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Mary6170

BFT # 157 Discussion

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Posted (edited)

I am presenting my first Blindfold Test. I have been listening to Blindfold Tests for some time without commenting very often. I hope that you will like this one.  As soon as Thom Keith is ready to make the link active, we can begin. This is the link which Thom Keith sent to me.  My Blindfold Test will show up as BFT # 157.

http://thomkeith.net/index.php/blindfold-tests/

Edited by Mary6170

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Posted (edited)

   This has taken me to several places I didn't even know existed!
   1. Lush and evocative, with instrumentation associated with George Shearing's quintets, but it sounds more modern.  Eddie Higgins comes to mind.
   2. Blue Note feel.  I'm thinking Lee Morgan, perhaps with Wayne Shorter.
   3. I think I (barely) hear organ in this big band mix.  That makes me lean toward Gerald Wilson.  I definitely hear guitar and am pretty sure it's piano free.
   4. It makes me think Jack Wilson, without being something I remember having heard of his.
   5. Takes that Latin groove and smoothly and gradually elevates it to a whole other level of intensity.  I think I hear both soprano sax and clarinet.  I can't remember anything from Andrew Hill that fits this groove but that's about the right level of inside/out for both the piano playing and the group/composition.
   6. Unusually distorted and processed guitars for a "jazz" date, but not the seventies fusion style.  I haven't heard Bill Frisell record with vibes, but he might be capable of envisioning and carrying out the guitar sounds at the start.
   7. Pretty sure I don't know who this is, bit on those rare occasions where I do, it's probably Herbie Mann.  Nah. Eddie Palmieri is probably a better hail mary.  Sounds authentically Latin and jazz aware at the same time.   Probably newer than either guess.
   8. Very accomplished piano over a very active bass and drums bed of rhythm.  I'm thinking Hilton Ruiz perhaps influenced by the surrounding tracks.
   9. All strings, but with so much drive you don't miss the piano and drums.  I'm thinking this may be viola on top rather than violin.  Mat Maneri?
  10. Cello?, accordion and guitar featured in a tango groove with vocals and percussion.  My chances of knowing this are a lot lower than my chances of loving it.  Richard Galliano?
  11. An electric Miles influenced rhythm bed gives way to a non-Hammond sounding organ and eventually a larger band.  No instrument sounds like the leader.  Maybe Gil Evans?  

  12. This is surf guitar!  More stretched out than the genre usually gets.  I don't really think it's Dick Dale, but I don't have a better guess.
  13. Reminds me of what little I have heard in the exotica genre.  John Zorn has explored that genre some.
  14. I'm guessing we have some kind of guitar synthesizer here.  David Fiuczynski?
 

Edited by randyhersom
added last three tracks

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17 hours ago, randyhersom said:

   This has taken me to several places I didn't even know existed!
   1. Lush and evocative, with instrumentation associated with George Shearing's quintets, but it sounds more modern.  Eddie Higgins comes to mind.
   2. Blue Note feel.  I'm thinking Lee Morgan, perhaps with Wayne Shorter.
   3. I think I (barely) hear organ in this big band mix.  That makes me lean toward Gerald Wilson.  I definitely hear guitar and am pretty sure it's piano free.
   4. It makes me think Jack Wilson, without being something I remember having heard of his.
   5. Takes that Latin groove and smoothly and gradually elevates it to a whole other level of intensity.  I think I hear both soprano sax and clarinet.  I can't remember anything from Andrew Hill that fits this groove but that's about the right level of inside/out for both the piano playing and the group/composition.
   6. Unusually distorted and processed guitars for a "jazz" date, but not the seventies fusion style.  I haven't heard Bill Frisell record with vibes, but he might be capable of envisioning and carrying out the guitar sounds at the start.
   7. Pretty sure I don't know who this is, bit on those rare occasions where I do, it's probably Herbie Mann.  Nah. Eddie Palmieri is probably a better hail mary.  Sounds authentically Latin and jazz aware at the same time.   Probably newer than either guess.
   8. Very accomplished piano over a very active bass and drums bed of rhythm.  I'm thinking Hilton Ruiz perhaps influenced by the surrounding tracks.
   9. All strings, but with so much drive you don't miss the piano and drums.  I'm thinking this may be viola on top rather than violin.  Mat Maneri?
  10. Cello?, accordion and guitar featured in a tango groove with vocals and percussion.  My chances of knowing this are a lot lower than my chances of loving it.  Richard Galliano?
  11. An electric Miles influenced rhythm bed gives way to a non-Hammond sounding organ and eventually a larger band.  No instrument sounds like the leader.  Maybe Gil Evans?  

  12. This is surf guitar!  More stretched out than the genre usually gets.  I don't really think it's Dick Dale, but I don't have a better guess.
  13. Reminds me of what little I have heard in the exotica genre.  John Zorn has explored that genre some.
  14. I'm guessing we have some kind of guitar synthesizer here.  David Fiuczynski?
 

I like your comments.

Track 1. I would not have thought of George Shearing with regard to this track, but it is an interesting comparison. Eddie Higgins is not on this track. It is from a later date than any of George Shearing's recordings.

Track 2. I agree with the Blue Note feel. It is not Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter.

Track 3. It is not Gerald Wilson.

Track 4. It is not Jack Wilson, but I understand why you would say that.

Track 5. Andrew Hill is an interesting comparison, but not correct. I like your comment about whole other level of intensity. I agree with that.

Track 6. Insightful comments about the guitar. It is not a 1970s fusion date. Bill Frisell is a good guess, but it is not him.

Track 7. You are making some excellent points. This is both authentically Latin and jazz aware. It is newer than any Herbie Mann. I think that Eddie Palmieri is still active, but it is not him.

Track 8. I agree that this is very accomplished piano. Not Hilton Ruiz.

Track 9..It is violin on top, not viola. Mat Maneri is a great guess, but it is not him.

Track 10. You do not have the instrumentation quite correct. This is an unusual album though. It is not Richard Galliano.

Track 11. That is an intriguing description of this track. It is not Gil Evans, but I can see why you would say that.

Track 12. Not Dick Dale, no.

Track 13. It is an exotica piece, and you have guessed right. It is a John Zorn project.

Track 14. There is no guitar synthesizer on this album. It is not David Fiuczynski.

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Is there a theme to this presentation?

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I had more than one theme in mind. That is all I want to say about it now.

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I am stumped on every track. I will give it another listen.

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46 minutes ago, Hardbopjazz said:

I am stumped on every track. I will give it another listen.

It would be interesting to get your reactions to the music, even if you do not identify anyone.

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I will give my opinion. I am listening once again to see if I can get anything. So far I have lead ears.

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I am also stumped, but there are a lot of interested sounds to be heard on BFT 157.

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Posted (edited)

My thoughts. I can't identify much (or maybe nothing!)

1.  I have no idea who this is, but I like it. It is a throwback to me of the 1970s, when even well respected mainstream jazz artists would release albums with infectious, catchy songs. Nothing wrong with that. I wish the vibes player had soloed longer.

2. This is odd to me because the musicians sound like they are playing in a 1950s Blue Note style, but the drumming sounds more contemporary. I think that the little I hear of the pianist makes me wonder if he or she is not the best soloist in the group.

3.  Very lively, energetic, roaring big band, with some good soloists. I do not hear a jazz master among the soloists, but several are quite good. No idea who this is, but I am looking forward to finding out.

4.  Beautiful, haunting. It reminds me of Brad Mehldau when I saw him live a few years ago, and I thought his playing had deepened in meaning from ten years earlier. Is it him?

5. That is some intense clarinet playing, and an intense band overall. I have no idea who it is. It sounds like a major player at work, but I can't place him, or them.

6.  Another catchy song, with not quite enough jazz soloing for me, although the players sound skilled. I like the immediacy of the appeal of the track, something that is often lost in jazz after a certain point in its history. The guitarist should be identifiable, because not that many jazz guitarists play like that in recordings, but I can't place him.

7. This is odd to me, because it sounds authentically Latin, but the solos veer into other territory, and there are other elements besides Latin music--unless it is a form of Latin music that I am unaware of. I have learned that there are many different styles of Brazilian music, and of Mexican music, which the American listener may be totally unaware of. The solos are quite good. Another one for which I am looking forward to the Reveal.

8. . A very skilled piano trio. I have to admit that I admire this track more than I actually enjoy it.

9.  Wow, what a wild ride! Who can solo that well on violin, and another string instrument--is that a cello? I am not that familiar with the String Trio of New York. There have not been too many string ensembles in jazz though, so that is my guess.

10. That sounds ethnic to me--African, or Middle Eastern? I wonder if The Magnificent Goldberg would know these musicians. I like it.

11. I really like this. The early elements are simple, but immediately appealing. Nothing wrong with that. We could use more of that in jazz. Then a saxophone player emerges. To me it is as if the saxophone soloist emerges out of the mists. The second saxophone soloist may be a more skilled player, but I enjoy the first saxophone soloist's playing more. I have no idea who this is, but I want to find out!

12. This is really wild stuff. I have no idea who would play like this. This may sound odd, but when the strings suddenly appear, it is as if the clouds open and sunshine pours in. It reminds me of the very end of Jethro Tull's 'Thick As a Brick' when similar strings suddenly appear in the midst of some dense, rather intense playing. I have no idea who this is. I wish that the guitarist had soloed longer.

13. Exotica. I have heard quite a bit of 1950s exotica on a public radio program on the public station in Lawrence, Kansas, hosted by Darrell Brogdon, the Retro Cocktail Hour. Whoever recorded this track knows their 1950s exotica. There are little touches here that are so authentic. But the solos sound more contemporary. Is it a skilled recreation of that era?

14. I love this track. It has a dreamy feeling to it that really appeals to me. It reminds me of something that would have been done in the early, creative days of fusion in the early 1970s. I have no idea who it is. If it was recorded in the early 1970s, I missed it back then.

A really interesting Blindfold Test! It is different from many BFTs which we have had here, and I like this type of variety.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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STONY always has a guitar - James Emery.  The other thoughts I had for 9 were Erik Friedlander, Maxine Roach and Turtle Island, just because these instruments don't often play in this combination and this style.

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Posted (edited)

On 4/2/2017 at 4:28 PM, randyhersom said:

 

5 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

My thoughts. I can't identify much (or maybe nothing!)

1.  I have no idea who this is, but I like it. It is a throwback to me of the 1970s, when even well respected mainstream jazz artists would release albums with infectious, catchy songs. Nothing wrong with that. I wish the vibes player had soloed longer.

2. This is odd to me because the musicians sound like they are playing in a 1950s Blue Note style, but the drumming sounds more contemporary. I think that the little I hear of the pianist makes me wonder if he or she is not the best soloist in the group.

3.  Very lively, energetic, roaring big band, with some good soloists. I do not hear a jazz master among the soloists, but several are quite good. No idea who this is, but I am looking forward to finding out.

4.  Beautiful, haunting. It reminds me of Brad Mehldau when I saw him live a few years ago, and I thought his playing had deepened in meaning from ten years earlier. Is it him?

5. That is some intense clarinet playing, and an intense band overall. I have no idea who it is. It sounds like a major player at work, but I can't place him, or them.

6.  Another catchy song, with not quite enough jazz soloing for me, although the players sound skilled. I like the immediacy of the appeal of the track, something that is often lost in jazz after a certain point in its history. The guitarist should be identifiable, because not that many jazz guitarists play like that in recordings, but I can't place him.

7. This is odd to me, because it sounds authentically Latin, but the solos veer into other territory, and there are other elements besides Latin music--unless it is a form of Latin music that I am unaware of. I have learned that there are many different styles of Brazilian music, and of Mexican music, which the American listener may be totally unaware of. The solos are quite good. Another one for which I am looking forward to the Reveal.

8. . A very skilled piano trio. I have to admit that I admire this track more than I actually enjoy it.

9.  Wow, what a wild ride! Who can solo that well on violin, and another string instrument--is that a cello? I am not that familiar with the String Trio of New York. There have not been too many string ensembles in jazz though, so that is my guess.

10. That sounds ethnic to me--African, or Middle Eastern? I wonder if The Magnificent Goldberg would know these musicians. I like it.

11. I really like this. The early elements are simple, but immediately appealing. Nothing wrong with that. We could use more of that in jazz. Then a saxophone player emerges. To me it is as if the saxophone soloist emerges out of the mists. The second saxophone soloist may be a more skilled player, but I enjoy the first saxophone soloist's playing more. I have no idea who this is, but I want to find out!

12. This is really wild stuff. I have no idea who would play like this. This may sound odd, but when the strings suddenly appear, it is as if the clouds open and sunshine pours in. It reminds me of the very end of Jethro Tull's 'Thick As a Brick' when similar strings suddenly appear in the midst of some dense, rather intense playing. I have no idea who this is. I wish that the guitarist had soloed longer.

13. Exotica. I have heard quite a bit of 1950s exotica on a public radio program on the public station in Lawrence, Kansas, hosted by Darrell Brogdon, the Retro Cocktail Hour. Whoever recorded this track knows their 1950s exotica. There are little touches here that are so authentic. But the solos sound more contemporary. Is it a skilled recreation of that era?

14. I love this track. It has a dreamy feeling to it that really appeals to me. It reminds me of something that would have been done in the early, creative days of fusion in the early 1970s. I have no idea who it is. If it was recorded in the early 1970s, I missed it back then.

A really interesting Blindfold Test! It is different from many BFTs which we have had here, and I like this type of variety.

Very interesting comments. The music moved you at times which is good. Sorry but none of your guesses were right. 

3 hours ago, randyhersom said:

STONY always has a guitar - James Emery.  The other thoughts I had for 9 were Erik Friedlander, Maxine Roach and Turtle Island, just because these instruments don't often play in this combination and this style.

For Track #9, you are right about Erik Friedlander. He is the cellist. You are not right about the other musicians. 

Edited by Mary6170

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Based on the cellist, then it seems likely that #9 is the Masada String Trio.  If so that's two John Zorn projects, perhaps there are more.

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1 hour ago, randyhersom said:

Based on the cellist, then it seems likely that #9 is the Masada String Trio.  If so that's two John Zorn projects, perhaps there are more.

You are correct. It is the Masada String Trio.

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I like the theme to this BFT. I am still trying to figure, but I am still not recognizing anyone.  

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On ‎4‎/‎8‎/‎2017 at 11:17 AM, Mary6170 said:

You are correct. It is the Masada String Trio.

That surprises me, because the Masada String Trio recordings which I have heard feature them in layered, beautiful, textured playing for the most part. I have not heard them in an out and out blowing session like this track.

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1. A very nice piece of music. The pianist and vibe players blend in well. I don't know who this is. The pianist makes those upper notes fell like rain drops.

2. The trumpeter plays very clean, all of his or her notes well executed. The tenor payer doesn't sound like anyone I know. The pianist reminds me of the pianist on the first track.

3. Big band. Nice arrangement. I can't identify any of the soloist.

4. A tango. I really enjoy this piece. Once I find out who it is, I will have to buy a copy. 

5. Is This Anat Cohen on clarinet? Whomever it is on clarinet, he or she is a very fine player.

6. This sounds like something Bill Frisell would play. I doubt it is him on guitar.

7. Nice Latin jazz. Sound contemporary, something recorded not that ling ago. I say this because I don't recognize any of the soloists. I am not to up to date with the newer Latin musicians.

8.  Ant chance this is Mike Rodriguez or Elio Villafranca on piano. I've seen both live and for some reason I hear them in the pianist's playing.

9. Nothing but stings. :) Very skilled musicians. 

10. A Middle Eastern or Turkish flare to this one. I do like it. Another one to put on my list of music to get.

11. Interesting piece of music. 

12. I really like this one too. I haven't a slightest guess who anyone is on this.

13. I like the melody line to this one. It is intoxicating. 

14. Guitar effects are woven well into this piece of music. I like it. I can see myself falling asleep to this. 

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You have provided some interesting comments. Your guesses are not right. 

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Here goes...

1. Too many butterflies on the keyboard for me. The vibes are a nice splash of color, but the player's solo doesn't do much. A re-listen on headphones reveals a weird splash effect on the bass. Is this some new neo-lounge band?

2. Oh, but I like that drumming. The trumpet has a watery tone, but what a great flow of ideas. Dave Douglas? Donny McCaslin? Everything works here.

3. Is that a very distorted Rhodes or Wurlitzer keyboard? And in the left channel, is that an accordion? Rich Perry on tenor? The neo-second-line multi-trombone solo section is a delight. I'm in.

4. This could be any of hundreds of relatively recent trio recordings, and I probably have a weakness for each one. The pianist on this one is never too chops-y.

5. The clarinetist isn't fully engaged with the surroundings. He's listening to the voices in his head instead of the voices around him. But it's interesting enough that I wouldn't mind hearing more.

6. Exotica/private-eye stuff with nice guitar. More style than substance?

7. Paquito on clarinet? I like the violin. And another accordion.

8. Another new trio, newer than the trio on 4. The real story here seems to be in the rhythms, not the pitches, and I'm fine with that. Somebody will probably say that the drummer is too much, but I like the drumming.

9. First thought is Turtle Island String Quartet, but there's only a violin and a cello, and a bass. Quasi-Turkish, I guess. I like the violin solo better than the cello solo; that's a great violin tone.

10. A studio contrivance where one acoustic guitar can be louder than a whole group of percussionists. And a theme for this BFT emerges -- "Where did all these accordions come from?"

11. Very distorted organ? And a choir of four or five horns, on another piece that seems Middle Eastern. It turns into an eventful soundscape. I like that synthesizer doodle at the end.

12. Is that a violin? Marc Ribot on guitar? This is one of my favorite things here.

13. Too self-consciously "exotic" for me. A lot of musicians involved here, and I hope it was a good payday for them.

14. Very "chill," I guess (I'm notoriously un-chill). Rhodes and distorted guitar? Is that perhaps KC's Eddie Moore on Rhodes? A good way to end. 

Thanks, Mary! Can't wait for the reveal.

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2 hours ago, Spontooneous said:

Here goes...

1. Too many butterflies on the keyboard for me. The vibes are a nice splash of color, but the player's solo doesn't do much. A re-listen on headphones reveals a weird splash effect on the bass. Is this some new neo-lounge band?

2. Oh, but I like that drumming. The trumpet has a watery tone, but what a great flow of ideas. Dave Douglas? Donny McCaslin? Everything works here.

3. Is that a very distorted Rhodes or Wurlitzer keyboard? And in the left channel, is that an accordion? Rich Perry on tenor? The neo-second-line multi-trombone solo section is a delight. I'm in.

4. This could be any of hundreds of relatively recent trio recordings, and I probably have a weakness for each one. The pianist on this one is never too chops-y.

5. The clarinetist isn't fully engaged with the surroundings. He's listening to the voices in his head instead of the voices around him. But it's interesting enough that I wouldn't mind hearing more.

6. Exotica/private-eye stuff with nice guitar. More style than substance?

7. Paquito on clarinet? I like the violin. And another accordion.

8. Another new trio, newer than the trio on 4. The real story here seems to be in the rhythms, not the pitches, and I'm fine with that. Somebody will probably say that the drummer is too much, but I like the drumming.

9. First thought is Turtle Island String Quartet, but there's only a violin and a cello, and a bass. Quasi-Turkish, I guess. I like the violin solo better than the cello solo; that's a great violin tone.

10. A studio contrivance where one acoustic guitar can be louder than a whole group of percussionists. And a theme for this BFT emerges -- "Where did all these accordions come from?"

11. Very distorted organ? And a choir of four or five horns, on another piece that seems Middle Eastern. It turns into an eventful soundscape. I like that synthesizer doodle at the end.

12. Is that a violin? Marc Ribot on guitar? This is one of my favorite things here.

13. Too self-consciously "exotic" for me. A lot of musicians involved here, and I hope it was a good payday for them.

14. Very "chill," I guess (I'm notoriously un-chill). Rhodes and distorted guitar? Is that perhaps KC's Eddie Moore on Rhodes? A good way to end. 

Thanks, Mary! Can't wait for the reveal.

You have listened very closely. Your comments show that.

You have guessed Dave Douglas correctly on Track 2.  Donny McCaslin is not on this Track 2.

It is not Rich Perry on Track 3.

It is not Paquito D'Rivera on Track 7.

It is not Turtle Island String Quartet on Track 9.

It is not Marc Ribot on Track 12.

It is not Eddie Moore on Track 14.

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