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One of the most interesting early Strata-East recordings (that label was a monster when it started, then fell off a cliff).  Two long cuts, provocative front line of Coleman/Jordan/Watkins, the inimitable Harold Mabern on piano.  Larry Ridley and Keno Duke holding down the rhythm duties.  Two very long (20+ minutes each) tracks giving everyone more room to stretch out than they were likely accustomed to.  Not without its flaws, but it has always been a very invigorating listen for me, and I have returned to it often over the 40+ years I've had it, always experiencing substantial pleasure.   Great joy of talented players pushing forward rather than looking back, seeking inspiration here ahead of exhibiting craft, which is the opposite of what the principals seemed to do later in their careers.  As such, it holds a magic for me beyond what maybe its pure musical merits are (though those also are substantial).   Jordan had a great period from the early 60'ss (when he seemed to find his voice with Roach and Mingus) to the late 70's (the great Magic Triangle recordings with Walton/Jones/Higgins), then seemed to start mailing it in to me.  Coleman also at some point seemed to give up the quest in favor of the craft, say, late 80's-early 90's.  I've always thought his work with Miles Davis was underestimated because of him preceding Wayne Shorter.  I'm glad Mabern experienced increased appreciation later in his career, I love his work with Eric Alexander (who is a monster to my ears).  Thoughts?

 

 

Edited by felser

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I hadn't even heard of this album.  Why was it not included in the Clifford Jordan Mosaic?

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Hope this is of help .....

 

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1 hour ago, Guy Berger said:

I hadn't even heard of this album.  Why was it not included in the Clifford Jordan Mosaic?

not produced by Clifford, iirc.

I do enjoy this record, as well as it's follow-up on SE (which has Frank Strozier), and one more Keno Duke record on, what, Trident? They're all of a piece, although this one was recorded live, was it not? The other two weren't.

Keno Duke...one of those guys who never really broke through to "wider public recognition", but also one of those guys who it seemed like if he had a date, he came prepared.

Whatever happened to Keno Duke?

 

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1 hour ago, JSngry said:

not produced by Clifford, iirc.

I do enjoy this record, as well as it's follow-up on SE (which has Frank Strozier), and one more Keno Duke record on, what, Trident? They're all of a piece, although this one was recorded live, was it not? The other two weren't.

Keno Duke...one of those guys who never really broke through to "wider public recognition", but also one of those guys who it seemed like if he had a date, he came prepared.

Whatever happened to Keno Duke?

 

On Trident "Crest Of The Waves" .....

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Really a pity this interesting AOTW is not drawing a lot of feedback .... 

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On 10/1/2016 at 5:37 AM, soulpope said:

Really a pity this interesting AOTW is not drawing a lot of feedback .... 

Perhaps because few of us have ever heard it?

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1 hour ago, danasgoodstuff said:

Perhaps because few of us have ever heard it?

Actually at least one side of this platter was featured here as video one week ago by .... yours truly ....

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2 hours ago, soulpope said:

Actually at least one side of this platter was featured here as video one week ago by .... yours truly ....

Not where I can listen right now, but I'll try to get to it later, Thanks.

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Wow. 1972, baby!

I am listening as I write....

Such an intriguing line up of horns, and as it turns out, a very eager,varied, roiling percussion landscape from Keno Duke. The "Reasons in Tonality" track is fantastic - searching, probing, brimming with ideas. The live setting gives this an off-hand, impromptu sound scape overall.  It all evolves, of course, but the horns push and halt, bubble, stop, and pulse with intensity. Mabern's piano is by turns bluesy and starkly staccato, at points reminding me of McCoy Tyner. Now searching out the second side of the original album, consisting of Keno Duke's composition "3-M.B."

 

Edited by gdogus

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