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BFT 165

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BFT 165 can be found in the link below (thanks as always to Thom Keith for posting).   Music is from a 31-year period, but as usual mostly from my mid-60's to mid-70's sweet spot, with boundaries stretched in some different directions.  Looking forward to sharing this with you, and to your discussion!

 http://thomkeith.net/index.php/blindfold-tests/

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Not falling behind on this one, my friend!  Some morsels in here!

Track 01 - This might be one step beyond what I can really muckle on to.  Usually, anything that conjures visions of a 1973 El Dorado tends to make me pretty happy, but this seems to lean one extra step away from "Jazz" and towards Chicago.  Tenor solo brings it back a bit, but again, just outside my sphere.  This actually reminds me a lot of Bill Cosby's Badfoot Brown and the Bunions Bradford Marching Band.  I'm guessing I don't know the players by name here, but I'll hazard a shot at Rudolph Johnson on tenor.  It cooks, I'll give it that.  Almost feels a little polished for what it's aiming for.  The Dick Griffin, Phil Ranelin stuff of the era had enough slop in it to keep me smiling.  This seems like it might be a bit more towards commercial (thus cleaner) than that stuff.  I'm on the fence about it, probably in part because I can't put a decent guess on what it is.  A little nod to the Beatles in the fade?

Track 02 - Ah... there's a nice bass hook, with some simple backbeat... now we're talking.  Well, not sure what it's being called here, but that's Hugh Lawson's Joobubie (which has had various titles on different records).  Not sure who the tenor is.  Has a touch of George Adams in his cleanness, but it's not Big George.  Just a bitch of a tune.  Very interested to know what this one is.

Track 03 - First thought was a Blakey cut, but that's obviously not the case.  Shades of Kenton, though seems more out of that vein than his own stuff.  Tenor is like Harold Vick and Bill Saxton had a child... and maybe Stubblefield raised it.  In fact, that may well be Stubb.  Seems like a variation on Coltrane changes.  Kind of a busy arrangement, but not overbearing.  If it's not Kenton, it could be Manuel De Sica.  I don't know this, but I think I want to hear some more.

Track 04 - Harold Land, for sure.  What a SOUND!  And there's Bobby.  Off to a stellar start.  Sounds like the progression of Dark Mood.  It's not the version I'm familiar with (definitely not Billy Higgins).  That means it's the version from this.  I have this, but I'm less familiar with it than other stuff from Hutcherson/Land.

Track 05 - "I have no kick against modern jazz, unless they try to play it too darn fast, and change the beauty of the melody, until it sounds just like a symphony..."  Damned tenor.  I know h im.  I mean, I KNOW him.  But... damn it!  He's playing just beyond a tempo he can handle.  He's got that same, almost gasping quality to some of the lower register that Harold Land has.  Almost like Charles Lloyd, but seems too bold.  At the onset, I was leaning Scofield.  Now I'm torn between Sco and Pat Martino.  

Track 06 - Good old Jazz waltz -- nothing quite like it.  I cheated on this one and Googled it.  I thought I heard Junior Mance in there.

Track 07 - Speaking of Ranelin, that sure sounds like him to me.  Perhaps it might be somebody a little more towards "the tradition," but the energy is certainly compatible.  A very Tyner-esque piano, some FIERY drumming which certainly owes at least a nod to Elvin, though it could be the man himself.  This kicks a bit of ass.  No idea who the lunatic on piano is, but I think I love him.  Not Elvin.  Energetic MF, though!  Man, I need this.  This is killin'!

Track 08 - Aw yeah!  Last track on the A-side of this.  Such a bitchin' tune!  Sonny recorded this later with Pharoah and Elvin on Ask The Ages as Many Mansions.  His tune, I guess he can do with it what he wants.  Elvin DESTROYS this and it is EPIC!

Track 09 - I was thinking, this one HAS to be McCoy.  However, that's a Woody Shaw tune.  Damned if I can tell you the name.  Wait!  No!  I'm a huge, fat liar!  That's Hannibal!  No!  Okay, this is funny.  I had to sleuth this out in the collection, knowing full well I had it.  About 2-1/2 minutes in, I made a note to myself (as I do throughout the year for tunes for my next BFT): "Jothan Callins" figuring I'd pick the tune later.  When I found the bass hook, I spent 3 minutes laughing at myself before coming back to the computer to type.  Fair enough.  Tim Webb turned me onto this record.  I know nothing of the artist other than this absolutely bitchin' recording.  It's the title track from this.

Track 10 - Has the feel of a Mingus tune.  No idea who, but I like this.

Track 11 - No clue.  Shades of Cream.  Interesting.  I like it, but not sure if I would go to this well unless in a specific mood.  [Additional listens prompted me to sleuth this, but I'm not going to ID it; very interesting story, and indicative of one of the many gaps in my listening, even after nearly five decades.]

Great stuff, as usual!

 


 

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5 hours ago, tkeith said:

Not falling behind on this one, my friend!  Some morsels in here!

Track 01 - This might be one step beyond what I can really muckle on to.  Usually, anything that conjures visions of a 1973 El Dorado tends to make me pretty happy, but this seems to lean one extra step away from "Jazz" and towards Chicago.  Tenor solo brings it back a bit, but again, just outside my sphere.  This actually reminds me a lot of Bill Cosby's Badfoot Brown and the Bunions Bradford Marching Band.  I'm guessing I don't know the players by name here, but I'll hazard a shot at Rudolph Johnson on tenor.  It cooks, I'll give it that.  Almost feels a little polished for what it's aiming for.  The Dick Griffin, Phil Ranelin stuff of the era had enough slop in it to keep me smiling.  This seems like it might be a bit more towards commercial (thus cleaner) than that stuff.  I'm on the fence about it, probably in part because I can't put a decent guess on what it is.  A little nod to the Beatles in the fade?  Definitely of a time and place which is slightly outside of this board's focus (but one I really like), and I'll guarantee that you Do know many of the players here, including the tenor player!

Track 02 - Ah... there's a nice bass hook, with some simple backbeat... now we're talking.  Well, not sure what it's being called here, but that's Hugh Lawson's Joobubie (which has had various titles on different records).  Not sure who the tenor is.  Has a touch of George Adams in his cleanness, but it's not Big George.  Just a bitch of a tune.  Very interested to know what this one is.  Yes, has a different title here.  I think this is be the first-ever recording of this tune.

Track 03 - First thought was a Blakey cut, but that's obviously not the case.  Shades of Kenton, though seems more out of that vein than his own stuff.  Tenor is like Harold Vick and Bill Saxton had a child... and maybe Stubblefield raised it.  In fact, that may well be Stubb.  Seems like a variation on Coltrane changes.  Kind of a busy arrangement, but not overbearing.  If it's not Kenton, it could be Manuel De Sica.  I don't know this, but I think I want to hear some more.  Not any of the people you named.  Surprised you didn't ID the tune, though the version is not a well-known one.

Track 04 - Harold Land, for sure.  What a SOUND!  And there's Bobby.  Off to a stellar start.  Sounds like the progression of Dark Mood.  It's not the version I'm familiar with (definitely not Billy Higgins).  That means it's the version from this.  I have this, but I'm less familiar with it than other stuff from Hutcherson/Land.  Yes, first released here

Track 05 - "I have no kick against modern jazz, unless they try to play it too darn fast, and change the beauty of the melody, until it sounds just like a symphony..."  Damned tenor.  I know h im.  I mean, I KNOW him.  But... damn it!  He's playing just beyond a tempo he can handle.  He's got that same, almost gasping quality to some of the lower register that Harold Land has.  Almost like Charles Lloyd, but seems too bold.  At the onset, I was leaning Scofield.  Now I'm torn between Sco and Pat Martino.  Thought this one would be fun.  Not Sco or Martino, but a fine, somewhat overlooked guitarist.

Track 06 - Good old Jazz waltz -- nothing quite like it.  I cheated on this one and Googled it.  I thought I heard Junior Mance in there.  Yes you did.  And a very overlooked vocalist.  Good ears to pick up Mance.

Track 07 - Speaking of Ranelin, that sure sounds like him to me.  Perhaps it might be somebody a little more towards "the tradition," but the energy is certainly compatible.  A very Tyner-esque piano, some FIERY drumming which certainly owes at least a nod to Elvin, though it could be the man himself.  This kicks a bit of ass.  No idea who the lunatic on piano is, but I think I love him.  Not Elvin.  Energetic MF, though!  Man, I need this.  This is killin'!  And the whole album is killin'.  Player we know, but an album I just discovered this year.

Track 08 - Aw yeah!  Last track on the A-side of this.  Such a bitchin' tune!  Sonny recorded this later with Pharoah and Elvin on Ask The Ages as Many Mansions.  His tune, I guess he can do with it what he wants.  Elvin DESTROYS this and it is EPIC!  Yep.  Didn't make that connection before, thanks!

Track 09 - I was thinking, this one HAS to be McCoy.  However, that's a Woody Shaw tune.  Damned if I can tell you the name.  Wait!  No!  I'm a huge, fat liar!  That's Hannibal!  No!  Okay, this is funny.  I had to sleuth this out in the collection, knowing full well I had it.  About 2-1/2 minutes in, I made a note to myself (as I do throughout the year for tunes for my next BFT): "Jothan Callins" figuring I'd pick the tune later.  When I found the bass hook, I spent 3 minutes laughing at myself before coming back to the computer to type.  Fair enough.  Tim Webb turned me onto this record.  I know nothing of the artist other than this absolutely bitchin' recording.  It's the title track from thisHe apparently played with Sun Ra later on, and with people as diverse as Lionel Hampton, Chuck Mangione, Stevie Wonder, and B.B. King.  A shame that this is his only album, and that it's never been issued on CD.  Bonus points to any who can name the  rhythm section, who are much better known than Callins.  The is the cut I LEAST expected anyone to ID, but I really wanted people to hear it.  The whole album (in individual cuts) can be found on youtube.

Track 10 - Has the feel of a Mingus tune.  No idea who, but I like this.  Will be interesting ID on this one.

Track 11 - No clue.  Shades of Cream.  Interesting.  I like it, but not sure if I would go to this well unless in a specific mood.  [Additional listens prompted me to sleuth this, but I'm not going to ID it; very interesting story, and indicative of one of the many gaps in my listening, even after nearly five decades.]  This is a guy who helped formulate my musical consciousness, and who did my favorite album of all-time (not the one this cut is from).  Yes, fascinating story across generations.

Great stuff, as usual!  Thanks for your insightful comments and ID's, and for hosting/posting this for me!

 


 

 

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1. This is "New York" from the Dreams album, released in 1970.  The band included Billy Cobham, Randy Brecker, Michael Brecker and John Abercrombie.

3. This is Woody Shaw's composition "The Moontrane." In addition to Woody's recording of it, Dexter Gordon recorded it on his Sophisticated Giant album. I do not know who is performing it here.

11, That is Tim Buckley. I had his Happy Sad album when I was in high school, in the early 1970s. His voice is unmistakable.

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1 hour ago, Hot Ptah said:

1. This is "New York" from the Dreams album, released in 1970.  The band included Billy Cobham, Randy Brecker, Michael Brecker and John Abercrombie.

3. This is Woody Shaw's composition "The Moontrane." In addition to Woody's recording of it, Dexter Gordon recorded it on his Sophisticated Giant album. I do not know who is performing it here.

11, That is Tim Buckley. I had his Happy Sad album when I was in high school, in the early 1970s. His voice is unmistakable.

Correct on all counts!

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So we have full ID's on 1,4,8,9 and partial ID's on 2,3,6,11.  Nothing on 5,7,10.

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track 5: bass player drives me totally nuts. richard davis? jack wilkins on guitar?

Edited by hgweber
typo

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2 hours ago, hgweber said:

track 5: bass players drives me totally nuts. richard davis? jack wilkins on guitar?

Great job,  Davis and Wilkins are both correct!  And drummer is interesting...

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4 hours ago, felser said:

Great job,  Davis and Wilkins are both correct!  And drummer is interesting...

Oh wow. I like to think that I can identify Richard Davis, as I have heard him so often live. But I did not identify him!

Is Track 5 from this album? If so, the drummer is Thelonious Monk, Jr.  If it is that album, I had never heard it before, to my knowledge.

 

281711849690.jpg

Edited by Hot Ptah

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2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

Oh wow. I like to think that I can identify Richard Davis, as I have heard him so often live. But I did not identify him!

Is Track 5 from this album? If so, the drummer is Thelonious Monk, Jr.  If it is that album, I had never heard it before, to my knowledge.

 

281711849690.jpg

Yes, from that album.  I had never heard it before, either, until I picked it up from CDJapan along with some of the other recent Mainstream reissues.  Should now be easy enough to identify which track.

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track 2: the guitar player is fantastic. really channelling early 70s grant green but adds a little something. it's not grant but incredibly close. not benson but again very close. i'd say GG jr. but the recording seems older? i want more.

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8 hours ago, hgweber said:

track 2: the guitar player is fantastic. really channelling early 70s grant green but adds a little something. it's not grant but incredibly close. not benson but again very close. i'd say GG jr. but the recording seems older? i want more.

Older than GG Jr.  Not a big name like Green or Benson!

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4 hours ago, felser said:

Older than GG Jr.  Not a big name like Green or Benson!

wow. looking very much forward to the reveal on that one. i can't come up with a single name. it's not sonny greenwich either.

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3 hours ago, hgweber said:

wow. looking very much forward to the reveal on that one. i can't come up with a single name. it's not sonny greenwich either.

Not Greenwich, who I like a lot.

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First listen as we speak:

TRACK ONE - Dreams. I would have loved to have seen them live. I did see Tower Of Power live in their prime, and that was at least as good as this, but Dreams always had more ways to go. I've never heard any live boots of them, but there's an old Caught In The Act review from DB(ack in the day) that is soooo damn appetizing.

TRACK TWO - Harold Vick? Almost Clifford Jordan, but it's got that Harold Vick "lag" in the time, love it. Is that Ted Dunbar? No matter, I like it, it feels organic, not grafted or otherwise forced, like somebody's playing a "style", they're just playing the tune and this is how the tune goes.

TRACK THREE - "Moontrane", obviously, although by who? Somebody thinks they're Joe Henderson...hey, nothing wrong with thinking. I can like it without loving it, right? I'd like to hear the same people on the same chart at least 10 years earlier if at all possible.

TRACK FOUR - Hutch & Harold. Most of their records sound the same to me, so I have no idea which one this is, and I mean that as compliment, actually. It just means that their music is always "there", that I can ride the vibe (no pun intended) no matter what the record.

TRACK FIVE - Wow, that's fun! I'd like to hear Jaws and Griff get into it on this tune! Seems like the tenor player runs out of ideas pretty early on, or at least has to riff til inspiration returns. That tempo alone sets the bar pretty high, and if they don't exactly fly over it, they don't knock it off either. Again, fun to hear at least once. And I very much like the drummer.

TRACK SIX - Ok, that's what's her name, Irene Krall, with Junior Mance, that's a great fucking record!!!! ALL OF IT!!!! This song was written by somebody from the Kingston Trio, right, or associated with them? It's so dated and faux-hip that it's actually cool, and Irene Krall, hey, helluva singer, and this might be her best record, imo.

TRACK SEVEN - Curtis Fuller? A pumped up Curtis Fuller if so, and all the better for it. Nah, that's not Curtis, but dammit, who is it, Slide Hampton? He's got that Freddie thing going, just on the trombone, and it's really good. Not JJ, becuase when they recorded piano like that. JJ wasn't playing., Who is that pianist? Who are these people? They engage me! Raising the bandstand for sure! Is this an MPS record? Is that Jacki Byard? This a record I could buy.

TRACK EIGHT - Gotta be Elvin, not going to make that same mistake twice! Why did they mix the bass so much higher than the alto, where is the sense in that? I'm in it for Elvin, but the rest could be "anybody", really..oh wait,that's not a bassist, it's a guitar? Or is it two basses...can't really tell. Oh well.

TRACK NINE - I'm really weary of the whole "add a layer" type intro/exposition, but you know...it's what people do. As is riding a vamp half to death because that's all they got and where they go it. Seems to be even longer than it is, and maybe if I had heard it "then", it might have worked. Now, not so much.

TRACK TEN - Sounds like an ok guitarist got a budget to hire some superior players to jamvamp behind him/her while they free-associated some Mingus hooks. I suppose I should recognize at least the bassist, but no luck. Oh, it's live. Well then, could be any damn body. It's probably some all-star feelgood Event Of The Century or some such.

TRACK ELEVEN - Oh, Tim Buckley. I like a motherfucker who's not afraid to push until it hurts and then push some more. That's kind of how babies are often born, and Tim Buckley often felt like he was giving birth. Not sure if it always "worked", but dude, thanks for going there with that. It worked enough to matter.

2 & 7, really looking forward to the reveal. But thanks for it all!

 

 

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18 hours ago, JSngry said:

First listen as we speak:

TRACK ONE - Dreams. I would have loved to have seen them live. I did see Tower Of Power live in their prime, and that was at least as good as this, but Dreams always had more ways to go. I've never heard any live boots of them, but there's an old Caught In The Act review from DB(ack in the day) that is soooo damn appetizing.  I saw Tower of Power do the halftime show at a 49'ers game at Candlestick decades ago, and they could bring it.  But I agree Dreams had more ways to go.  And boy, did they pick the wrong way with that second album they did.  Sure didn't see Muscle Shoals coming from that first album.  The "names" from the first album were gone by then, but it was still a bomb, and there was still considerable talent in the group.

TRACK TWO - Harold Vick? Almost Clifford Jordan, but it's got that Harold Vick "lag" in the time, love it. Is that Ted Dunbar? No matter, I like it, it feels organic, not grafted or otherwise forced, like somebody's playing a "style", they're just playing the tune and this is how the tune goes.  Not Vick or Dunbar.  Actually sort of surprised no one has got this one yet.

TRACK THREE - "Moontrane", obviously, although by who? Somebody thinks they're Joe Henderson...hey, nothing wrong with thinking. I can like it without loving it, right? I'd like to hear the same people on the same chart at least 10 years earlier if at all possible.  This is the latest recording on my BFT by a considerable margin.  I love the arrangement, am OK with the soloing.  And it's the arranger's record.

TRACK FOUR - Hutch & Harold. Most of their records sound the same to me, so I have no idea which one this is, and I mean that as compliment, actually. It just means that their music is always "there", that I can ride the vibe (no pun intended) no matter what the record.  Tom ID'd this one.  I agree tthey were always "on".

TRACK FIVE - Wow, that's fun! I'd like to hear Jaws and Griff get into it on this tune! Seems like the tenor player runs out of ideas pretty early on, or at least has to riff til inspiration returns. That tempo alone sets the bar pretty high, and if they don't exactly fly over it, they don't knock it off either. Again, fun to hear at least once. And I very much like the drummer.  Interesting when you see who the drummer is.  This album has been ID'd already, though the correct tune has not been.

TRACK SIX - Ok, that's what's her name, Irene Krall, with Junior Mance, that's a great fucking record!!!! ALL OF IT!!!! This song was written by somebody from the Kingston Trio, right, or associated with them? It's so dated and faux-hip that it's actually cool, and Irene Krall, hey, helluva singer, and this might be her best record, imo.  I agree with all of your thoughts, wanted people to hear her/it.  Kingston Trio recorded other material by the same songwriters.

TRACK SEVEN - Curtis Fuller? A pumped up Curtis Fuller if so, and all the better for it. Nah, that's not Curtis, but dammit, who is it, Slide Hampton? He's got that Freddie thing going, just on the trombone, and it's really good. Not JJ, becuase when they recorded piano like that. JJ wasn't playing., Who is that pianist? Who are these people? They engage me! Raising the bandstand for sure! Is this an MPS record? Is that Jacki Byard? This a record I could buy.  Yes, Slide Hampton!  Not MPS, but there's good reason your ears thought it might be.  The whole album is great, grab it fast while it's still around.

TRACK EIGHT - Gotta be Elvin, not going to make that same mistake twice! Why did they mix the bass so much higher than the alto, where is the sense in that? I'm in it for Elvin, but the rest could be "anybody", really..oh wait,that's not a bassist, it's a guitar? Or is it two basses...can't really tell. Oh well.  Not Elvin, but one of the most underrated drummers of all-time.  Elvin did play on a later version of this.  Thom ID'd this one.

TRACK NINE - I'm really weary of the whole "add a layer" type intro/exposition, but you know...it's what people do. As is riding a vamp half to death because that's all they got and where they go it. Seems to be even longer than it is, and maybe if I had heard it "then", it might have worked. Now, not so much.  Oh well, it works for me big-time.  Thom ID'd, against all reason.  Can you get the rhythm section?  All well-known,  though the trumpet player is not.

TRACK TEN - Sounds like an ok guitarist got a budget to hire some superior players to jamvamp behind him/her while they free-associated some Mingus hooks. I suppose I should recognize at least the bassist, but no luck. Oh, it's live. Well then, could be any damn body. It's probably some all-star feelgood Event Of The Century or some such.  I thought somebody would get this, but now I'm not so sure.  You're very cold on your guesses,  but so is everyone else.  Second person who mentioned Mingus associations, but there are none.

TRACK ELEVEN - Oh, Tim Buckley. I like a motherfucker who's not afraid to push until it hurts and then push some more. That's kind of how babies are often born, and Tim Buckley often felt like he was giving birth. Not sure if it always "worked", but dude, thanks for going there with that. It worked enough to matter.  Agreed, it worked enough to really matter before it went off a cliff ca. 1970 (though he could still bring it live as late as 1973).  "Goodbye and Hello" is my favorite album ever, but this is not from that.  You can sure hear where Jeff got his voice and inspiration from.

2 & 7, really looking forward to the reveal. But thanks for it all!  Thanks as always for your insightful and entertaining feedback!

 

 

 

Edited by felser

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