felser

BFT 177 link and discussion thread

18 posts in this topic

Having a quick listen, here's what I recognize, or at least recognize as generally familiar,

TRACK ONE - Joe Lee Wilson, although with who, I can't say. No matter, works for me!!

TRACK TWO - Charles Earland w/Hubert Laws and Lee Morgan, doing that Chicago tune. They played the hell outta this on the overnight jazz radio show I listened to as a teen, and it's good to hear it again. How 'bout that Billy Cobham, eh? IN there!

TRACK THREE - oh geez, I know I've heard this one...Harold Vick, maybe? Sounds like the guitarist's date? Eric Gale? I like it when they made records that sounded like this, people today bitch about the direct bass and all that, screw it, that's what it sounded like then, people were playing, and this...oh hell that's Charlie Rouse! Calo Scott & David Lee! Thew Strata-East record. Yeah, okay, yeah I like it when records sounded like that. Go swimming in all that bass, that's what it's there for. SWIM!

TRACK FOUR - Recognizable from literally the first note, Hank's Breakthrough album, not my favorite cut, but nonetheless, listen to Billy Higgins, DAMN! I love this record, it's kinda scary for me at time, I mean Hank is just about as raw nerve, bloody even, as he ever was. There are those who don't "like" this album all that much. I guess I can see that, but hard reality is not always fun. If you want fun, go to Disney. Just sayin'...And Charles Davis is speaking.

TRACK FIVE - Seems like one that might sound more familiar to me than it really is...good energy. Is that Billy Bang?

TRACK SIX - Remember when it was really cool for everything to start with a bass vamp? I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess Chico Freeman? He made a lot of records early on where you could here that he was juuuuuust on the brink of his chops being really there, but not quite. But he played with a strong feeling then, and got over enough to keep him viable until he did. and he did. Now if this isn't Chico Freeman, I don't know. But this is a really good trio, the backing goes ahead and gives it up. Everybody should be able to carpe diem like Chico Freeman, I really admire him for doing that.

TRACK SEVEN - Blakey early 70s Prestige, one of those records..Anthenagin, maybe? Woody Shaw/Carter Jefferson, wait, no, hell no, that's Elvin with Thad and Hank, one of the At6lantic records. Midnight something or other, right? Yeah, that['s didn't sound like Woody, and that couldn't be anybody but Hank. It was the Rhodes and the press role that threw me. Dam, I must be getting old to not get that right off the bat. That Rhodes riff should be unforgettable! I played the hell outta that record when I finally got it. It took a long time, too long, not until somewhere in the early 90s, I think.

TRACK EIGHT - The unmistakable sounds of Count Basie! No, just kidding, Ra, maybe? He made soooo many records, I don't even try to hear them all. Eventually maybe, I mean, I take them as I find them and got the "basics" back in the day. But I don't know if this is Ra or not, to be honest...that's NOT Gilmore on tenor for sure. It reminds me a little bit of Roscoe, but Roscoe is usually more adamantly stubborn about his articulation than this...I give up. I like it well enough, sure. I will say this though - the recording sounds like early digital, and I do not like it when they made records that sound like that. Give me the fuzzy Rhodes and swimming pool bass over the pointy ping, please. Is that Don Pullen? And that sure sounds like Lester Bowie, so it's a keeper, just because. Ok, I was unaware of this one, that would be Jarman, and this is the record: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fundamental_Destiny

TRACK NINE - Haven't really dug too deeply into the South African/Brotherhood Of Breath thing, to be honest, but I have heard some things by them that put me in mind of this. I like it a lot. But then the alto starts sounding like Gary Bartz, so I don't know. Yes I do, that's Woody on trumpet and I hear applause, so that's gotta be Home. STRONG. WheredaCD?

TRACK TEN - This why young people need Kamasi Washington and old people don't. "Everybody" needs "this", it's just a question of who's going to do it in their time. The tune itself reminds me of a Doug Carn tune, "Revelation", but I don't think it is, although the vocal group seems to have Jean Carn in the mix somewhere. I love those Doug/Jean records, this one here, maybe not so much. It's not Carlos Garnett, is it?

TRACK ELEVEN - It's love. It's the Rascals. It's Hubert Laws. Hubert Laws is on a lot more Atlantic records that might be casually assumed.

Hey, haven't had a lot of time to do the BFT thing lately, no going to have much more this month (t'is the season!), but I ahd a window today, so...carpe diem, right? This was enjoyable. This is all, to one degree or another) music that is one type of musical "home cooking" for me. Thanks!

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, JSngry said:

Having a quick listen, here's what I recognize, or at least recognize as generally familiar,

TRACK ONE - Joe Lee Wilson, although with who, I can't say. No matter, works for me!!  Not him!

TRACK TWO - Charles Earland w/Hubert Laws and Lee Morgan, doing that Chicago tune. They played the hell outta this on the overnight jazz radio show I listened to as a teen, and it's good to hear it again. How 'bout that Billy Cobham, eh? IN there!  Yes, I knew this would not be a difficult ID, but it makes me so happy to hear, I wanted to share it, and felt it was a good segue from the first track.  Billy Harper also plays on this album.  "Happy Cause I'm Going Home".

TRACK THREE - oh geez, I know I've heard this one...Harold Vick, maybe? Sounds like the guitarist's date? Eric Gale? I like it when they made records that sounded like this, people today bitch about the direct bass and all that, screw it, that's what it sounded like then, people were playing, and this...oh hell that's Charlie Rouse! Calo Scott & David Lee! Thew Strata-East record. Yeah, okay, yeah I like it when records sounded like that. Go swimming in all that bass, that's what it's there for. SWIM!  Yes, very unusual record for Rouse.

TRACK FOUR - Recognizable from literally the first note, Hank's Breakthrough album, not my favorite cut, but nonetheless, listen to Billy Higgins, ***! I love this record, it's kinda scary for me at time, I mean Hank is just about as raw nerve, bloody even, as he ever was. There are those who don't "like" this album all that much. I guess I can see that, but hard reality is not always fun. If you want fun, go to Disney. Just sayin'...And Charles Davis is speaking.  Yeah, I love Higgins and the rhythm section on this.

TRACK FIVE - Seems like one that might sound more familiar to me than it really is...good energy. Is that Billy Bang? Not Bang.  Interesting group.  

TRACK SIX - Remember when it was really cool for everything to start with a bass vamp? I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess Chico Freeman? He made a lot of records early on where you could here that he was juuuuuust on the brink of his chops being really there, but not quite. But he played with a strong feeling then, and got over enough to keep him viable until he did. and he did. Now if this isn't Chico Freeman, I don't know. But this is a really good trio, the backing goes ahead and gives it up. Everybody should be able to carpe diem like Chico Freeman, I really admire him for doing that.  Not Freeman, but a good group like you say.  I like those early Freeman records best, they have more energy and excitement than his later, more refined work.  And I love those albums he made with Cecil McBee.

TRACK SEVEN - Blakey early 70s Prestige, one of those records..Anthenagin, maybe? Woody Shaw/Carter Jefferson, wait, no, hell no, that's Elvin with Thad and Hank, one of the At6lantic records. Midnight something or other, right? Yeah, that['s didn't sound like Woody, and that couldn't be anybody but Hank. It was the Rhodes and the press role that threw me. Dam, I must be getting old to not get that right off the bat. That Rhodes riff should be unforgettable! I played the hell outta that record when I finally got it. It took a long time, too long, not until somewhere in the early 90s, I think.  Yes. Midnight Walk.. I also got it in the early 90's on a Collectables twofer CD.

TRACK EIGHT - The unmistakable sounds of Count Basie! No, just kidding, Ra, maybe? He made soooo many records, I don't even try to hear them all. Eventually maybe, I mean, I take them as I find them and got the "basics" back in the day. But I don't know if this is Ra or not, to be honest...that's NOT Gilmore on tenor for sure. It reminds me a little bit of Roscoe, but Roscoe is usually more adamantly stubborn about his articulation than this...I give up. I like it well enough, sure. I will say this though - the recording sounds like early digital, and I do not like it when they made records that sound like that. Give me the fuzzy Rhodes and swimming pool bass over the pointy ping, please. Is that Don Pullen? And that sure sounds like Lester Bowie, so it's a keeper, just because. Ok, I was unaware of this one, that would be Jarman, and this is the record: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fundamental_Destiny  Yes, I was unaware of this recording prior to a board member selling it to me.  One of my favorite AEC albums now.

TRACK NINE - Haven't really dug too deeply into the South African/Brotherhood Of Breath thing, to be honest, but I have heard some things by them that put me in mind of this. I like it a lot. But then the alto starts sounding like Gary Bartz, so I don't know. Yes I do, that's Woody on trumpet and I hear applause, so that's gotta be Home. STRONG. WheredaCD?  I've been asking that for years.  How could Fantasy, who put out almost every scrap of the Prestige/Riverside/Milestone catalogs on CD sleep on this great album?

TRACK TEN - This why young people need Kamasi Washington and old people don't. "Everybody" needs "this", it's just a question of who's going to do it in their time. The tune itself reminds me of a Doug Carn tune, "Revelation", but I don't think it is, although the vocal group seems to have Jean Carn in the mix somewhere. I love those Doug/Jean records, this one here, maybe not so much. It's not Carlos Garnett, is it?  Not Carn or Garnett.  I like this record a lot, and the main singing voice will be an interesting surprise.  I agree, we all need this, or at least I do.  This record is from then, not now.  This isn't the equal of the Doug & Jean Carn albums on Black Jazz, but what is?

TRACK ELEVEN - It's love. It's the Rascals. It's Hubert Laws. Hubert Laws is on a lot more Atlantic records that might be casually assumed.  The bass player is also a heavyweight.  And the album with this on went top 5 pop in 1967.  I wanted to draw attention to how adventurous this GREAT group was in their prime.  And this album is their masterpiece.

Hey, haven't had a lot of time to do the BFT thing lately, no going to have much more this month (t'is the season!), but I ahd a window today, so...carpe diem, right? This was enjoyable. This is all, to one degree or another) music that is one type of musical "home cooking" for me. Thanks!  Thank you also!

 

 

 

 

Edited by felser

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Some pretty cool stuff.  I'm more 50's and 60s oriented, though I was quite intrigued (and for that matter enjoyed) early fusion.  You seem to be concentrating  on lesser known stuff--in other words, not Mahavishnu, Return to Forever, Weather Report.

Some stuff here also represents the more accessible side of avant garde.

I don't think I've ever heard Cedar Walton play electric piano!

Could #5 be Leroy Jenkins?  I don't know his music at all, but would like to explore it.

I like #6.  It seems to be in the vein of David Murray, Arthur Blythe, Chico Freeman; but it's none of them. Could it be DeJohnette on drums?

The Rascals....just love that group, and I have a growing awareness of how much they brought in a jazz influence (and jazz musicians).

Well, I'm not able to guess much on what is still unidentified.

 

  

 

 

 

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33 minutes ago, Milestones said:

Some pretty cool stuff.  I'm more 50's and 60s oriented, though I was quite intrigued (and for that matter enjoyed) early fusion.  You seem to be concentrating  on lesser known stuff--in other words, not Mahavishnu, Return to Forever, Weather Report.

Some stuff here also represents the more accessible side of avant garde.

I don't think I've ever heard Cedar Walton play electric piano!  He played it on the early 70's Jazz Messengers albums on Prestige.  He was really good on it.

Could #5 be Leroy Jenkins?  I don't know his music at all, but would like to explore it.  Not Jenkins.

I like #6.  It seems to be in the vein of David Murray, Arthur Blythe, Chico Freeman; but it's none of them. Could it be DeJohnette on drums?  Not any of them.

In some ways, #5 and #6 are the most interesting cuts on this BFT.

The Rascals....just love that group, and I have a growing awareness of how much they brought in a jazz influence (and jazz musicians).  Yes they did.  I could just have easily picked "Nubia" from the "See" album.  And that doesn't even approach the utter jazz moves of 'Peaceful World'. 

Well, I'm not able to guess much on what is still unidentified.

 

  

 

 

 

 

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If not Joe Lee Wilson, Leon Thomas?

Oh my, #5, I just realized what that is. Seems like one that might sound more familiar to me than it really is...good energy.  True on all counts. Pay attention to Burnett Anderson, he's the one really playing.

Edited by JSngry

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4 hours ago, JSngry said:

If not Joe Lee Wilson, Leon Thomas?

Oh my, #5, I just realized what that is. Seems like one that might sound more familiar to me than it really is...good energy.  True on all counts. Pay attention to Burnett Anderson, he's the one really playing.

Not Leon Thomas either.  Yeah, #5 :D:D

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If it ain't Joe Lee and not Leon T...I know it's not Andy Bey, so I'm out of instinctual guesses.

The lyrics are sorta Silveto-era/Horace Silver, but that's not Horace. Their "instructional" nature has me thinking Strata-East maybe? Of some other self-determinational base?

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1 minute ago, JSngry said:

If it ain't Joe Lee and not Leon T...I know it's not Andy Bey, so I'm out of instinctual guesses.

The lyrics are sorta Silveto-era/Horace Silver, but that's not Horace. Their "instructional" nature has me thinking Strata-East maybe? Of some other self-determinational base?

Strata-East is correct.  Always a good guess on my BFT's.

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Oh, that makes it easy for The Google Whisperer: http://neverenoughrhodes.blogspot.com/2008/05/freedom-of-speech-billy-parkers-fourth.html

And even though neither of the front-line has ever been a really compelling soloist for me, it sounds like the other people on the record sure as hell are getting there, so...

I'm happy to say that I've heard most of the Strata-East catalog. Happy, but not proud, because I've never heard this one. About to remedy that...

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2 hours ago, JSngry said:

Oh, that makes it easy for The Google Whisperer: http://neverenoughrhodes.blogspot.com/2008/05/freedom-of-speech-billy-parkers-fourth.html

And even though neither of the front-line has ever been a really compelling soloist for me, it sounds like the other people on the record sure as hell are getting there, so...

I'm happy to say that I've heard most of the Strata-East catalog. Happy, but not proud, because I've never heard this one. About to remedy that...

I've heard almost all of it also, and missed out on buying this CD when it was affordable.  I agree on the front line, have always considered the brothers functional, but not front line.  The singer/pianist got a lot of airplay in his brother's band around that time - "Expansions" was my theme song for one of my college radio shows ("Leaving This Planet" was my theme song for my other one - remember, it was the early 70's).  Of the 56 original Strata-East releases, I've heard 51 in full, owned 46 of them at one time or another (I was able to come by them easily in Philly in the 70's), and currently own 25 of them on CD.  Biggest MIA's for me that are on CD are the Cecil McBee and the Weldon Irvine (neither of which are really great albums, but they're good), and the one we are talking about here.  Biggest MIA's because they've not ever made it to CD are the Mtume (personnel and era/feel make it essential, though it is underrehearsed and sloppy), the Shirley Scott (best album she ever did), the Harold Vick (ditto) and the awesome Jazz Contemporaries "Reasons in Tonality".  Would also be nice to have the Cosmic Twins, the other Jazz Contemporaries, the Charles Davis, and the Brass Company on CD.  The ones I've never heard in full are The Descendants of Mike and Phoebe (one of many Bill Lee projects on the label), the other John Gordon, the Muriel Winston, the Bruce Johnston/Rodney Jones, and the Billy C.  I've heard parts of some of them.  

Edited by felser

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Alrighty!  Here goes.  I got an advanced listen but wanted to wait to post because I knew I did pretty well.  December is a bear with work, so I went ahead and listened when Felser sent the test.

Track 01 -- Discovered this one by accident while searching for music by William Parker.  This features Don Smith's vocals (better known to me from Dick Griffin's Now Is The Time).  Incidentally, he's also Lonnie's brother.  It's the opener from this.

Track 02 -- Huh!  Speaking of Dick Griffin!  Another opener.  Discovered this one looking to round out my collection of another Billy (who appears on one track on the B-side).  It's track 1 from this.  Hubert Laws!  I came to him via his brother Ronnie appearing on Solid Gold when I was just a pup.  MUCH to love on this record (WHAT A TRUMPET SECTION!!!!).  

Track 03 -- I got the tenor as Rouse pretty quickly, but I had to mine the collection to find this one.  WOW!  ANOTHER opener!  This time from this.

Track 04 -- Tasty Rhodes!  The House on Maple Street!  Smilin' Billy, so I'm assuming Walton and Jordan.  No!  Wait!  Duh!  I've got this.  I think it's the last thing I have by Hank Mobley.  Track 3 from this.

Track 05 -- Hmmm.  You have me on this one, brother.  Got that 70s sound so my first thought is Urbaniak.  Maybe with some of the cats from era (Randy Brecker?).  No, seems like these guys are headier than RB.  

Track 06 -- HAHAHA!!!  How dare you, sir!

Track 07 -- Aw yeah!  Track 2 with NASTY Thad from this.  And there's that Henry guy.  Man, discovered this one only a few years back -- what a BITCH of a record.  E is SUCH a bad man!

Track 08 -- No shit, I was just listening to this track (another version) on the drive to work.  This is not a familiar version, but Don Pullen is doing his thing.  And George Adams?  Oh!  No!  AAAAHHH!  It's track 3 from this.  Filthiness!  

Track 09 -- This song... I know this, but again, not this version.  Quite likely, because that sure sounds like Gary Bartz.  Definitely Gary, sounds like Freddie?  No!  That's Woody Shaw.  This has to be from the Blackstone set.  Never going to place the title.

Track 10 -- Checking the mirror on my Mercury Cyclone for the po-lice.  Rhodes, horns, mixing between 70s jazz-funk and swing.  This is what Maynard WANTED his band to sound like in the 70s.  So much to love in this.  The voices work, the shifting feel.  That NASTY, growling bari!  It's like if Children of Forever didn't take itself so severely seriously (but in a good way! -- another album I love, by the way).  I'll be interested in the reveal on this one.  But, I swear, if it's Kamasi, I'm quitting.  On the one hand, I'll be pissed if I have this.  On the other hand, it'll save me money if I do.

Track 11 -- I'm a bad person, but all I can see if Dick Shawn's LSD performing this, and it makes me happy as hell!

Much happiness in this one!

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Track 11 is “It’s Love” by the Rascals from the “Groovin’” album. They were known as the Young Rascals then. With Hubert Laws on flute. Oh now I see that this was identified before.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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1 hour ago, tkeith said:

Alrighty!  Here goes.  I got an advanced listen but wanted to wait to post because I knew I did pretty well.  December is a bear with work, so I went ahead and listened when Felser sent the test.

Track 01 -- Discovered this one by accident while searching for music by William Parker.  This features Don Smith's vocals (better known to me from *** Griffin's Now Is The Time).  Incidentally, he's also Lonnie's brother.  It's the opener from thisStill trying to get this on CD.  I owned the vinyl back in the day.  Nice album.

Track 02 -- Huh!  Speaking of *** Griffin!  Another opener.  Discovered this one looking to round out my collection of another Billy (who appears on one track on the B-side).  It's track 1 from this.  Hubert Laws!  I came to him via his brother Ronnie appearing on Solid Gold when I was just a pup.  MUCH to love on this record (WHAT A TRUMPET SECTION!!!!).  This cut just makes me smile, and it felt like a good segue from cut #1.

Track 03 -- I got the tenor as Rouse pretty quickly, but I had to mine the collection to find this one.  WOW!  ANOTHER opener!  This time from thisVery unusual album for Rouse, and wasn't sure how familiar people would be with it.

Track 04 -- Tasty Rhodes!  The House on Maple Street!  Smilin' Billy, so I'm assuming Walton and Jordan.  No!  Wait!  Duh!  I've got this.  I think it's the last thing I have by Hank Mobley.  Track 3 from thisLove the rhythm section on this cut.  A very early purchase from the $1 cutout store in the early 70's.

Track 05 -- Hmmm.  You have me on this one, brother.  Got that 70s sound so my first thought is Urbaniak.  Maybe with some of the cats from era (Randy Brecker?).  No, seems like these guys are headier than RB.   People will enjoy the reveal on this, especially the tenor player.

Track 06 -- HAHAHA!!!  How dare you, sir!  People will also enjoy the reveal on this, especially the tenor player.

Track 07 -- Aw yeah!  Track 2 with NASTY Thad from this.  And there's that Henry guy.  Man, discovered this one only a few years back -- what a BITCH of a record.  E is SUCH a bad man!  Love the groove on this one.  Early Dollar Brand on this album also.

Track 08 -- No ***, I was just listening to this track (another version) on the drive to work.  This is not a familiar version, but Don Pullen is doing his thing.  And George Adams?  Oh!  No!  AAAAHHH!  It's track 3 from this.  Filthiness!  I never knew this album existed until a couple months ago.  Now maybe my favorite by this group.

Track 09 -- This song... I know this, but again, not this version.  Quite likely, because that sure sounds like Gary Bartz.  Definitely Gary, sounds like Freddie?  No!  That's Woody Shaw.  This has to be from the Blackstone set.  Never going to place the title.  No, not from Blackstone Legacy, not from a Woody album at all.  Sangrey ID'd earlier.

Track 10 -- Checking the mirror on my Mercury Cyclone for the po-lice.  Rhodes, horns, mixing between 70s jazz-funk and swing.  This is what Maynard WANTED his band to sound like in the 70s.  So much to love in this.  The voices work, the shifting feel.  That NASTY, growling bari!  It's like if Children of Forever didn't take itself so severely seriously (but in a good way! -- another album I love, by the way).  I'll be interested in the reveal on this one.  But, I swear, if it's Kamasi, I'm quitting.  On the one hand, I'll be pissed if I have this.  On the other hand, it'll save me money if I do.  Not Kamasi (who I like and appreciate, BTW), it's the genuine original article from 1976.  And so obscure, I'd be shocked if anyone ID'd (except the main singer is sort of fairly well-known in another genre).  But I heard this album on a burn, found it had amazingly been reissued on CD, and sprang for the CD before it disappears forever.

Track 11 -- I'm a bad person, but all I can see if *** Shawn's LSD performing this, and it makes me happy as hell!  ID'd twice in this thread.  This album went top 5 pop (in the same year as Shawn's LSD takes place, I think), contained three top-10 classic singles, including a beloved #1, and is very strong musically.  Pretty incredible group.

Much happiness in this one!  Thanks for hosting/posting, and for the enjoyable interaction on the reveals!

 

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Wow... just noticed it bleeped comedian Richard Shawn's name.  Really, guys?  Really?

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1 hour ago, tkeith said:

Wow... just noticed it bleeped comedian Richard Shawn's name.  Really, guys?  Really?

Only in the quote. But still....

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Thats our family internet filter.

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Reading the other comments here I see that Track 8 is from an Art Ensemble of Chicago with Don Pullen album which I own and have not played in a long time.

This sounds SO good!

I havs often thought about how the early 1990s loss of Sun Ra, Miles Davis and Frank Zappa robbed the world of so much creativity and good music. But the end of the Art Ensemble of Chicago’s Bowie/Jarman/Mitchell/Favors/Moye lineup is an equally huge loss to me. 

Edited by Hot Ptah

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