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CardinalJazzFan

Blindfold Test #163

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On October 1 I will be posting a link which Mr. Thom Keith has prepared for Blindfold Test 163.

This is my first time hosting a Blindfold Test. I have been visiting this board for awhile and have now become a member. 

I hope that you have as much fun listening to this music as I had putting it together. 

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Welcome, we look forward to it!  I remember my first hosted BFT, it was a blast.  And that's a nice 1968 Bob Gibson Topps card as your avatar!

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1 hour ago, felser said:

Welcome, we look forward to it!  I remember my first hosted BFT, it was a blast.  And that's a nice 1968 Bob Gibson Topps card as your avatar!

Thank you. I wondered if anyone would recognize that photo. Bob is one of my favorite all time Cardinals.

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Will their be a selection form Headhunters in tribute to Mr. Gibson? Or a version of Too Close From Comfort?

I jest, no longer a Cardinal fan, but always a Bob Gibson fan.

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3 hours ago, JSngry said:

Will their be a selection form Headhunters in tribute to Mr. Gibson? Or a version of Too Close From Comfort?

I jest, no longer a Cardinal fan, but always a Bob Gibson fan.

That is funny. It was a different era of baseball, and Bob Gibson was one of the masters of the high hard one, inside. I remember how he would throw a fastball close on three straight pitches to someone like Frank Robinson, sending him sprawling into the dirt on each pitch. That would never happen today. The pitcher would be fined and suspended.

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Does Terumasa Hino still pitch?

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On 9/28/2017 at 11:52 AM, JSngry said:

Will their be a selection form Headhunters in tribute to Mr. Gibson? Or a version of Too Close From Comfort?

I jest, no longer a Cardinal fan, but always a Bob Gibson fan.

Or that great standard, "You Go To My Head".

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Track 2

"Avalon" played by a quintet featuring Count Basie and Eddie Lockjaw Davis. Hot mainstream trumpeter reminiscent of Clark Terry and Roy Eldridge, but I don't think it's either of them. Joe Newman, perhaps? Probably recorded under the Norman Granz aegis - Pablo or some such.

Track 3

"Limehouse Blues"

Track 5

This great track is from Duke Ellington's Jazz Party. Jimmy Rushing sings "Hello Little Girl", the Ellington orch roars behind him, Dizzy takes the trumpet solo, Sam Woodyard is much in evidence and it's Jimmy Jones - not Duke - on piano.

Track7

This one's a bit early for me, but - Rex Stewart? - just guessin' :D

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Track 9

Short and sweet. Bill Evans' beautiful "Very Early" done by two guitarists.

 

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9987235843_f94d8a3d5a_b.jpg

TRACK ONE - Either Shank or Pepper on alto? Or both? Activist scoring! More bone than meat, overall. Nut sure which, if any, coast this is from, moments sound George Russelli-sh, actually, but I generally get more meat from Russell than is gotten here, so I'll chalk that up to coincidence.

TRACK TWO - That WILL be Jaws.https://www.discogs.com/Harry-Edison-Edisons-Lights/release/2777312

TRACK THREE - Oh my. I'm sure that felt good at the time, but please, no Bobby Durham references, ever, please! And here's where you'd really want Buddy Rich, actually. This type of Phil gets o my nerves, but Tabackin, it's tenor, so it takes longer. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_Woods/Lew_Tabackin

TRACK FOUR - This came out roughly around the same time as Blue Moses and kind of got lost in the shuffle and ended up in cutout bins too soon, which is a drag because it's a great record, imo. and that WILL be Billy Harper.http://www.allmusic.com/album/tanjah-mw0000178173

TRACK FIVE - ALL cylinders! Jimmys Jones and Rushing, Diddy Galippy, and do you ever NOT want Sam Woodyard? Sounds like a jazz part - IN STEREO! https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Party-Duke-Ellington/dp/B0000026AY

TRACK SIX - I am unequivocal in my love of Betty Carter. https://www.soundstagedirect.com/betty-carter-now-it%27s-my-turn-180-gram-vinyl-lp-import.shtml

TRACK SEVEN - iirc> https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-duke-elington-carnegie-hall-concerts-january-1943-duke-ellington-his-orchestra/165912

TRACK EIGHT - Gabor Szabo? Or not? Phil Woods on cough syrup? Or not? I could like it? Or not? I should recognize the tune? Or not? TPassive-agressive triangle? YES!

TRACK NINE - :Very Early". Not a favorite song, but fullest props to John McLaughlin. http://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/john-mclaughlin/belo-horizonte/

TRACK TEN - Some might call this "dated", and ok, whatever. I like it, it's decisions being made in real time, Don Ellis maybe? Probably. Even if not, I'll usually want to hear a Don Ellis bad decision than most other folk's "correct playing" because by god, Don Ellis was invested in his decisions, all of them. Now is this him? I'm not immediately familiar, but it sounds like him, kind of Kentonish ensemble in some ways, but with real end-to-end ownership, from the pen to the ear. Yeah, that's Don Ellis. and it bugs me that I don't know the exact cut.

TRACK ELEVEN - Don't recognize the record, and do like the music. Very much.

TRACK TWELVE - I'm too old for all that by now. "What will we ever do with you?" is the type of question I no longer ask.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Never too old for Braxton, though!

TRACK FOURTEEN  - Should know this, but don't. Want to, and will. Seems like I've heard it before, but if you can't know for sure, then what difference does it make?

liudMs4.gif

 

 

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21 hours ago, BillF said:

Track 2

"Avalon" played by a quintet featuring Count Basie and Eddie Lockjaw Davis. Hot mainstream trumpeter reminiscent of Clark Terry and Roy Eldridge, but I don't think it's either of them. Joe Newman, perhaps? Probably recorded under the Norman Granz aegis - Pablo or some such.

Track 3

"Limehouse Blues"

Track 5

This great track is from Duke Ellington's Jazz Party. Jimmy Rushing sings "Hello Little Girl", the Ellington orch roars behind him, Dizzy takes the trumpet solo, Sam Woodyard is much in evidence and it's Jimmy Jones - not Duke - on piano.

Track7

This one's a bit early for me, but - Rex Stewart? - just guessin' :D

I am responding to your comments.

2. It is Count Basie and Eddie Lockjaw Davis. I had imagined that maybe listeners would not think that it was Count Basie on piano, because he plays a lot more notes here than he often did in his later career. It is a Norman Granz album. You have not guessed the trumpet player.

3. You have guessed the song title.

5. Everything you have said is correct. I have loved this track for a long time.

7.  The trumpet player is Rex Stewart. When I saw Lester Bowie live I remembered this particular track.

21 hours ago, BillF said:

Track 9

Short and sweet. Bill Evans' beautiful "Very Early" done by two guitarists.

 

It is Bill Evans' "Very Early". According to the album's liner information, there is one guitarist. Maybe overdubbed? I am not sure.

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19 hours ago, JSngry said:

TRACK FOUR - This came out roughly around the same time as Blue Moses and kind of got lost in the shuffle and ended up in cutout bins too soon, which is a drag because it's a great record, imo. and that WILL be Billy Harper.http://www.allmusic.com/album/tanjah-mw0000178173

 

 

 

 

Yeah, I can still see the Record Museum cutout sticker on my copy of it in my mind.  Was my second album by Weston, along with the Montreux set he did with Harper (also a cutout - on my income back then, they were almost always cutouts.  And whatever happened to cutout bins - where do out of print CD's go now?).

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Posted (edited)

19 hours ago, JSngry said:

9987235843_f94d8a3d5a_b.jpg

TRACK ONE - Either Shank or Pepper on alto? Or both? Activist scoring! More bone than meat, overall. Nut sure which, if any, coast this is from, moments sound George Russelli-sh, actually, but I generally get more meat from Russell than is gotten here, so I'll chalk that up to coincidence.

TRACK TWO - That WILL be Jaws.https://www.discogs.com/Harry-Edison-Edisons-Lights/release/2777312

TRACK THREE - Oh my. I'm sure that felt good at the time, but please, no Bobby Durham references, ever, please! And here's where you'd really want Buddy Rich, actually. This type of Phil gets o my nerves, but Tabackin, it's tenor, so it takes longer. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_Woods/Lew_Tabackin

TRACK FOUR - This came out roughly around the same time as Blue Moses and kind of got lost in the shuffle and ended up in cutout bins too soon, which is a drag because it's a great record, imo. and that WILL be Billy Harper.http://www.allmusic.com/album/tanjah-mw0000178173

TRACK FIVE - ALL cylinders! Jimmys Jones and Rushing, Diddy Galippy, and do you ever NOT want Sam Woodyard? Sounds like a jazz part - IN STEREO! https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Party-Duke-Ellington/dp/B0000026AY

TRACK SIX - I am unequivocal in my love of Betty Carter. https://www.soundstagedirect.com/betty-carter-now-it%27s-my-turn-180-gram-vinyl-lp-import.shtml

TRACK SEVEN - iirc> https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-duke-elington-carnegie-hall-concerts-january-1943-duke-ellington-his-orchestra/165912

TRACK EIGHT - Gabor Szabo? Or not? Phil Woods on cough syrup? Or not? I could like it? Or not? I should recognize the tune? Or not? TPassive-agressive triangle? YES!

TRACK NINE - :Very Early". Not a favorite song, but fullest props to John McLaughlin. http://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/john-mclaughlin/belo-horizonte/

TRACK TEN - Some might call this "dated", and ok, whatever. I like it, it's decisions being made in real time, Don Ellis maybe? Probably. Even if not, I'll usually want to hear a Don Ellis bad decision than most other folk's "correct playing" because by god, Don Ellis was invested in his decisions, all of them. Now is this him? I'm not immediately familiar, but it sounds like him, kind of Kentonish ensemble in some ways, but with real end-to-end ownership, from the pen to the ear. Yeah, that's Don Ellis. and it bugs me that I don't know the exact cut.

TRACK ELEVEN - Don't recognize the record, and do like the music. Very much.

TRACK TWELVE - I'm too old for all that by now. "What will we ever do with you?" is the type of question I no longer ask.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Never too old for Braxton, though!

TRACK FOURTEEN  - Should know this, but don't. Want to, and will. Seems like I've heard it before, but if you can't know for sure, then what difference does it make?

liudMs4.gif

 

 

Thank you for the welcoming artwork. It reminds me of how when we want someone to feel at home in St. Louis, we take them to Ted Drewes for a concrete.

1. You have not identified the artist.

2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9.  You have identified everything correctly. Did you get straight A's in school? You are a high achiever.

With that, I am a little bit surprised that you are not immediately familiar with 11 and 12. I thought that 11 and 12 would be the easy ones to guess. Since I just love the music, I included 11 and 12 anyway.

You have the artists correct on 10 and 13. What are the albums?

1 hour ago, felser said:

Yeah, I can still see the Record Museum cutout sticker on my copy of it in my mind.  Was my second album by Weston, along with the Montreux set he did with Harper (also a cutout - on my income back then, they were almost always cutouts.  And whatever happened to cutout bins - where do out of print CD's go now?).

In St. Louis now,  cutouts often go with a saw cut in the plastic case to Half Price Books.  

I love that Randy Weston album. I bought it when it was released.

Edited by CardinalJazzFan

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2 hours ago, CardinalJazzFan said:

Did you get straight A's in school?

Usually, when I wanted to, which wasn't always! :g

2 hours ago, felser said:

 And whatever happened to cutout bins - where do out of print CD's go now?).

Computerized inventory has led to more efficient production/distribution, which means less overstock, which means less cutouts.

One more way in which "efficiency" is both a blessing and a curse.

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On 28/09/2017 at 4:28 PM, CardinalJazzFan said:

On October 1 I will be posting a link which Mr. Thom Keith has prepared for Blindfold Test 163.

This is my first time hosting a Blindfold Test. I have been visiting this board for awhile and have now become a member. 

I hope that you have as much fun listening to this music as I had putting it together. 

Hi CardinalJazzFan

I logged on, expecting to find Jim Sangrey in charge of this one. But I'm downloading yours and looking forward to something I don't know what.

MG

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2 hours ago, The Magnificent Goldberg said:

Hi CardinalJazzFan

I logged on, expecting to find Jim Sangrey in charge of this one. But I'm downloading yours and looking forward to something I don't know what.

MG

I hope that you like it, or at least some of it.

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I certainly did enjoy some of it.

1 Classical-style intro to a polite swing number which I didn’t find too interesting.

2 ‘Avalon’ by a modern large band trying to sound individual but just managing to sound like more than merely adequate session guys. Tenor player sounds a lot like a real person, however. I quite enjoyed him.

3 ‘Chinatown, my Chinatown’ by another modern large band. With another nice tenor player who might well be the same guy. In fact, it might be the same band, as the approach is very similar. Nice chase at the end.

4 Islamic intro. V interesting way to start. Can’t remember the name of the Moroccan stringed instrument that gets the first solo. In comes the tenor player and he’s just playing not quite free enough to turn me off. This definitely ain’t my cup of tea, so I wouldn’t want to hear it a lot, but it’s definitely grabbing me. I really want to know who and what this is. I do wonder, though, why modern musicians are so keen on writing spiky little tunes. Very interesting, thanks.

5 Shit, I should know this singer! Could this be William Basie with James Rushing Esq? Unswinging cymbals behind the trumpet solo say it’s some other band. And the lack of audience says the same. And, returning to the intro, it’s a modern pianist playing like Basie. So what’s true for the pianist is true for the whole band. They’re not doing bad at it, though. A different drummer would help, I reckon.

6 Most gentlemen wouldn’t be as rude about this as I feel like being J Don’t know the song, but it sounds like someone else could make something meaningful of it. We’ve not yet reached the era of ‘everything’s been done so all that’s left is showing off’, as #4 demonstrates.

7 Oh well now, THIS is the way to imitate Basie! I think the trumpet player is trying too hard. It’s not that guy that everyone here hates, whose name I can never remember as I’ve never heard him, is it?

8 Pleasant stuff. Sounds like they resurrected Connie Kay to handle the percussion section.

9 Dunno.

10 Can’t find anything of interest in this. Dozed off towards the end.

11 Oh, ditto, but I haven’t gone to sleep yet. Well, I did, after a couple of minutes. So, onto 12.

12 Oh. Sampled the rest after a few minutes. Hm. Don’t see the point.

13 Another spiky little tune. And spiky soloing, too. Well, I’ve got Chief Commander Ebenezer Obey &his International Brothers to look forward to. On to 14.

14 See? You can even write spiky legato tunes, guys!

But not all of it :g

Now I'll see if I recognise any names.

MG

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Well, covered in shame that I didn't get Jaws.

And this stuff is all a lot older than I imagined.

Oh, it's VERY hard to fool Jim Sangrey!

Thanks very much.

MG

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1. A quirky, mildly ambitious piece. It reminds me at times of early Sun Ra but I am pretty sure it is not him.

2. That is Eddie Lockjaw Davis with an exciting trumpet soloist and a lively pianist who can play stride. No idea what album this is or who they are.

3. That is a ripsnortin' track! I like this s lot. That is some exciting saxophone playing. I don't know who it is.

4. Tanja by Randy Weston, the title track of the album. Billy Harper on tenor sax. That is a great track. I bought this album as a cutout during my first burst of jazz enthusiasm and have always liked it a lot.

5. Hello Little Girl from Duke Ellington's Jazz Party album. Dizzy Gillespie is the trumpet soloist. Jimmy Jones is on piano. Jimmy Rushing on vocals. It is so good to hear this again!

6. I know this one too. Betty Carter from Now It's My Turn, the Cole Porter song Most Gentlemen Don't Like Love. I saw Betty live many times from 1978-82 and she was incredibly good in those years. This recording comes close to what I witnessed.

7. That is Rex Stewart, with Duke Ellington, the song Boy Meets Horn. It is on one of those 2 LP Duke Ellington Carnegie Hall concerts of the 1940s which were released in the mid to late 1970s.

i will discuss the rest of the Blindfold Test later. So far I am really enjoying this one!

 

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8. I find this to be a lovely performance, with a nice feel. I take it that the guitarist is the leader. The saxophone player is also very good.

9. A pleasant little guitar piece. No idea who it is.

10. This has a relaxing feel. It is a unique style and sound. I don't recognize it.

11. This is a favorite of mine. Thanks for including it. I went back and looked and see that no one has identified it yet. This is an album I have played very often. I will wait to see if anyone else identifies it by the later part of the month before I do.

12. This is another selection I know. Again I will wait for someone else to identify it until the later part of the month.

13. I think that this is Anthony Braxton on the 2 LP set I bought and enjoyed in the 1970s, the Montreux/Berlin Concerts. That would mean that Kenny Wheeler is the trumpet soloist. There is another track on that album with this type of tempo and feel, featuring George Lewis on trombone. I like both tracks.

14. Wow, what IS this? WHO is this? A long combination of classical and jazz. I can't wait to find out who this is.

This is quite an enjoyable set of tracks.'Thanks for putting it together.

 

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On ‎10‎/‎7‎/‎2017 at 6:56 AM, The Magnificent Goldberg said:

I certainly did enjoy some of it.

1 Classical-style intro to a polite swing number which I didn’t find too interesting.

 

2 ‘Avalon’ by a modern large band trying to sound individual but just managing to sound like more than merely adequate session guys. Tenor player sounds a lot like a real person, however. I quite enjoyed him.

 

3 ‘Chinatown, my Chinatown’ by another modern large band. With another nice tenor player who might well be the same guy. In fact, it might be the same band, as the approach is very similar. Nice chase at the end.

 

4 Islamic intro. V interesting way to start. Can’t remember the name of the Moroccan stringed instrument that gets the first solo. In comes the tenor player and he’s just playing not quite free enough to turn me off. This definitely ain’t my cup of tea, so I wouldn’t want to hear it a lot, but it’s definitely grabbing me. I really want to know who and what this is. I do wonder, though, why modern musicians are so keen on writing spiky little tunes. Very interesting, thanks.

 

5 Shit, I should know this singer! Could this be William Basie with James Rushing Esq? Unswinging cymbals behind the trumpet solo say it’s some other band. And the lack of audience says the same. And, returning to the intro, it’s a modern pianist playing like Basie. So what’s true for the pianist is true for the whole band. They’re not doing bad at it, though. A different drummer would help, I reckon.

 

6 Most gentlemen wouldn’t be as rude about this as I feel like being J Don’t know the song, but it sounds like someone else could make something meaningful of it. We’ve not yet reached the era of ‘everything’s been done so all that’s left is showing off’, as #4 demonstrates.

 

7 Oh well now, THIS is the way to imitate Basie! I think the trumpet player is trying too hard. It’s not that guy that everyone here hates, whose name I can never remember as I’ve never heard him, is it?

 

8 Pleasant stuff. Sounds like they resurrected Connie Kay to handle the percussion section.

 

9 Dunno.

 

10 Can’t find anything of interest in this. Dozed off towards the end.

 

11 Oh, ditto, but I haven’t gone to sleep yet. Well, I did, after a couple of minutes. So, onto 12.

 

12 Oh. Sampled the rest after a few minutes. Hm. Don’t see the point.

 

13 Another spiky little tune. And spiky soloing, too. Well, I’ve got Chief Commander Ebenezer Obey &his International Brothers to look forward to. On to 14.

 

14 See? You can even write spiky legato tunes, guys!

 

 

But not all of it :g

Now I'll see if I recognise any names.

MG

Thank you for your close attention and listening. I expected that some listeners might not like the avant garde selections, so I put them all together at the end. You can just stop listening when it gets to the part of the Test that you do not like.

It is Sam Woodyard of the Ellington band on Track 5, of the unswinging cymbals as you put it.

I bought the Duke Ellington Jazz Party album as an LP in the late 1970s. The liner notes stated that this Hello Little Girl recording was an unplanned, spontaneous jam session in the studio. Duke is not on piano, but conducted the band as the recording unfolded. Jimmy Jones is on piano. Jimmy Rushing had always wanted to sing with the Ellington band and took this opportunity when it presented itself, according to the liner notes.

I have always wondered how off-the-cuff this recording could be, because the band plays simple riffs but plays them very precisely together. Maybe top musicians can just do that as a group with no rehearsal or planning. I wonder what the musicians on this board would have to say about that.

22 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

1. A quirky, mildly ambitious piece. It reminds me at times of early Sun Ra but I am pretty sure it is not him.

2. That is Eddie Lockjaw Davis with an exciting trumpet soloist and a lively pianist who can play stride. No idea what album this is or who they are.

3. That is a ripsnortin' track! I like this s lot. That is some exciting saxophone playing. I don't know who it is.

4. Tanja by Randy Weston, the title track of the album. Billy Harper on tenor sax. That is a great track. I bought this album as a cutout during my first burst of jazz enthusiasm and have always liked it a lot.

5. Hello Little Girl from Duke Ellington's Jazz Party album. Dizzy Gillespie is the trumpet soloist. Jimmy Jones is on piano. Jimmy Rushing on vocals. It is so good to hear this again!

6. I know this one too. Betty Carter from Now It's My Turn, the Cole Porter song Most Gentlemen Don't Like Love. I saw Betty live many times from 1978-82 and she was incredibly good in those years. This recording comes close to what I witnessed.

7. That is Rex Stewart, with Duke Ellington, the song Boy Meets Horn. It is on one of those 2 LP Duke Ellington Carnegie Hall concerts of the 1940s which were released in the mid to late 1970s.

i will discuss the rest of the Blindfold Test later. So far I am really enjoying this one!

 

Track 1 is not early Sun Ra. I never thought of that.

You are correct on all of the names that you have mentioned.

21 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

8. I find this to be a lovely performance, with a nice feel. I take it that the guitarist is the leader. The saxophone player is also very good.

9. A pleasant little guitar piece. No idea who it is.

10. This has a relaxing feel. It is a unique style and sound. I don't recognize it.

11. This is a favorite of mine. Thanks for including it. I went back and looked and see that no one has identified it yet. This is an album I have played very often. I will wait to see if anyone else identifies it by the later part of the month before I do.

12. This is another selection I know. Again I will wait for someone else to identify it until the later part of the month.

13. I think that this is Anthony Braxton on the 2 LP set I bought and enjoyed in the 1970s, the Montreux/Berlin Concerts. That would mean that Kenny Wheeler is the trumpet soloist. There is another track on that album with this type of tempo and feel, featuring George Lewis on trombone. I like both tracks.

14. Wow, what IS this? WHO is this? A long combination of classical and jazz. I can't wait to find out who this is.

This is quite an enjoyable set of tracks.'Thanks for putting it together.

 

Track 13 is Anthony Braxton with Kenny Wheeler on the album that you mention.

Thank you for your close attention and listening.

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