel stupid when I find out, but oh well. The presence of the cello did make me think of Ahmed Abdullah's bands, and the trumpet player even sounds a bit like him, but I wouldn't bet money on that. Great performance! Love it.

Well, yes... and no. It actually NOT Don't Stop The Carnival, but as we both know, it sure as hell is. This actually predates my earliest recording of the tune by Newk by a year. That's a hint.

Track 2 - Great stuff! Of course it's "Lonely Woman". As to WHO it is, the first obvious guess would be Billy Bang on violin but what's confusing me is that the bass player sounds like Sirone to me, and then you would think Leroy Jenkins would be on violin, and that's definitely not Jenkins... ? Still does sound like Billy Bang though. Not sure on the others. Fantastic version of this tune though.

Spot on with Billy, but not the rest.

Track 3 - "Dervish" by Eight Bold Souls...Ed Wilkerson Jr., Mwata Bowden, Dushun Mosley, Naomi Millender, et.al. Great album, just picked this one up recently...weird coincidence! This one is a lot harder to find than their others...their first record, I think? These guys always have a hint of Threadgill to my ears, and that's a good thing. And that's not to say they're not original, they sure as hell are! Saw Wilkerson perform in Chicago once and it was mindblowing. Mwata Bowden too, what a phenomenal musician.

Correct. Reasonably certain only you would get this.

Track 4 - This is a "stealth" recording, isn't it?

Eh, could be...

If that's the case, then my guess is "The Cookers", based on inside info I have about you. ;) What a band!

Nope. Thought sure you'd nail the alto, and DEFINITELY should have nailed the tenor. You're going to be surprised by this one.

Track 5 - Hmmm...I like this tune a lot. The piano player sounds a lot like Stanley Cowell at the beginning, at least harmonically. I don't think it's him though. Bass player has a Ron Carter sound going on, but it's obviously not Ron. No idea on the drummer. Damn this is tough! This one is killing me actually...I need to know who this is.

It IS a great tune, and it IS Ron Carter.

Track 6 - Oh man, this is right up my alley. The tune reminded me of Shamek Farrah at first but then the vocals came in and completely threw me off. I'm excited to find out who this is too. I'll make a wild guess that this is one of Eddie Henderson's bands or something but that's probably completely wrong. Definitely something from that period though...Norman Connors? Man, I'm dying to hear the answer to this one...

You're going to be shocked when you find out who this one is. And you WILL need to have it.

Track 7 - Love this one too, but again I've got no clue on the players. Love the tenor player...damn! Who the hell is that? Aha, trumpet...thought this was a trio. And an alto player too...they keep coming out of the woodwork. The alto player especially sounds like someone I should know. Sounds like he is taking a cue from Arthur Blythe. This is a really great group.

Not sure if you know this guy, but he's definitely a guy who will maintain your interest. This is a sleeper cut.

Gah! Stupid limitations on blocks of text. I'll post the rest of my responses to your responses later.

Edited by Thom Keith

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1. I like the instrumentation and the calypso feel underneath. The tenor is familiar and the trumpet seems to have some Cherryisms. I can’t identify the track, but it was an enjoyable start.

2. “Lonely Woman”. In the beginning, the bassist manages to sound a bit like Haden. Not necessarily when it gets to the arco solo. Sounds like there could be multiple bassists and drummers. No, the two of them are just playing a lot of music. I am really enjoying the rumbling underneath the soloists. Nice tenor solo. The violin sounds too accomplished to be Ornette himself, but he/she is very effective. The violin sounded a lot like Billy Bang. Perhaps this is from the Jazz Doctors recording, Intensive Care with Frank Lowe Donald Rafael Garret and Denis Charles? I have heard a few tracks by this group and love it all. This is a great track.

Ding! Ding!

3. It took me a few listens, but the tenor got me to thinking about Edward Wilkerson, so this must be 8 Bold Souls. Another band that I love. If it is not 8 Bold Souls, this band reminds me a lot of some of the Chicago ensembles I have heard. Fantastic solos by saxophone and trombone. Enthusiastic thumbs up for this one. Did you fade this out?

I did not, but you're correct. webbcity has ID'd this cut.

4. The piano feature in the beginning did not really grab my attention, but once the alto sax solo with who I believe to be Oliver Lake started, I was able to focus in. This sounds like a private recording of a live performance. That could be why the piano did not really get me – too far in the background. Anyway, Lake always commands my attention – in a good way! I can not identify the tenor saxophonist, but he/she makes a positive contribution to the proceedings. Once it got my attention, this was another enjoyable track despite the extra effort required because of the shortcomings in the sound.

Correct, a private recording and it IS Oliver Lake.

5. Swinging relatively straight ahead piano trio. There is something familiar about the playing here. Enjoyable performance, but nothing specific making an impression on me at first listen.

This is maybe a hair outside of what you think of for this pianist, but only because of the way our minds seem to classify such things.

6. I am pretty sure I have this. I think it is from a Clifford Jordan album. That is definitely who the tenor saxophonist sounds like. In a way the track sounds very much of its time – the mid seventies – but it is a sound I enjoy. Very soulful – like it could be part of the sound track to one of the black exploitation films. None of the solos are particularly memorable, but the overall vibe works for me.

It IS Clifford and you've really nailed where this recording fits. It's not a great record, but a really enjoyable one nonetheless.

9. I know this one. Darn it! What is it again? I am sure it is something I own. Is it the Leaders? Yes, I think so. Saw them at Sweet Basil around the time of this recording – which is one of the Black Saint recordings. Big fan of this group. Arthur Blythe, Chico Freeman, Lester Bowie, Kirk Lightsey, Cecil McBee and Famadou Don Moye. Thanks for this!

Correct! ID'd in the next post.

10. Searching for something familiar, but nothing I can identify. The tenor at times sounds a little bit like Ricky Ford, but not enough to make me commit. Nice piano solo. Can’t say I know who this is, but I do like it.

Not Ricky.

12. Another song that sounds a bit of its time. Soprano could be someone like Gary Bartz. Trying to get into the vibe as on track 6, but it is not happening for me this time later in the day. Norman Connors?

Negative. ID'd by two listeners thus far.

Edited by Thom Keith

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Track 8 - This has got to be Billy Harper, right? I'm still getting familiar with his playing, but from the opening notes it just sounds like one of his bands (and his compositional style too, from what I know). Love the bass solo! Another great one...where do you come up with all this stuff?

Not Billy. I see where the writing might take you down that direction, but this is a bit more out than BH.

Track 9 - To be honest the tune is not exactly my cup of tea, but the saxophonist is killer. I'm guessing James Carter.

Another one that's going to surprise you. No JC on this BFT (though I considered it).

Track 10 - Wow, this one sounds really familiar but I can't place it. Nice tune. I'll leave it at that...am anxious to find out who this is.

People are going to either nail this one or be confused by it. It's a required recording from the period, IMHO, and the best recording of the tenor player, by far.

Track 11 - Not even going to take a guess at this one either, but I like it! Great players all, whoever they are. Love the way the sax player builds his solo, and the drum solo is killin!

This guy is one of the great unsung people in this music, and he should be a household name. Absolutely swings, always. You're going to want this one, but good luck finding it.

Track 12 - "Now is the Time" by Dick Griffin! With Clifford Jordan! 'Nuff said! As they used to say in Downbeat... Five Stars.

Ding! Ding!

I always beat myself up about these things, and I'm sure I'll be shocked to learn what I missed, but that aside...these are some great picks! I just enjoyed listening. :)

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4. The piano feature in the beginning did not really grab my attention, but once the alto sax solo with who I believe to be Oliver Lake started, I was able to focus in. This sounds like a private recording of a live performance. That could be why the piano did not really get me – too far in the background. Anyway, Lake always commands my attention – in a good way! I can not identify the tenor saxophonist, but he/she makes a positive contribution to the proceedings. Once it got my attention, this was another enjoyable track despite the extra effort required because of the shortcomings in the sound.

Correct, a private recording and it IS Oliver Lake.

Tarbaby?

6. I am pretty sure I have this. I think it is from a Clifford Jordan album. That is definitely who the tenor saxophonist sounds like. In a way the track sounds very much of its time – the mid seventies – but it is a sound I enjoy. Very soulful – like it could be part of the sound track to one of the black exploitation films. None of the solos are particularly memorable, but the overall vibe works for me.

It IS Clifford and you've really nailed where this recording fits. It's not a great record, but a really enjoyable one nonetheless.

My initial thought was that it came from the Inward Fire album, which was the first Clifford Jordan I owned.

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Here goes with the first half...

1. Calypso! For the first solo, another round of the age-old BFT question, is it a bass or a cello? I'll bite -- it's a cello, nice solo too. Nice tenor, somebody with a Paul Gonsalves influence – Ricky Ford, Toby Delius? The straight-four swing part of this tune's bridge is borrowed from the bridge of "Well You Needn't." This is a fun way to start.

2. "Lonely Woman" of course, played with reverence. The violin has me thinking Billy Bang. A Google search leads me to think it's from this album. The timing and instrumentation seem to match. I don't have the record. Wish I did, especially if this cut is on there.

3. Lotsa brass, and another bowed instrument that sounds more and more like a cello as it goes on. Are we going to have bowed instruments on every tune of this BFT? OK with me! I don't have a guess, though it keeps nudging at me as if we were familiar...

4. A "location" recording, from a seat closer to the drums than to the piano. Nice piano, nice arrangement. I'll cop to not liking the alto solo, which tries too hard to build climaxes and just sounds forced. Is that Gary Bartz? The tenor solo has a much nicer flow. The drum solo, rare at this tempo, really works.

5. For some reason I can't put my finger on, I'm thinking Larry Willis. And older recording on a piano that's a little creaky. But still worth hearing.

6 Oh, why do they bury singers in instrumental doublings like this? I heard the same thing happen in a live setting not long ago. The singer had taken pains to write words to Joe Henderson's "Inner Urge," but two saxes insisted on playing along, and you can't make out a single word. The tenor here has gotta be Clifford Jordan, absolutely gotta be. I have almost all the Jordan records but can't turn up this tune in my collection. Must be from "Inward Fire," one of the few I'm lacking.

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I'm such a dope...#6 IS from Inward Fire, I have that album! Wow. Obviously time to pull it out again! Funny, it did sound a bit like Jordan to me but the singer threw me off as I didn't remember he had done anything like this. Very cool.

This is getting interesting... I can't wait to find out what some of these others are. Surprised that it actually IS Ron on track #5...am really curious about that one now. And obviously I didn't listen very closely to #4...I think I know who the tenor player and piano player are but I'm not sure if I should give it away yet...? You know what I mean. :)

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I think #5 is from the album The Great Jazz Trio at the Village Vanguard, with Hank Jones, Ron Carter and Tony Williams, the first song on Side 2, "Favors".

6119hrX0dCL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Edited by Hot Ptah

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My initial thought was that it came from the Inward Fire album, which was the first Clifford Jordan I owned.

Correct!

Here goes with the first half...

1. Calypso! For the first solo, another round of the age-old BFT question, is it a bass or a cello? I'll bite -- it's a cello, nice solo too. Nice tenor, somebody with a Paul Gonsalves influence – Ricky Ford, Toby Delius? The straight-four swing part of this tune's bridge is borrowed from the bridge of "Well You Needn't." This is a fun way to start.

Different time period.

2. "Lonely Woman" of course, played with reverence. The violin has me thinking Billy Bang. A Google search leads me to think it's from this album. The timing and instrumentation seem to match. I don't have the record. Wish I did, especially if this cut is on there.

Correct. This one has been ID'd twice, now. THAT is a surprise to me. :blink:

4. A "location" recording, from a seat closer to the drums than to the piano. Nice piano, nice arrangement. I'll cop to not liking the alto solo, which tries too hard to build climaxes and just sounds forced. Is that Gary Bartz? The tenor solo has a much nicer flow. The drum solo, rare at this tempo, really works.

I will share this thought with the tenor player. No doubt he will be pleased.

5. For some reason I can't put my finger on, I'm thinking Larry Willis. And older recording on a piano that's a little creaky. But still worth hearing.

Not Larry. That creaky piano could be a clue, though.

6 Oh, why do they bury singers in instrumental doublings like this? I heard the same thing happen in a live setting not long ago. The singer had taken pains to write words to Joe Henderson's "Inner Urge," but two saxes insisted on playing along, and you can't make out a single word. The tenor here has gotta be Clifford Jordan, absolutely gotta be. I have almost all the Jordan records but can't turn up this tune in my collection. Must be from "Inward Fire," one of the few I'm lacking.

Correct!

DEAR ORGANISSIMO FORUM,

PLEASE STOP COMBINING MY POSTS! I'M A BIG BOY WITH A CERTAIN DEGREE OF TECH SAVVY; IF I WANT THIS TO HAPPEN, I WILL MAKE IT HAPPEN.

THAT IS ALL.

:crazy::crazy::crazy:

I think #5 is from the album The Great Jazz Trio at the Village Vanguard, with Hank Jones, Ron Carter and Tony Williams, the first song on Side 2, "Favors".

Ding! Ding! Correct. Hence the remark about the "creaky piano".

Edited by Thom Keith

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Commence kicking and screaming now as I’m once again dragged into the Wide World of Skronk!

Track 1: “Don’t Stop the Dixieland Carnival.” Clarinet sounds like he wandered into the wrong studio, but hey, when in Rome. A cello solo! Whatta concept! Dig the groove, too!

Track 2: I appreciate it for the concept if not the execution. I like it that there are a lotta stringed instruments, but that didn’t make it any more listenable. I know, big surprise there...

Track 3: Was going to insert the usual snarky comments about squawky sax players when it occurred to me how amazed I was, while listening to the theme, that one of two things had to have happened: either this was written out, which completely blows my mind given how many different notes & the rapidity with which they were played; OR, this was all spontaneous and it just happened to work out! I find that endlessly fascinating even if I can’t usually listen to it.

Track 4: Started out liking this a lot, can’t help but wonder if this was a private recording made by the drummer or someone sitting very close by. Then the saxes came in. You know the rest...

Track 5: Now you’re talking! VERY nice! And yes, I’ll be the first to admit that my tastes are generally staid, boring, and predictable, but the reason I like this is because the theme is just so lovely, and the piano goes back to it frequently which I dig a lot. Wow, that was 9-1/2 minutes? Sure didn’t feel like it!

Track 6: No clue, the vocalese-te takes some getting used to, which I’ll do because the guitar sounds so nice. Josh Redman on tenor?

Track 7: Sounds like Sonny from his RCA days, so that’s what I’ll go with. Or maybe a Joe Henderson trio, maybe something from “State of the Tenor?” Okay, since there’s a trumpet, it can’t be Henderson. So maybe it’s Sonny & Don Cherry. Okay, since there’s an alto, I HAFC™ what I’m talking about. I know, big surprise there... But groovy nonetheless! Nobody’s screaming their brains out, which I dig!

Track 8: I *want* this to be Dudu Phukwana with Hugh Masekela returning the guesting favors that Dudu did on Hugh’s masterpiece “Home Is Where the Music Is.” On second thought, no I don’t. And I REALLY don’t want everyone trying to play louder than everyone else. Loud squawking, goes on forever, blah blah blah... bore bore bore, you sound like a broken record, dude. Put yr teeth back in Grampa and go put on yr Bill Evans records and leave us the hell alone with your ranting and raving about what is and isn’t jazz...

Track 9: Nice! Short! A little dab o’ squawking ain’t too bad when it’s contained like this.

Track 10: That bass is so fat, it’s freakin’ OBESE!!! And I love it!

Track 11: Another nice one. No clue, and I bet the noise-heads among us find this one boring in the context of the rest of this BFT, but I dig it. A lot!

I gotta say, despite my usual visceral reactions to the noisier cuts on this BFT, I’m enjoying this more as it goes along because I’m noticing a recurring theme here: there are squawky tracks on here to annoy us boring old traditionalists, and there are the straight-ahead cuts to irritate the fans of the avant-garde. Even better, they’re programmed in such a way that no one can get comfortable with any one groove for any extended period of time! Mingus would be proud: this BFT was made to irritate the living hell outta people and I LOVE THAT!!!! I wish I had the cajones to pull off a feat like this!!! Or the collection! :)

Track 12: Sounds like it wouldn’t be outta place on the “Silver ‘n’ Voices” album. Dig the tenor sax solo. I hope that whoever did the primal scream at the very end got it all out of his system and is a happier man for it. But it’s all good, cuz that groovy chorus is stuck in my head!

I can’t say this was entirely enjoyable, but I CAN say it was a challenge, and if I can’t enjoy it, I love it when it challenges me! I can’t wait to see what Ptah has to say about this BFT! :lol:

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This is just great music!

I knew it!!! :g

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This is just great music!

I knew it!!! :g

Yes, but this comment was about Track 9, which you said that you liked too!

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Commence kicking and screaming now as I’m once again dragged into the Wide World of Skronk!

Track 1: “Don’t Stop the Dixieland Carnival.” Clarinet sounds like he wandered into the wrong studio, but hey, when in Rome. A cello solo! Whatta concept! Dig the groove, too!

Well played! Except that it's not DSTC! This one is going to give people fits!

Track 4: Started out liking this a lot, can’t help but wonder if this was a private recording made by the drummer or someone sitting very close by. Then the saxes came in. You know the rest...

Made by a sax player sitting, actually, rather close to the sax players (AND the drummer).

Track 6: No clue, the vocalese-te takes some getting used to, which I’ll do because the guitar sounds so nice. Josh Redman on tenor?

No, but there are times where Josh sounds EXACTLY like this guy (ID'd above).

Track 7: Sounds like Sonny from his RCA days, so that’s what I’ll go with. Or maybe a Joe Henderson trio, maybe something from “State of the Tenor?” Okay, since there’s a trumpet, it can’t be Henderson. So maybe it’s Sonny & Don Cherry. Okay, since there’s an alto, I HAFC™ what I’m talking about. I know, big surprise there... But groovy nonetheless! Nobody’s screaming their brains out, which I dig!

True enough, but this guy can squawk with the best of them when he wants to. Also, a clue is that the drummer is more noted for working with squawkers.

Track 8: I *want* this to be Dudu Phukwana with Hugh Masekela returning the guesting favors that Dudu did on Hugh’s masterpiece “Home Is Where the Music Is.” On second thought, no I don’t. And I REALLY don’t want everyone trying to play louder than everyone else. Loud squawking, goes on forever, blah blah blah... bore bore bore, you sound like a broken record, dude. Put yr teeth back in Grampa and go put on yr Bill Evans records and leave us the hell alone with your ranting and raving about what is and isn’t jazz...

I would say Dudu is a contemporary, though obviously in a bit different genre. Hey man, I can't fault you for your tastes. I cringe when something non-Ellington, pre-1940 makes a BFT. ;)

Track 11: Another nice one. No clue, and I bet the noise-heads among us find this one boring in the context of the rest of this BFT, but I dig it. A lot!

Been well received, actually. I will give the hint that this is a guy I ID'd on the first BFT I participated in. A truly unsung warrior of the music.

this BFT was made to irritate the living hell outta people and I LOVE THAT!!!!

Sadly Al, this is just the way my mind/ear works. No intent.

Track 12: Sounds like it wouldn’t be outta place on the “Silver ‘n’ Voices” album. Dig the tenor sax solo. I hope that whoever did the primal scream at the very end got it all out of his system and is a happier man for it. But it’s all good, cuz that groovy chorus is stuck in my head!

Al, that tenor solo IS great. The best part about the primal scream is that it's just that. The singer is a pianist who is singing (rather than the other way around), so it's totally in the moment (which is perhaps what I love most about this cut).

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there are squawky tracks on here to annoy us boring old traditionalists, and there are the straight-ahead cuts to irritate the fans of the avant-garde. Even better, they’re programmed in such a way that no one can get comfortable with any one groove for any extended period of time! Mingus would be proud: this BFT was made to irritate the living hell outta people and I LOVE THAT!!!!

Nope, I love it all! :):party:

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The last half...

7. This is fun. "My Melancholy Baby" by a tenor who's letting the Rollins influence hang out. It's a beautifully constructed solo that sustains its length. It makes me think of Lew Tabackin. Nice trumpet, nice alto. The drumming reminds me of nobody as much as Shelly Manne.

8. Fascinating contrast between the reasonably well rehearsed ensembles and the free blowing. The alto player must be the leader. Is this perhaps an early ECM record, maybe Marion Brown? Otherwise, no guess.

9. Boppin' the blues. For me as well as Bill, the alto stood out. I second his guess. The format where the other horns can join in freely is a kick that some other bands could stand to copy.

10. Nice hot edge to the tenor sound. Oh, dear, here I go guessing Junior Cook again. Maybe a Muse record?

11. Boppin' the blues again. The tenor reminds me of David Newman, a lot.

12. Already weighed in on this one, an old friend.

A perfectly delightful BFT here. Many thanks!

Edited by Spontooneous

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VERY interesting on #5...! Never heard this, may have to pick it up. :)

And I've decided it's not fair for me to reveal #4 since I have "inside information", though that didn't help me when I was first trying to guess it... :unsure:

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The last half...

7. This is fun. "My Melancholy Baby" by a tenor who's letting the Rollins influence hang out. It's a beautifully constructed solo that sustains its length. It makes me think of Lew Tabackin. Nice trumpet, nice alto. The drumming reminds me of nobody as much as Shelly Manne.

This should be a surprise based on the Manne comment.

8. Fascinating contrast between the reasonably well rehearsed ensembles and the free blowing. The alto player must be the leader. Is this perhaps an early ECM record, maybe Marion Brown? Otherwise, no guess.

Brown is not a bad guess; definitely a guy out of that field, but maybe a tad later.

10. Nice hot edge to the tenor sound. Oh, dear, here I go guessing Junior Cook again. Maybe a Muse record?

Right neighborhood, wrong house.

11. Boppin' the blues again. The tenor reminds me of David Newman, a lot.

A bit more of a 'Jazz guy' than The Brain.

12. Already weighed in on this one, an old friend.

A perfectly delightful BFT here. Many thanks!

Thank you, my brother.

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This is just great music!

I knew it!!! :g

Yes, but this comment was about Track 9, which you said that you liked too!

{{{GASP!!!!}}} The delayed response was due to me fainting the first time I read this, coming to, then slipping into a coma upon reading it again, coming to, three days of crying a lot, and now the utter realization that there's no hope left for me.... :wacko::lol::w

Track 8: I *want* this to be Dudu Phukwana with Hugh Masekela returning the guesting favors that Dudu did on Hugh’s masterpiece “Home Is Where the Music Is.” On second thought, no I don’t. And I REALLY don’t want everyone trying to play louder than everyone else. Loud squawking, goes on forever, blah blah blah... bore bore bore, you sound like a broken record, dude. Put yr teeth back in Grampa and go put on yr Bill Evans records and leave us the hell alone with your ranting and raving about what is and isn’t jazz...

I would say Dudu is a contemporary, though obviously in a bit different genre. Hey man, I can't fault you for your tastes. I cringe when something non-Ellington, pre-1940 makes a BFT. ;)

:rofl:

this BFT was made to irritate the living hell outta people and I LOVE THAT!!!!

Sadly Al, this is just the way my mind/ear works. No intent.

I don't believe you. :g:P No seriously, my mind works that way too, which is precisely why I thought it was intentional. It worked, FWIW! :lol:

there are squawky tracks on here to annoy us boring old traditionalists, and there are the straight-ahead cuts to irritate the fans of the avant-garde. Even better, they’re programmed in such a way that no one can get comfortable with any one groove for any extended period of time! Mingus would be proud: this BFT was made to irritate the living hell outta people and I LOVE THAT!!!!

Nope, I love it all! :):party:

Have I mentioned how glad I am that you're participating? I hope you'll stick around for more BFT's! :)

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