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jeffcrom

BFT 181 link and discussion

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Track 2. I have this album. It is from the "Indian Summer" album by Dave Brubeck. It is the opening track on the album, "You'll Never Know."

I saw Dave Brubeck live four times in the last decade of his life. I was struck by how good he was, and how evocative his playing was. The cliches about him pounding clumsily on the piano did not fit. So I bought several of his later albums, including this one.

Track 6.  I heard Anthony Braxton play two different solo alto saxophone concerts very much in the style of this recording.

One was at Milwaukee's Jazz Gallery in the summer of 1980. At times during that concert, he sounded more like Johnny Hodges than anyone else I have heard.

In September, 1980, I heard him again, in a solo alto saxophone performance much like this track. It was a Saturday afternoon set at the 1980 Ann Arbor Jazz Festival. (The rest of the 1980 Ann Arbor Jazz Festival: Stephane Grappelli and Oregon on Friday night, Chico Freeman and Stanley Turrentine on Saturday night, Arthur Blythe (with John Hicks, Fred Hopkins and Steve McCall) and Sarah Vaughan on Sunday night.
 

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Brubeck, that makes sense. Whatever else he was or wasn't, he was never clumsy. That's something he had in common with Monk. His time was always rock-solid. Even when he "pounded", it was rock-solid. And when he did his polyrhythms, it was especially rock-solid, it had to be.

That album, is it all solo?

 

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I'm learning some things here.  I don't know anything about Eddie Costa.  I have heard the name, but that's about it.  

I had not known that Elvin recorded with Yusef Lateef.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

Track 2. I have this album. It is from the "Indian Summer" album by Dave Brubeck. It is the opening track on the album, "You'll Never Know."

I saw Dave Brubeck live four times in the last decade of his life. I was struck by how good he was, and how evocative his playing was. The cliches about him pounding clumsily on the piano did not fit. So I bought several of his later albums, including this one.

Track 6.  I heard Anthony Braxton play two different solo alto saxophone concerts very much in the style of this recording.

One was at Milwaukee's Jazz Gallery in the summer of 1980. At times during that concert, he sounded more like Johnny Hodges than anyone else I have heard.

In September, 1980, I heard him again, in a solo alto saxophone performance much like this track. It was a Saturday afternoon set at the 1980 Ann Arbor Jazz Festival. (The rest of the 1980 Ann Arbor Jazz Festival: Stephane Grappelli and Oregon on Friday night, Chico Freeman and Stanley Turrentine on Saturday night, Arthur Blythe (with John Hicks, Fred Hopkins and Steve McCall) and Sarah Vaughan on Sunday night.
 

Correct on track 2. I don't think the Indian Summer album is a masterpiece or anything like that, but it's one I always enjoy when I play it. The slightly melancholy, bittersweet flavor is consistent through the album, which was his final studio recording, I believe. It feels like a valedictory look back on his life.

The last time I saw Braxton play solo was a couple of years ago, when he was artist-in-residence for a couple of weeks at the University of Alabama. I judged the audience at his opening solo concert to be 1/3 excited Braxton fans, 1/3 curious music lovers, and 1/3 music students trying to fulfill their concert attendance requirements. I wondered how the last two groups would respond to the concert, but Braxton's programming was masterful. He started with a lyrical ballad like this, then moved on to a fast, technically impressive virtuoso piece. After those two selections, the audience was with him, and stayed with him when he started playing abrasive multiphonics and such.

2 hours ago, JSngry said:

Brubeck, that makes sense. Whatever else he was or wasn't, he was never clumsy. That's something he had in common with Monk. His time was always rock-solid. Even when he "pounded", it was rock-solid. And when he did his polyrhythms, it was especially rock-solid, it had to be.

That album, is it all solo?

 

Yes - all solo readings of standards.

Edited by jeffcrom

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Posted (edited)

On 4/1/2019 at 11:27 AM, medjuck said:

Haven't listened to all of it yet but really like what I have heard.  (I was listening while working out at the Y this morning.  Great exercise music.)    Only one I've id'd is number 7 (which was pretty easy). Metronome al stars and they really were all stars-- Basie, Bean, Christian, Carter, Goodman etc.  I think Bean's solo was one he later turned into a song.  One Step Down maybe?  

Actually it became Feed'n the Bean which Hawkins recorded with the Basie band later that year. Then even later it became The Bean Stalks Again in The Hawk in HiFi.  (Where Bean and the Boys became 39"-25"-39"

7 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

Track 2. I have this album. It is from the "Indian Summer" album by Dave Brubeck. It is the opening track on the album, "You'll Never Know."

I saw Dave Brubeck live four times in the last decade of his life. I was struck by how good he was, and how evocative his playing was. The cliches about him pounding clumsily on the piano did not fit. So I bought several of his later albums, including this one.


 

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I had much the same experience seeing him shortly before he died.  I wouldn't have recognized him by his playing. (Though he did of course play Take Five.)

Edited by medjuck
research

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