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Hot Ptah

BFT 192 Link and Discussion

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Buchanan did do some singing on some of his Polydor albums, but had absolutely no knack for it.   Very very talented player.  Very troubled human being with a huge drinking problem.  He died in a jail cell in 1988, either by suicide or not, depending which story you choose to believe.  I saw him in concert ca. 1986 at the Mann Music Center.  He was third billed to Stevie Ray Vaughan and the Fabulous Thunderbirds (SRV older brother Jimmy Vaughan's group).  Buchanan was impressive, much more so than the Thunderbirds, but Stevie Ray was amazing that night.  Buchanan was one of those guys (Gary Moore was another), who had incredible guitar chops,and seemingly never quite knew what to do with them.  You can get 150 minutes of prime 70's Buchanan playing for under $10 on this, and it's all you'll ever need by him.

Sweet-Dreams-The-Anthology-Roy-Buchanan-Used-Good-CD

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20 minutes ago, felser said:

Buchanan was impressive, much more so than the Thunderbirds...

See, I always dug the Thunderbirds (aka the Fabulous Thunderbirds) more than Stevie Ray, more than most any of those acts of that ilk. Those guys played as a band, and they always had a good, danceable pocket. No flash, no splash, just the good basic goods.

If you got a good connection to the source, playing that stuff - good, danceable blues-based club music -  is not particularly "hard". It's the people who gotta work too hard at it - and let it show -  that I usually try to keep a distance from.

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4 hours ago, JSngry said:

Roy Buchannan was semi-hot for a quick minute in the early-ish 70s. Had a downbeat article and a few albums on Polydor, as well as an appearance on Don Kirshner's Rock Concert (the one on ABC). I always felt that his playing reflected him not really being a singer (if he did sing to any note, I never heard it). Great player, obviously, just not something I could ever relate to. For me, the further any music gets from having a vocal (not lyrical, mind you, vocal) foundation, the dicier it gets. Especially a vernacular music like "blues".

And yeah, he died pretty early. I guess substance abuse followed him most of his adult life. I played with an old guy in the early 2000s who had known him in DC and that was the story I got. Just a ginormous monkey on his back, one of those cases that seems like a person is just doomed no matter what. Very sad.

If you like blues-rock with guitar solos, Roy recorded some high quality material. Some people don't like that style, which is fine with me!

Roy went on and recorded some excellent albums through 1987. His later albums were on the blues label Alligator Records. He had some good vocalists with him on some of his later material. I have explored a lot of his recordings and they are consistently good to excellent from the early 1970s to 1987.

Reportedly he had gained control of his drinking and was doing well, when he relapsed and was arrested for public intoxication after a domestic dispute. He hung himself in his cell in the Fairfax County, Virginia jail in August, 1988, He was 48 years old. 

Years later i drove past the Fairfax County, Virginia jail. It is in a beautiful high income looking area. The entire situation is very sad. 

3 hours ago, felser said:

Buchanan did do some singing on some of his Polydor albums, but had absolutely no knack for it.   Very very talented player.  Very troubled human being with a huge drinking problem.  He died in a jail cell in 1988, either by suicide or not, depending which story you choose to believe.  I saw him in concert ca. 1986 at the Mann Music Center.  He was third billed to Stevie Ray Vaughan and the Fabulous Thunderbirds (SRV older brother Jimmy Vaughan's group).  Buchanan was impressive, much more so than the Thunderbirds, but Stevie Ray was amazing that night.  Buchanan was one of those guys (Gary Moore was another), who had incredible guitar chops,and seemingly never quite knew what to do with them.  You can get 150 minutes of prime 70's Buchanan playing for under $10 on this, and it's all you'll ever need by him.

Sweet-Dreams-The-Anthology-Roy-Buchanan-Used-Good-CD

That is a fine anthology of his work, but I need more by him. I have heard a lot more of his albums, and they left some great stuff out. 

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#4...the tenor player's tone really sounds like George Adams, but the rest of it maybe not so much. Is it an ECM record somehow? Trying to think of somebody who would have that sound and that phrasing....whoever it is, I really like it.

Also, is #7 Marshall Allen? Not too many altoists play with that range in that range with such total command of the partials.

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4 hours ago, JSngry said:

#4...the tenor player's tone really sounds like George Adams, but the rest of it maybe not so much. Is it an ECM record somehow? Trying to think of somebody who would have that sound and that phrasing....whoever it is, I really like it.

Also, is #7 Marshall Allen? Not too many altoists play with that range in that range with such total command of the partials.

You are not close on #4. The entire album is at this level of artistry and quality. I really like it and it is gratifying to see that you do too when you don’t know who it is, Jim.

#7 is Marshall Allen. Great ears!

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Finally got around to this.  Life was already sucking up too much free time, but now I have to do my thing online, which is MUCH more preparation.  Gah!  We all have problems, I'll quit my bitchin'.  I think I enjoyed most of this more than my comments (upon re-reading) would lead you to believe.  Excepting Track 7, that is.

 

Track 01 — Man, feeling generous love for this off the bat.  Contemplation, maybe?  Digging the absolutely hell out of that bass.  Reminds me of that Tim Webb guy.  Nice!  Contemplation it is.  Wait, I know that tenor.  Yeah, I’m definitely going to play this after I finish this BFT.  Tenor is a touch of modern with a strong nod behind.  Lovano, maybe?  Has a bit of that Mobley thing that Joe has going on.  Just prior to the Invitation quote, feels like it loses steam a bit.  There we go — bebop lick gets it back on track.  I’ll guess it is Joe, because it desperately wants to stay “inside” (not a bad thing, but do that if that’s the case).  Pianist calms down nicely to start the solo.  I’ll give them this, they’re not doing McCoy.  Maybe Joe Caldorazzo?  Drums feel a bit flabby to me… kind of that Schmitty Smith feel, but seems to constrained to be Marvin.  Tain?  No idea who the bass is, but I think I’m in love.

Track 02 — Don’t like that electric bass, but like the Bitches Brew feel in the drums.  Got a remixed Lennie White feel.  I’m not in love with the tenor sound, but at least the spread quality is unique.  Reminds me a bit of Radio Citizen, but is more alive (i.e. real).  Just raw enough to win me over, I think.  Almost like Ricky Ford with more time in the rudimentary shed.  Does feel like this is multitracked (drummers don’t seem to be tuned into the soloist at all — just doing their thing).  

Track 03 — Sax player is stumbling over his toungue like Dudu tended to.  As usual, I know the damned tune, but can’t come up with the name.  I appreciate the bass, but that sloppy articulation has me cringing.  And that’s speaking as the king of slop.  Yes on the bass, all the way through.  But overall, didn’t hold my attention.

Track 04 — I’m a sucker for 12/8.  Also for vibes.  I want to like this, but wish I could hear the lyrics better.  I mean, I do like it, but want for cleaner sound.  It gets dirty, but has an undercurrent of politeness.  Wouldn’t be my top choice of approach, but I like that it’s unique in that way.  I think this would be really fun to see live, because there are times where the seem to be backing off a bit because of the studio (to my ear).  I like it, though.  I like that while it has numerous influences, it’s not beholden to any of them.  Gets gratuitous after 11 minutes, but not enough to ruin for me.  

Track 05 — No fair.  I’m a sucker for Afro-Cuban anything.  I can’t say anything worthwhile, but if something like this comes on, I’m stopping on that channel.  Wife and I used to go out on Saturday’s once or twice a month and becoming home very late, right when WBUR in Boston would have their Latin show on.  It was usually the best part of those nights (hell, I had to drive!).  

Track 06 — Sounds soundtrackie.  I struggle to get my ears around this stuff (but keep trying — my inner Bourdain dictates that I do so).  If this is pop music of the region, I love it.  But wouldn’t choose it over actual Jazz.  I’ve been too restricted by the western scale to fully appreciate this stuff, but recognize it as MY issue, not the music’s.

Track 07 — I like a blowout as much as the next guy, but I”m not hearing interaction here.  Saxophonist is just over-wailing and not listening to what the others are doing around him.  Very close to swiping left on this one.  Yeah, buh-bye.  Like Yoko playing saxophone.

Track 08 — I like the guitar, but really wish the band were more supportive.  Reminds me of that Albert Collins record with Cray and Johnny Copeland — the band just has that 80s compressed honky-tonk sound.  Throw the nice fat bass from track one behind this, maybe a nice Michael Carvin backbeat, and this would KILL.  Is that two or three guitarists?

Track 09 — Believe that would be Sonny Blount.  Damned if I can name the track.  Supersonic Jazz the album?  Swings like hell, as does nearly all Sun Ra of the period.  Appropriate nod to Ellington’s voicings, as always.  If I’m right on the album, that’d be James Scales on alto.  That bari sounds more like Davis than Patrick to me in the first part of the tune.

Track 10 — I dig it once the band comes in, but didn’t like that electronic keyboard in the entrance.  Still can’t give you the name.  This isn’t the Arkestra itself, I don’t think.  That brass in the beginning reminds me of one of the guys in the Murray Octet.  Not Gilmore, but someone who has certainly given their ears to his work (as all should).  I’ll honor this as a solid cover.  

Track 11 — Ginger Spice!!!!  Not the version I’m familiar with, but still a great tune!  Man, that James Carter solo on the Coward Of The County version.  WOW!  This doesn’t feel like Ginger on drums.  Not feeling this gel between the instruments.  Seems almost like a “play-along”.  And there’s that damned electric bass.  I know what it is — sounds like the drummers are listening to a click track.  There is almost no way for this rhythm to NOT change tempo over this course of time.  

Track 12 — This a little Fela tribute?  Maybe Ibrahim Electric?  Always wanted to put together a band focused on music from this area/genre.  About 8 years ago, a local musican did exactly that, and I knew nothing about it until I saw them (with another bari player!).  Well, damn, that certainly has Fela’s feel on the tenor, but the sound of the recording seems too modern.  Seems a bit to constrained to be Fela’s actual band.  Bitch of a cover, though.  Digging the hell out of that trumpet.  Sounds like Bowie at times.  Wait a minute, that’s GOT to be Fela.  Okay, vocals… yes.  Good Christ… I need fresh air.  Had to go look it up.  No Agreement from this.

Track 13 — Has that ABB feel.  I’m going to guess Government Mule in the first 30 seconds.  Unless it’’s one of those late 70s ABB recordings, I’m going to stick with that guess.  

Track 14 — Oh look at you sneaking in there.

Track 15 — That guitar sure sounds like Duane Allman.  I love this kind of stuff (in the right mood) but never delved into learning about it like I did the Jazz stuff.  This feel is one of the things I most enjoyed about seeing The Blue Man Group.  It was all this acid rock instrumental stuff underneath the humor and PVC percussion.  

Seems like you moved a bit outside of your typical BFT boundaries for this one.  I'm kind of glad you did.  Feels like I'll be going back to this one, again, when time allows.

 

After scanning comments, I see I botched my Sun Ra albums, once again, got Bowie without realizing it (not hard to do), and am consistent -- I just neither like nor get Braxton.

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Posted (edited)

3 hours ago, tkeith said:

Finally got around to this.  Life was already sucking up too much free time, but now I have to do my thing online, which is MUCH more preparation.  Gah!  We all have problems, I'll quit my bitchin'.  I think I enjoyed most of this more than my comments (upon re-reading) would lead you to believe.  Excepting Track 7, that is.

 

Track 01 — Man, feeling generous love for this off the bat.  Contemplation, maybe?  Digging the absolutely hell out of that bass.  Reminds me of that Tim Webb guy.  Nice!  Contemplation it is.  Wait, I know that tenor.  Yeah, I’m definitely going to play this after I finish this BFT.  Tenor is a touch of modern with a strong nod behind.  Lovano, maybe?  Has a bit of that Mobley thing that Joe has going on.  Just prior to the Invitation quote, feels like it loses steam a bit.  There we go — bebop lick gets it back on track.  I’ll guess it is Joe, because it desperately wants to stay “inside” (not a bad thing, but do that if that’s the case).  Pianist calms down nicely to start the solo.  I’ll give them this, they’re not doing McCoy.  Maybe Joe Caldorazzo?  Drums feel a bit flabby to me… kind of that Schmitty Smith feel, but seems to constrained to be Marvin.  Tain?  No idea who the bass is, but I think I’m in love.

Reply: wait until you see who this is on the Reveal!

Track 02 — Don’t like that electric bass, but like the Bitches Brew feel in the drums.  Got a remixed Lennie White feel.  I’m not in love with the tenor sound, but at least the spread quality is unique.  Reminds me a bit of Radio Citizen, but is more alive (i.e. real).  Just raw enough to win me over, I think.  Almost like Ricky Ford with more time in the rudimentary shed.  Does feel like this is multitracked (drummers don’t seem to be tuned into the soloist at all — just doing their thing).  

Reply: very interesting comments. I doubt that anyone has actually heard this group before and I wanted to see how it would be received. 

Track 03 — Sax player is stumbling over his toungue like Dudu tended to.  As usual, I know the damned tune, but can’t come up with the name.  I appreciate the bass, but that sloppy articulation has me cringing.  And that’s speaking as the king of slop.  Yes on the bass, all the way through.  But overall, didn’t hold my attention.

Reply: I am glad you said yes on Dave Holland. As you point out, Braxton does nothing for you. 

Quote

Track 04 — I’m a sucker for 12/8.  Also for vibes.  I want to like this, but wish I could hear the lyrics better.  I mean, I do like it, but want for cleaner sound.  It gets dirty, but has an undercurrent of politeness.  Wouldn’t be my top choice of approach, but I like that it’s unique in that way.  I think this would be really fun to see live, because there are times where the seem to be backing off a bit because of the studio (to my ear).  I like it, though.  I like that while it has numerous influences, it’s not beholden to any of them.  Gets gratuitous after 11 minutes, but not enough to ruin for me.  
 

Reply: wait until the Reveal! This is one track from a consistently strong album. 

Track 05 — No fair.  I’m a sucker for Afro-Cuban anything.  I can’t say anything worthwhile, but if something like this comes on, I’m stopping on that channel.  Wife and I used to go out on Saturday’s once or twice a month and becoming home very late, right when WBUR in Boston would have their Latin show on.  It was usually the best part of those nights (hell, I had to drive!).  
 

Reply: I love this one too’

Track 06 — Sounds soundtrackie.  I struggle to get my ears around this stuff (but keep trying — my inner Bourdain dictates that I do so).  If this is pop music of the region, I love it.  But wouldn’t choose it over actual Jazz.  I’ve been too restricted by the western scale to fully appreciate this stuff, but recognize it as MY issue, not the music’s.

Reply: I think everyone will be surprised at who this is. 

Track 07 — I like a blowout as much as the next guy, but I”m not hearing interaction here.  Saxophonist is just over-wailing and not listening to what the others are doing around him.  Very close to swiping left on this one.  Yeah, buh-bye.  Like Yoko playing saxophone.

Reply: an honest reaction! The value of the Blindfold Test process. 

Track 08 — I like the guitar, but really wish the band were more supportive.  Reminds me of that Albert Collins record with Cray and Johnny Copeland — the band just has that 80s compressed honky-tonk sound.  Throw the nice fat bass from track one behind this, maybe a nice Michael Carvin backbeat, and this would KILL.  Is that two or three guitarists?

Reply: just one guitarist, early 1970s recording. This has been identified. 

Track 09 — Believe that would be Sonny Blount.  Damned if I can name the track.  Supersonic Jazz the album?  Swings like hell, as does nearly all Sun Ra of the period.  Appropriate nod to Ellington’s voicings, as always.  If I’m right on the album, that’d be James Scales on alto.  That bari sounds more like Davis than Patrick to me in the first part of the tune.

Reply: this is one of the many early Sun Ra tracks which I love. 

Track 10 — I dig it once the band comes in, but didn’t like that electronic keyboard in the entrance.  Still can’t give you the name.  This isn’t the Arkestra itself, I don’t think.  That brass in the beginning reminds me of one of the guys in the Murray Octet.  Not Gilmore, but someone who has certainly given their ears to his work (as all should).  I’ll honor this as a solid cover.  
 

Reply: Sun Ra recording the same tune again about thirty years later. Interesting that you heard it as a cover band. 

Quote

Track 11 — Ginger Spice!!!!  Not the version I’m familiar with, but still a great tune!  Man, that James Carter solo on the Coward Of The County version.  WOW!  This doesn’t feel like Ginger on drums.  Not feeling this gel between the instruments.  Seems almost like a “play-along”.  And there’s that damned electric bass.  I know what it is — sounds like the drummers are listening to a click track.  There is almost no way for this rhythm to NOT change tempo over this course of time.  

  Reply- The song is Ginger Spice. For the rest, I will wait for the Reveal to tell you. I have never heard the Coward of the Country version with James Carter but soon I will!!!

Track 12 — This a little Fela tribute?  Maybe Ibrahim Electric?  Always wanted to put together a band focused on music from this area/genre.  About 8 years ago, a local musican did exactly that, and I knew nothing about it until I saw them (with another bari player!).  Well, damn, that certainly has Fela’s feel on the tenor, but the sound of the recording seems too modern.  Seems a bit to constrained to be Fela’s actual band.  Bitch of a cover, though.  Digging the hell out of that trumpet.  Sounds like Bowie at times.  Wait a minute, that’s GOT to be Fela.  Okay, vocals… yes.  Good Christ… I need fresh air.  Had to go look it up.  No Agreement from this.

Reply- yes! Fela with Lester Bowie. 

Track 13 — Has that ABB feel.  I’m going to guess Government Mule in the first 30 seconds.  Unless it’’s one of those late 70s ABB recordings, I’m going to stick with that guess.  

Track 14 — Oh look at you sneaking in there.

Track 15 — That guitar sure sounds like Duane Allman.  I love this kind of stuff (in the right mood) but never delved into learning about it like I did the Jazz stuff.  This feel is one of the things I most enjoyed about seeing The Blue Man Group.  It was all this acid rock instrumental stuff underneath the humor and PVC percussion.  
 

Reply: this has been identified. It was recorded before the Allman Brothers recorded their first album. 

Seems like you moved a bit outside of your typical BFT boundaries for this one.  I'm kind of glad you did.  Feels like I'll be going back to this one, again, when time allows.

 

After scanning comments, I see I botched my Sun Ra albums, once again, got Bowie without realizing it (not hard to do), and am consistent -- I just neither like nor get Braxton.


Thanks for your comments, most interesting reactions!

Edited by Hot Ptah

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IIRC (and I often don't). I saw Roy Buchannan at The Horseshoe Tavern in Toronto.  It was a usually a Country and Western bar but I also saw Sun Ra there. 

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Posted (edited)

11 hours ago, medjuck said:

IIRC (and I often don't). I saw Roy Buchannan at The Horseshoe Tavern in Toronto.  It was a usually a Country and Western bar but I also saw Sun Ra there. 

Did you see Sun Ra there in 1978? There is a ten CD set of recordings from that venue.

https://www.discogs.com/Sun-Ra-Live-At-The-Horseshoe-Tavern-Toronto-1978/release/2479620

Edited by Hot Ptah

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2 hours ago, medjuck said:

Yes and I have the set.  At one point you can hear someone sitting near the recording equipment saying something stupid and I think it's me. 

That is great! I saw Sun Ra within a few days of the September, 1978, recordings on this Horseshoe Tavern box. I saw Sun Ra at the 1978 Ann Arbor Jazz Festival, which was a great performance. Sun Ra was the closing act on Saturday night, after Kenny Burrell and Stanley Turrentine each played full sets. 

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1 hour ago, Hot Ptah said:

That is great! I saw Sun Ra within a few days of the September, 1978, recordings on this Horseshoe Tavern box. I saw Sun Ra at the 1978 Ann Arbor Jazz Festival, which was a great performance. Sun Ra was the closing act on Saturday night, after Kenny Burrell and Stanley Turrentine each played full sets. 

I saw Sun Ra at the Empty Foxhole on Penn's campus, probably a year or two earlier.   Quite a spectacle.  Small venue, and they came marching in down the aisles, in full regalia, playing their instruments.  I'm thinking it was Halloween, but I could be wrong.

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I  also saw him in 1961 with a quintet including John Gilmore at a small club in Montreal .  I was just getting into jazz at the time and nothing about it seemed peculiar except that it was August and they played The Christmas Song.   

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If you know Hot Ptah's love for the new London jazz scene and his little crush on the saxophone player, it's not hard to identify track one.

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, corto maltese said:

If you know Hot Ptah's love for the new London jazz scene and his little crush on the saxophone player, it's not hard to identify track one.

That is correct. I have no crush though. I just think she is a promising player. 
 

You remembered that my Blindfold Test from last year had several selections from musicians in the current London jazz scene. 

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Listening right now (finally!) and hope to upload comments later today. Have not read anything in this thread yet. I'm about halfway through the tunes, and so far some killer stuff here! 

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10 minutes ago, Hot Ptah said:

I just think she is a promising player. 

I've heard that about so many players of the last 40 or so years, that they're "promising"...in light of the ongoing results, I have to wonder what the hell it is that they're being perceived as promising to us.

Not to be proddy or anything, genuinely curious, what does that phrase mean to you, "promising player"? And what will it look like if/when that promise is delivered?

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27 minutes ago, JSngry said:

I've heard that about so many players of the last 40 or so years, that they're "promising"...in light of the ongoing results, I have to wonder what the hell it is that they're being perceived as promising to us.

Not to be proddy or anything, genuinely curious, what does that phrase mean to you, "promising player"? And what will it look like if/when that promise is delivered?

Promising = competent and young?   That didn't work out so well 30-40 years ago with the Marsalis "young guys in nice suits and hats" generation, even though they were all "promising and young".  None moreso than Wynton and Branford themselves, and, say someone like Joshua Redman or Courtney Pine.  They're all still competent plus, but I can't think of many that really have made a meaningful lasting (positive) mark.  She did a nice version of the Tyner song, and I really like the bass player.  But to me, the drummer doesn't cut it.   But is it gonna ever hit my speakers in place of Tyner/Henderson more than once.  Nope.   But I wouldn't mind giving the album a listen.      

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Here are my notes as I listened...

Track 1 - I dig this bass player. Nice tone, and a deep feeling to this intro. Oh man, it's a McCoy Tyner tune. Contemplation? I get the names mixed up but I think that's the one. What an incredible legacy Tyner has left behind. As for this performance, I really like this tenor player... the "search" is there. The group is cohesive and play off each other really well. The pianist is technically great but doesn't reach me emotionally as much as the tenor player does.

Track 2 - Another bass intro, hurray! Again, what a great bass sound. Electric bass, yes? Ooooh... I REALLY like the feel on this, especially once the drums kick into that double time kinda thing. This is very cool. Love the extra percussion too. Damn. This feels crazy good. And I love how the tenor player is just cascading notes over the top of this. Killer solo. I like this a whole lot. Couldn't begin to guess who it is but I'm anxious to find out.

Track 3 - Ah yes! I can name that tune in three notes! You Stepped Out of a Dream, Anthony Braxton and my man Dave Holland. This is from one of the Arista albums, but I forget which one. I love Braxton but on this particular track I feel like it takes him a little bit to get warmed up. Still I would give this 5 stars. DH is outstanding as always. 

Track 4 - So, you are batting 1000 on bass players so far! I love this from the get-go. Oh wow... the vocal and tenor blend really nicely on this. And that percolating 12/8 thing underneath... this is beautiful. There's something very familiar about this tenor player. Great sound! Very magical vibe to this tune that I love...this has transported me to another place. And a bit less than halfway through, I see we're just getting started. [6 or 7 mins later]...Wow. I need more of this please! 

Track 5 - Groovy! Funky mallets. The first person who comes to mind is Cal Tjader, just because of his reputation, not because I'm personally very knowledgeable about what he does. Fun tune.

Track 6 - Hmmmm. Not really sure what to make of this. I like that it has a middle eastern flavor to it, but other than that it doesn't do a lot for me unfortunately.

Track 7 - This is more my thing. :) The recording quality places this in the 60s or 70s. The drummer is off the charts! OK...that horn player. This has gotta be Brotzmann or someone like that. And Han Bennink? I listen to a fair amount of outside stuff, but this is more outside than my usual listening. I like it though. It's got to be European.

Track 8 - Nice. I do love me some blues. Right out of the gate, some seriously rock-solid rhythm section playing. And that guitar player--damn! This is killer. Couldn't begin to guess but I hear a whole lotta Chicago in there. Love this.

Track 9 - Oh! I know this! Sun Ra!! DAAAAAMNN I love this. I'm annoyed at myself for not remembering which tune it is, even though I can sing along with it. This is from one of those Delmark records, either Sun Song or Sound of Joy. Love it!

Track 10 - More Sun Ra? Oh wow... it's the same tune as above. Holy smokes. This is fantastic. I don't know this recording. I assume this is also the Arkestra, that definitely sounds like Ra on keys & piano. Definitely excited to find out what record this from. The original is so perfect in its own way but this is one hell of an update, I love where they take this.

Track 11 - GREAT groove opening this one up. Tenor / electric bass / drums sounds like a perfect combo to me. Reminds me a bit of the Odean Pope Trio, but that ain't Gerald Veasley on bass. However, I do love the bass player, nice solo and sound. And that's not Pope either. No idea who this is, but I like it!

Track 12 - A giant nod to Fela here. Deep groove. This is a blast! Wait this IS Fela! Wasn't expecting it to drop down to nothing in the middle there, that was a nice touch as sometimes we need a break from the groove, as great as it is. And then it's cool to hear the different layered parts come back in as the tenor solo builds. Very cool.

Track 13/14/15 - Took me a little while, but I think this is the Allman Brothers? I run hot and cold on them, and I'm no expert, but have definitely heard things I really dug and others not so much. This particular sequence doesn't do a ton for me, unfortunately...there's some good jamming but to me it feels a little bit aimless. Still, cool way to end a REALLY great BFT.

Really looking forward to the reveal on many of these. This was a super fun listen. Thanks so much for your time & effort in putting this together!

Now to go back and see what others had to say...

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Posted (edited)

**** 10 mins later...

Wow, #7 is Marshall Allen? Amazing. And I've been meaning to check out Nubya Garcia, this has sealed the deal. Still several tracks here I'm dying to know.

Thom, apparently you and I both think Quicksilver Messenger Service sounds like the Allman Brothers. :lol: 

Oh and I DEFINITELY need Mayan Temples!

Edited by webbcity

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Is number 2 The Sons of Kemet?  (Though I only hear one bass.) 

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5 hours ago, medjuck said:

Is number 2 The Sons of Kemet?  (Though I only hear one bass.) 

No, it is not.

7 hours ago, webbcity said:

Here are my notes as I listened...

Track 1 - I dig this bass player. Nice tone, and a deep feeling to this intro. Oh man, it's a McCoy Tyner tune. Contemplation? I get the names mixed up but I think that's the one. What an incredible legacy Tyner has left behind. As for this performance, I really like this tenor player... the "search" is there. The group is cohesive and play off each other really well. The pianist is technically great but doesn't reach me emotionally as much as the tenor player does.

Reply--interesting reaction and more positive than some of the other members here. I like the differing reactions.

Track 2 - Another bass intro, hurray! Again, what a great bass sound. Electric bass, yes? Ooooh... I REALLY like the feel on this, especially once the drums kick into that double time kinda thing. This is very cool. Love the extra percussion too. Damn. This feels crazy good. And I love how the tenor player is just cascading notes over the top of this. Killer solo. I like this a whole lot. Couldn't begin to guess who it is but I'm anxious to find out.

Reply--I like it a whole lot too. Compare this bass intro with the bass intro on "Long Long Long" on the Beatles' White Album.

Track 3 - Ah yes! I can name that tune in three notes! You Stepped Out of a Dream, Anthony Braxton and my man Dave Holland. This is from one of the Arista albums, but I forget which one. I love Braxton but on this particular track I feel like it takes him a little bit to get warmed up. Still I would give this 5 stars. DH is outstanding as always. 

Reply--you got it!

Track 4 - So, you are batting 1000 on bass players so far! I love this from the get-go. Oh wow... the vocal and tenor blend really nicely on this. And that percolating 12/8 thing underneath... this is beautiful. There's something very familiar about this tenor player. Great sound! Very magical vibe to this tune that I love...this has transported me to another place. And a bit less than halfway through, I see we're just getting started. [6 or 7 mins later]...Wow. I need more of this please! 

Reply--i like this a lot too. The entire album is this strong. It is one of my favorite albums of its era.

Track 5 - Groovy! Funky mallets. The first person who comes to mind is Cal Tjader, just because of his reputation, not because I'm personally very knowledgeable about what he does. Fun tune.

Reply--This is a Tito Puente early classic which inspired Cal Tjader.

Track 6 - Hmmmm. Not really sure what to make of this. I like that it has a middle eastern flavor to it, but other than that it doesn't do a lot for me unfortunately.

Reply--Wait until everyone learns who this is.

Track 7 - This is more my thing. :) The recording quality places this in the 60s or 70s. The drummer is off the charts! OK...that horn player. This has gotta be Brotzmann or someone like that. And Han Bennink? I listen to a fair amount of outside stuff, but this is more outside than my usual listening. I like it though. It's got to be European.

Reply--As you note later on, this is Marshall Allen with Sun Ra.

7 hours ago, webbcity said:

Track 8 - Nice. I do love me some blues. Right out of the gate, some seriously rock-solid rhythm section playing. And that guitar player--damn! This is killer. Couldn't begin to guess but I hear a whole lotta Chicago in there. Love this.

Reply--I have the same reaction to it.

Track 9 - Oh! I know this! Sun Ra!! DAAAAAMNN I love this. I'm annoyed at myself for not remembering which tune it is, even though I can sing along with it. This is from one of those Delmark records, either Sun Song or Sound of Joy. Love it!

Reply--It is from Sound of Joy.

Track 10 - More Sun Ra? Oh wow... it's the same tune as above. Holy smokes. This is fantastic. I don't know this recording. I assume this is also the Arkestra, that definitely sounds like Ra on keys & piano. Definitely excited to find out what record this from. The original is so perfect in its own way but this is one hell of an update, I love where they take this.

Reply--This is from one of Sun Ra's better late era albums, perhaps his best late era album.

Track 11 - GREAT groove opening this one up. Tenor / electric bass / drums sounds like a perfect combo to me. Reminds me a bit of the Odean Pope Trio, but that ain't Gerald Veasley on bass. However, I do love the bass player, nice solo and sound. And that's not Pope either. No idea who this is, but I like it!

Reply--that is not who it is, but I like your enthusiasm for it.

Track 12 - A giant nod to Fela here. Deep groove. This is a blast! Wait this IS Fela! Wasn't expecting it to drop down to nothing in the middle there, that was a nice touch as sometimes we need a break from the groove, as great as it is. And then it's cool to hear the different layered parts come back in as the tenor solo builds. Very cool.

Reply--It is Fela, and Lester Bowie where it drops down to nothing.

Track 13/14/15 - Took me a little while, but I think this is the Allman Brothers? I run hot and cold on them, and I'm no expert, but have definitely heard things I really dug and others not so much. This particular sequence doesn't do a ton for me, unfortunately...there's some good jamming but to me it feels a little bit aimless. Still, cool way to end a REALLY great BFT.

Reply--this is from before the Allman Brothers started.

Really looking forward to the reveal on many of these. This was a super fun listen. Thanks so much for your time & effort in putting this together!

Thank you! I am glad that you enjoyed it!

Now to go back and see what others had to say...

 

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